2017-18 - Fighting for the most marginalized Indians

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Oxfam India released its first ever India Inequality Report. This is part of the global Even It Up campaign of Oxfam. At the national level in India, the inequality campaign focuses on evidence based advocacy for increased social spending on public services such as education, health and social protection. https://www.oxfamindia.org/reports/2017-18-fighting-most-marginalized-indians

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ANNUAL REPORT THE FIGHTING FOR THE MOST MARGINALIZED INDIANS BOTTOM LINE

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2 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 OUR AFFILIATES 1. Oxfam America 2. Oxfam Australia 3. Oxfam Belgium 4. Oxfam Brazil 5. Oxfam Canada 6. Oxfam Denmark 7. Oxfam France 8. Oxfam Germany 9. Oxfam Great Britain 10. Oxfam Hong Kong 11. Oxfam India 12. Oxfam Ireland 13. Oxfam Intermon 14. Oxfam Italy 15. Oxfam Japan 16. Oxfam Mexico 17. Oxfam New Zealand 18. Oxfam Novib 19. Oxfam Quebec 20. Oxfam South Africa

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3 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 CHAIRPERSON’S MESSAGE 04 CEO’S MESSAGE 05 THE CONTEXT 07 67 YEARS OF OXFAM 11 12 ECONOMIC JUSTICE ESSENTIAL SERVICES 18 GENDER JUSTICE HUMANITARIAN AND DISASTER RISK REDUCTION 24 PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT GOVERNANCE MANAGEMENT 25 44 PRIVATE SECTOR ENGAGEMENT 46 INDIA AND THE WORLD 48 56 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 57 OPERATIONS 64 OUR LEADERSHIP 58 PARTNERS 84 INDEX 1 2 17 11 15 10 3 6 7 18 13 20 8 4 16 5 19 9 14 12

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4 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 CHAIRPERSON’S MESSAGE This has been a year of change for Oxfam India. After a decade as we marked the milestone of the tenth anniversary of Oxfam India as an integrated entity registered in India our first CEO Nisha Agrawal retired. We will miss her ever-smiling hard-working and very committed presence as also her strong focus on gender and on issues related to the South. The Board initiated steps to select her successor in good time and we were able to find a most fitting one. I am delighted to welcome on-board the new CEO Amitabh Behar an eminent and greatly-respected civil society leader. His dedication to the cause of the disadvantaged and his strong connect with Indian and global CSOs will be invaluable to Oxfam India. We have an extensive programme for 2018-19 as part of our strategy. This includes a review of how we execute and what we can do to improve our performance in relation to the articulated objectives. We have also begun work on re-looking at the overall strategy especially in the context of 2020 when we will put in place a new strategy that takes note of the emerging and evolving scenario and the context within which we function. Amongst the highlights of the year 2017-18 was the release of our first report on inequality in India. ‘Widening Gaps: India Inequality Report 2018’ provides a picture of the current state of inequality in India identifies the reasons behind this situation and presents policy solutions. The report also broke the myth that India is a low-inequality country. Oxfam India’s work on gender included ‘Bano Nayi Soch’ a campaign on social norms which reached out to more than 100000 across five states. Sadly as in past years we had the by-now-usual round of floods necessitating the activating of our humanitarian relief programme. In 2017-18 Oxfam India responded to the flood situation under its humanitarian mandate in Uttar Pradesh Bihar Assam and Manipur in a total of 12 districts. The year-long Disaster Risk Reduction DRR work reduced the vulnerabilities in the pre during and post crisis situation. We reached out to over 100000 people during the responses through Public Health Promotion Activities for improving community hygiene and sanitation practices. Meanwhile the fall-out of global events in the Oxfam federation caused much concern. In India we seem to have weathered the storm but it has affected our fund- raising from some companies especially MNCs and we are greatly worried about any possible cuts in present grants - and commitments for the future made to us - by sister organisations within the federation. In anticipation of difficulties we have greatly tightened our budgets and are meticulously monitoring costs. Simultaneously fund-raising has been given a fresh impetus and thrust. During 2017-18 our total income was Rs. 57.21 crore as against Rs. 58.53 crore in 2016-17 reflecting a decline of 2. I would like to convey my sincere appreciation to Oxfam International and fellow Oxfam affiliates for their on-going help and commitment to Oxfam India. Our partners across India continue to be a source of exceptional strength and I thank them for their dedication and cooperation. As in past years my colleagues on the Board provided tremendous support. Their guidance and inputs have been invaluable. Finally I congratulate Nisha Agrawal her senior management team and all our staff who through their hard work dedication and passion are engaged in bringing about a better world a vision that the team will continue to take forward under the leadership of Amitabh Behar. We are committed to redoubling our eforts in fghting the injustice of inequality along all the many dimensions that it manifests itself in india including income and wealth geography caste religion and of course gender. KIRAN KARNIK Chairperson Oxfam India Board

