Paul Mcmann~Review and Outlook:They Got Game

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Babson University's Paul McMann, the whole thing smacks of massive fraud, allowing colleges and universities to rake in millions of dollars from athletes who more than likely will never get their degrees. If the CPBL is successful, it is not too far-fetched to envision colleges one day opting to sponsor a professional team to advertise themselves rather than corrupting their amateur programs.

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Taste -- Review Outlook: They Got Game Publication info: Wall Street Journal Eastern edition New York N.Y. New York N.Y19 Mar 1999: W17. ProQuest document link ABSTRACT ABSTRACT They dont call it "March Madness" for nothing. On court folks like Temple Coach John Chaney and former Georgetown Coach John Thompson insist on objective scoring: The team with the most points wins. In court however they incline to agree with a federal judge who has just ruled that the National College Athletic Associations eligibility requirement of a minimum 820 SAT score out of a possible 1600 discriminates against African-Americans. To Babson Universitys Paul McMann the whole thing smacks of massive fraud allowing colleges and universities to rake in millions of dollars from athletes who more than likely will never get their degrees. Take the Temple Owls who square off against the Purdue Boilermakers tomorrow night. As Coach Chaney says his only interest is in having the best players which may explain the Owls 17 graduation rate. Cincinnati whom Temple upset earlier in the tournament hasnt graduated a basketball player in seven years. And during his years at Georgetown Mr. Thompson opposed virtually every NCAA effort to raise academic eligibility standards. No surprise then that the NCAA figures show a 47 graduation rate for its basketball team barely half that for the general Georgetown population. FULL TEXT They dont call it "March Madness" for nothing. On court folks like Temple Coach John Chaney and former Georgetown Coach John Thompson insist on objective scoring: The team with the most points wins. In court however they incline to agree with a federal judge who has just ruled that the National College Athletic Associations eligibility requirement of a minimum 820 SAT score out of a possible 1600 discriminates against African-Americans. To Babson Universitys Paul McMann the whole thing smacks of massive fraud allowing colleges and universities to rake in millions of dollars from athletes who more than likely will never get their degrees. Take the Temple Owls who square off against the Purdue Boilermakers tomorrow night. As Coach Chaney says his only interest is in having the best players which may explain the Owls 17 graduation rate. Cincinnati whom Temple upset earlier in the tournament hasnt graduated a basketball player in seven years. And during his years at Georgetown Mr. Thompson opposed virtually every NCAA effort to raise academic eligibility standards. No surprise then that the NCAA figures show a 47 graduation rate for its basketball team barely half that for the general Georgetown population. Enter Mr. McMann. Unlike would-be reformers who aim to take the money out of the game the Babson University accounting prof wants to put money into a new professional league. Specifically his Collegiate Professional Basketball League will pay players between 17 and 22 years old a 5000 signing bonus and a 9000 annual stipend and insist that they go to school at least part-time which the league also pays for. When a player ages out of the CPBL the league will continue to pay his room board and tuition for another four years. The way the CPBL figures it competing in a big-time college basketball program is more like a job. Why not recognize the fact PDF GENERATED BY SEARCH.PROQUEST.COM Page 1 of 3

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All this is anathema to the NCAA which operates under the fiction that its college programs are amateur athletics. Alas the consequences have been disastrous. According to Northeastern Universitys Center for the Study of Sport in Society nearly 65 of urban teens believe they have a shot at playing pro ball. In fact less than half of 1 of those who even make it to the Division I college level ever make it to the pros. The real story is that two out of three NCAA basketball players having sacrificed their studies to their sport find their scholarships have run out before they have finished their schooling. In the CPBL by contrast a 22-year-old who is beginning to realize he has no career in hoops will still have the wherewithal to get himself a real degree. To date the league has attracted just two team sponsors Internet hub Lycos and Internet service provider Acunet.Net which it will announce Monday. But the plan is for eight teams by November and the PAX family channel has already agreed to broadcast the leagues games. The way Mr. McMann figures it hes not in the basketball business but in the advertising business. The idea is that corporations and even nonprofits might wish to sponsor a team as a way of promoting their brand. If the CPBL is successful it is not too far-fetched to envision colleges one day opting to sponsor a professional team to advertise themselves rather than corrupting their amateur programs. In the meantime the big bucks involved -- the 300 million in TV advertising revenue the multimillion-dollar Nike endorsements the under-the-table money to college players -- provide powerful incentives for university officials and coaches to wink at their players declining academic performances. The virtue of Mr. McManns operation is that it gives a piece of this action to the players who created it along with an academic plan more suited to reality. With but eight months to go before opening tip-off and only two teams signed the CPBL is of course not in the same league as the NCAA. Mr. McMann is betting that this will be his greatest advantage. See related letter: "Letters to the Editor: A Great Coach A Great Educator" -- WSJ April 13 1999 DETAILS Subject: Editorials College basketball Professional basketball People: McMann Paul Company: Collegiate Professional Basketball League National Collegiate Athletic Association NCAA Publication title: Wall Street Journal Eastern edition New York N.Y. Pages: W17 Number of pages: 0 Publication year: 1999 Publication date: Mar 19 1999 Section: WEEKEND JOURNAL Publisher: Dow Jones Company Inc PDF GENERATED BY SEARCH.PROQUEST.COM Page 2 of 3

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LINKS In OneSearch Database copyright 2018 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Contact ProQuest Place of publication: New York N.Y. Country of publication: United States New York N.Y. Publication subject: Business And Economics--Banking And Finance ISSN: 00999660 Source type: Newspapers Language of publication: English Document type: Editorial Accession number: 05465426 ProQuest document ID: 398696014 Document URL: https://search.proquest.com/docview/398696014accountid11979 Copyright: Copyright Dow Jones Company Inc Mar 19 1999 Last updated: 2017-11-02 Database: Business Premium Collection PDF GENERATED BY SEARCH.PROQUEST.COM Page 3 of 3

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