CHLH 274 H1N1 group1

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By: zhealth (112 month(s) ago)

I want to download the presentation for teaching purpose and please allow me to do. This presentation may help a lot to control H1N1 spread among the public in my country. Please help me in downloading the same.

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H1N1 influenza was first detected in the US in April 2009 and has spread worldwide.

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H1N1 spreads similarly to the seasonal flu through person to person contact and is very contagious.

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The 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic is a new strain of the H1N1 virus that is often referred to as “swine flu”

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The 2009 H1N1 resulted from a triple re-assortment of bird, pig, and human flu, then combined with a Eurasian pig flu virus

Prevalence : 

Prevalence

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CDC estimates that between 43 million and 88 million cases of 2009 H1N1 occurred between April 2009 and March 13, 2010

Incidence : 

Incidence

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According to the World Health Organization, from March 28-April 3, 2010 (week 13), 2,871 specimens were tested and 105 of those specimens tested positive. The incidence rate of week 13 was 3.7%

Symptoms : 

Symptoms

Fever : 

Fever

Cough : 

Cough

Sore Throat : 

Sore Throat

Runny Nose : 

Runny Nose

Body Aches : 

Body Aches

Headache : 

Headache

Fatigue : 

Fatigue

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Trends Over Time

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The CDC asked states to report cases based on ICD-9 code weekly through a web-based data application.

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Data from each state is due by midnight each Tuesday and then compiled & analyzed by the CDC by Friday. This is known as the FluView report and is consistent with Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Reporting the 2009/2010 Influenza and H1N1 Season : 

Reporting the 2009/2010 Influenza and H1N1 Season Regular seasonal flu co-circulate with H1N1 Lab Data is therefore a great underestimate of true number of cases Bias continued to grow as more people became ill

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Risk Factors

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The main risk factor for contracting the H1N1 Flu is contact with an infected person.

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However, everyone is not at equal risk for a more severe form of the infection.

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Children under the age of 2, Adults over the age of 65, & Pregnant women are all at a greater risk for complications from H1N1.

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Many chronic diseases may also increase the risk of severe complications from the H1N1 virus such as:

Asthma : 

Asthma

Chronic Lung Disease& Heart Disease : 

Chronic Lung Disease& Heart Disease

Neurological Conditions : 

Neurological Conditions

Disorders of the Blood, Endocrine, Kidney, Liver, or Metabolism : 

Disorders of the Blood, Endocrine, Kidney, Liver, or Metabolism

& those with a weakened Immune System : 

& those with a weakened Immune System

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H1N1 Mortality

From August 30, 2009 to April 3, 2010 there have been 41,821 hospitalizations and 2,117 deaths in the U.S. : 

From August 30, 2009 to April 3, 2010 there have been 41,821 hospitalizations and 2,117 deaths in the U.S.

H1N1 has disproportionately affected many… : 

H1N1 has disproportionately affected many… Minority populations The poor The uninsured & Underserved populations

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Burden to the Health Care System

The primary care system serves as a “safety net” for these vulnerable populations. Components of the primary safety net include: : 

The primary care system serves as a “safety net” for these vulnerable populations. Components of the primary safety net include:

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Federally qualified health centers Public hospital clinics Volunteer or free clinics Local public health units

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If the safety net becomes overwhelmed the overflow is likely to fall on emergency departments.

Challenges for these health centers include: : 

Challenges for these health centers include: Lack of financial reserves Lack of clinical capacity

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Low literacy Mistrust of the healthcare system Limited English proficiency

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Control Strategies

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Some control strategies include: Implementation and facilitation of IC (infection control) precautions Patient triage for early detection & patient placement and reporting Organization of services Policies on rational use of available supplies & on patient procedures Strengthening of IC infrastructure

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Environmental/engineering controls, such as basic HCF infrastructure Adequate environmental ventilation Proper patient placement and adequate environmental cleaning can help reduce the spread of some pathogens during health care Rational use of available personal protective equipment (PPE) and appropriate hand hygiene also help reduce spread of infection

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Prevention

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The best way to avoid H1N1 is to wash your hands thoroughly and often

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You should also avoid being in contact with someone who may have the flu or has been exposed to the flu and avoid large crowds if there is a breakout in your city (maintain a minimum distance of >1 meter between patients) You can Shop on days and times when there will be less people out and avoid touching your eyes, nose & mouth

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Other preventative measures include: Getting plenty of rest Try to avoid stress which can lower your immune system Eat as healthy as possible Drink plenty of water

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Take immune boosting supplements & vitamins Before traveling check the health map to see if there is a current outbreak so you can take precautions Listen to the news, CDC, WHO, and other resources

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For more Information visit: www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu www.who.int/cst/resources/publications

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Group 1: Brooke Seesengood Gabby Aguilar Iman Perkins Jordan Everett Valerie Paulo

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