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5 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 CEO’S MESSAGE Last year we deepened the implementation of our new strategy for FY 2016-20 “Demanding Rights and Creating Opportunities”. The focus was more on turning the focus on widening inequalities especially in the area of gender justice. In February 2018 Oxfam India released its first ever India Inequality Report. The report argued that contrary to popular perception India is a high inequality country by global standards. Inequality in India is multi- dimensional: There are inequalities in wealth income and consumption as well as structural inequalities of opportunity region and social groups. Further what is worrying is that inequality has been on the rise over the last 3 decades. What makes inequality a particularly volatile and potentially disrupting phenomenon in India is because of the existence of structural and historical inequalities in the society. During the year we continued our journey through the thematic areas we work on. Oxfam India through its partner grass roots agencies was involved in facilitating developing models of community-based monitoring management of schools public health facilities creating common platforms for village district and state level networks towards improving access to quality health education services. OIN partners were instrumental in enrolling 3000 children in schools in 2017-18. Our ‘Access to Medicines’ campaign in Bihar and Odisha was received well by the people and the government. It involved working with CSOs and health networks to demand state governments to implement ‘Free medicine schemes’ to ensure access to medicine on a sustainable basis through public health facilities. In 2017-18 OIN took forward the “Bano Nayi Soch” campaign in our focus states. Oxfam India responded to the flood situation under its humanitarian mandate in Uttar Pradesh Bihar Assam and Manipur during the year. With the humanitarian response the yearlong DRR work reduced the vulnerabilities to the pre during and post crisis situation. Our interventions supported around 101544 people during floods. In our Private Sector Engagement work as a result of our continuing advocacy with regulatory bodies both the national stock exchanges launched dedicated indices based on environment sustainability and governance ESG factors. Through our Economic Justice work 554 new Individual Forest Rights IFR claims were submitted and 4300 IFR claims were followed up for recognition. The community groups were successful in getting 13 Community Forest Rights CFR claims. The civil society arena is also undergoing dramatic transitions and we as an INGO have added challenges. In this context we do need to take a pause from doing routine things and re-visualize our role and responsibilities. During 2017-18 our total income was Rs. 57.21 crore as against Rs. 58.53 crore in 2016-17. We continued to work in 105 districts of six states with 132 partners around our themes with special focus on Muslims Dalits Tribals and Women. This has been a difficult year for Oxfam globally. The serious allegations of sexual misconduct in Haiti and questions emerging from it have shaken up the entire system. Many believe that for a value driven organization like Oxfam which took leadership in terms of norm setting in diverse arenas with a particular emphasis of the rights of women across the world is a broken system after the shock. Oxfam certainly is shaken but far from being devastated I see a tremendous resolve to rebuild. Importantly there is acknowledgement across the system that we first need to recognize the issue at hand understand the procedural and systemic causes along with deeper culture issues and simultaneously work towards ensuring justice for the local Haiti communities and other stakeholders. This is an honest and sincere attempt to transform the Oxfam system. On behalf of Oxfam India I would like to thank each and every donor individuals and institutions for their trust and support for our work. Their continued support We continued to work in 105 districts of six states with 132 partners around our themes with special focus on Muslims Dalits Tribals and Women. AMITABH BEHAR Chief Executive Officer Oxfam India

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6 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 Amitabh Behar enables us to work towards our ambitious goals of dignity and justice. I would also like to thank our supporter peers and co-travelers who walk with us and strengthen our work through collective energies and commitment. Any note of thanks is incomplete without acknowledging the work our partners do on the frontlines. We do share a deep bond of shared vision and mission with our partners which enables us to walk the difficult and challenging path tirelessly. A big thanks to all our partners. The board continued to guide us with their sagely advise and backstopping support as and when we needed their help. A sense of gratitude to the team of Oxfam spread across India as they work tirelessly and with unending passion to achieve our organizational goals. Let me end this foreword with a deep sense of appreciation and gratitude to Nisha Agrawal. She has very ably steered Oxfam India through the last ten years and I am extremely fortunate as a leader to inherit a very steady ship from her. Nisha in her decade as the CEO of Oxfam India achieved several milestones and has set the foundations of a very strong organization. This was not an easy journey and entailed multiple challenges both internal and external. She overcame all these challenges and set Oxfam India on a course from where we can make lasting contribution to help people lead a life with dignity. It is a personal privilege to be able to write this foreword on behalf of the organization as this annual report documents the work done by Oxfam India in the year 2017-18. I joined at the beginning of the financial year 2018-19. It is surely is huge honor and privilege to lead Oxfam India. However I also see this as a huge responsibility in terms of measuring up to the high standards of Oxfam globally and more importantly in making a powerful contribution in our daily struggles for justice and dignity for all. We would be very happy to hear from you and greatly appreciate any feedback that you might have for this annual report or for our work. I am sure your wisdom and advise would help us make become more effective and strengthen our resolve to build a just and peaceful future for all. In solidarity

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7 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 CONTEXT In the 2018 Oxfam India released its first ever India Inequality Report. This is part of the global Even It Up campaign of Oxfam. At the national level in India the inequality campaign focuses on evidence based advocacy for increased social spending on public services such as education health and social protection. It also tries to influence the Government to adopt progressive taxation policies in which corporations and the richest individuals are taxed more in order to redistribute resources in society and ensure that increased share of direct taxes are spent for social development. The India Inequality Report is an outcome of this advocacy effort. Over the years the world has witnessed rising inequality. Globally in 2017 the world has witnessed the biggest increase in the number of billionaires: one billionaire every 2 days and a total of 2043 billionaires world-wide as of January 2018. In 2017 eighty-two percent of total global growth went to the top 1 while bottom 50 saw no increase. This figure is sufficient to wipe out extreme poverty globally seven times over. As of November 2017 42 people own the same wealth as the bottom 3.7 billion people. Consequently a global narrative on inequality has emerged. India is not alien to such rising trends in inequality where 73 of total national wealth generated in 2017 went to the top 1 of the population. The India Inequality Report 2018 argues that contrary to popular perception India is a high inequality country by global standards. Inequality in India is multi- dimensional: There are inequalities in wealth income and consumption as well as structural inequalities of opportunity region and social groups. Further what is worrying is that inequality has been on the rise over the last 3 decades. Why inequality matters to India Inequality matters because of the following reasons: Recent research conducted across the world shows that persistent high inequality diminishes long- term economic growth. One way this happens is that inequality reduces the opportunities for education for the poor which in turn keeps the quality and quantum of human capital suppressed and also curbs technical specialization. Inequality could also impact a poorer individual’s health negatively and diminish productivity and subsequently economic growth. The greater focus on inequality thus is clear from the shift in the policy discourse to ‘inclusive growth’. The study of inequality is all the more important in a situation of ‘jobless growth’ in the economy where even the jobs that are generated are largely in the unorganised sector or informal jobs in the organised sector. The phenomenon is particularly vexing since it paints a misleading picture of economic growth while simultaneously limiting the opportunity for upward socio- economic mobility for large swathes of the population. There is also the question of how the gains from growth are distributed among the vulnerable sections of the population and across the states of the country. Rising inequality usually correlates with a slower rate of poverty reduction which is associated with poorer public health limited educational opportunities and higher crime rates. All these outcomes place additional burdens on the economy and the wider political system whereby there is an increased threat to political stability and property rights while capital accumulation is discouraged. Political power is typically captured by the wealthy in high income inequality nations which allows the upper

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8 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18

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9 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 segment of the population to wield a disproportionate amount of decision-making power which could encourage the establishment of inefficient tax structures and other policies skewed in favour of the wealthy. A widening chasm between rich and poor also increases the rate of rent-seeking and predatory market behaviour which adversely impact economic growth. The issues stemming from high inequality are important to policymakers as inequality poses bottlenecks in the path of growth through reduced economic opportunity inadequate technical education poor health leading to lower productivity a corrosion in bargaining power and political influence for poorer segments. Our study shows that inequality is high and rising on account of consumption income and wealth. All-India consumption Gini coefficient has increased from 0.30 in 1983 to 0.36 in 2011-12. Urban gini is driving the overall inequality which has seen a rapid rise from 0.31 in 1983 to 0.38 in 2011-12. Common to both rural and urban areas the topmost deciles witnessed faster rates of growth in their real consumption expenditure after 1991. This was unlike the 1980s when the lowest deciles experienced faster increases in rural areas. Between 1983 and 2012 while the urban bottom 40 witnessed an increase of real MPCE monthly per capita expenditure by 51 the urban top 20 witnessed an increase of 98. There is also increasing divergence between the consumption expenditures of different occupational groups with slower increases among the vulnerable sections such as agricultural labourers and other labour households and casual labour households in urban areas. With respect to income inequality the available data is more limited but still shows a rising trend since 2004- 05. Top 10 percent in India had an average income that was 13 times higher than the bottom 10 in 2004-05. This rose to 14.2 times in 2011-12. Top 10 of wage earners accounted for 35 of total wage income in 1983. This increased to 40 by 2011-12. Share of bottom 50 declined to 18 percent in 2011-12 from 19 in 1983. Bottom 50 experienced wage growth rate of 97 between 1980 and 2014 while the top 10 saw a 376 increase over the same period. Similarly the data on the distribution of wealth shows that wealth inequality has increased since 1991 and the value of assets follow the hierarchy of the caste

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10 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 structure and occupational groups. In 2010 27 out of 69 Indian billionaires accumulated their wealth from rent- thick sectors which require natural resources or depend on the state for licenses. The real-estate billionaires joined the club between 2005 and 2010 they have also enjoyed the fastest rates of accumulation of their wealth. While rent-thick billionaires accounted for 43 of all billionaires the wealth they owned accounted for 60 of total billionaire wealth. Clearly the wealthiest in India have made their fortunes from crony capitalism rather than through innovation or the rules of the market. What makes inequality a particularly volatile and potentially disrupting phenomenon in India is because of the existence of structural and historical inequalities in society. In a more-or-less homogenous society economic inequalities have limits to disrupt the socio- political fabric. However in a society such as India which is ridden with structural and historical inequalities such as cast religion region etc. the potential of inequality to disrupt the equilibrium of the society is immense. If we look at inequality across states social and religious groups spatial inequalities remained stagnant until the 1980s but rapidly increased after 1991. Considering the income/consumption/wealth shares of different social groups it shows that members of the Scheduled Castes/ Tribes had lower shares relative to their population shares in 1993-94 this continues to be the case even after two decades. Among religious groups this is the case for Muslims the shares have declined for this group over the period. One of the outcomes of high and persistent economic inequality is the deprivation that households face in accessing basic services such as health nutrition and education. There is a clear imbalance in nutrition where children of SC/ST communities have worse nutritional indicators than those of the forward caste communities they also have a slower decline in their malnutrition prevalence. This continues to be the case in 2015-16. Although there have been improvements across groups over the last decade the nutritional gap between social groups has hardly changed. The figures for educational attainment also show multiple dimensions of deprivation that various groups face. This was clear in the disparity in literacy rates and drop-out rates by social group gender and sector. These are clear indications of inequalities even in the completion of basic and primary education. The declining female labour force participation rate along with the gender wage gap and unequal access to decent employment opportunities has exacerbated the economic and social disparities on gender lines. In conclusion we argue that the rapid rise in inequality is neither inevitable nor harmless. Societies with higher inequality tend to have poorly-functioning public services. This is reflected in India’s low social sector expenditures on education and health. The experiences of many other countries show that inequality can be reduced through public action. India has much to learn from these experiences in ensuring financial inclusion and tax-compliance removing corporate loan waivers and tax exemptions introducing wealth and inheritance taxes and enacting legislations to provide access to the basic entitlements of the citizens.

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11 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 OXFAM IS MARKING ITS 67TH YEAR IN INDIA THIS YEAR. IN 1951 OXFAM GREAT BRITAIN CAME TO INDIA DURING THE BIHAR FAMINE TO LAUNCH ITS FIRST FULLSCALE HUMANITARIAN RESPONSE IN A DEVELOPING COUNTRY. Over the past 66 years Oxfam has supported civil society organisations across the length and breadth of the country. In 2008 all Oxfams working in India came together to form Oxfam India a fully independent Indian organisation with Indian staff and an Indian Board which is a member of a global confederation of 20 Oxfams. 67 YEARS OF OXFAM IN INDIA OUR VISION Oxfam’s vision is a just world without poverty a world in which people can influence the decisions that affect their lives enjoy their rights and assume their responsibilities as full citizens of a world in which all human beings are valued and treated equally. The purpose of Oxfam is to help create lasting solutions to addrss the injustice of poverty. We have to create a society for all where equality prevails and every individual can exhibit his/her right to a safe and happy life. COMMITMENT TO OUR VISION AND PURPOSE HONESTY AND INTEGRITY INCLUSIVENESS SECULARISM AND PLURALISM RESPECT AND VALUE FOR PEOPLE’S RIGHTS HIGH QUALITY RESULTS AND ACCOUNTABILITY TO STAKEHOLDERS OUR MISSION OUR VALUES RIGHT TO SUSTAINABLE LIVELIHOOD RIGHT TO LIFE AND SECURITY RIGHT TO IDENTITY RIGHT TO ESSENTIAL SERVICES RIGHT TO BE HEARD

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12 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 ECONOMIC JUSTICE GOAL Envisioning improved livelihoods for forest dependent communities through rights over natural resources specifcally land minerals and energy In 2017-18 554 new IFR claims were submitted and 4300 IFR claims were followed up for recognition. The community groups were successful in getting 13 CFR claims. Awareness and training programs conducted in our focus states reached to 75237 women and men increasing their knowledge on FRA and CFR management. 2684 women farmers from 35 project villages Munger and Bhagalpur have been organized into 150 producer groups.

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13 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 CONTRIBUTION TOWARDS OUTCOMES IN YEAR 2017- 2018 IMPLEMENTATION OF FOREST RIGHTS ACT Oxfam India through its Economic Justice theme engages with marginalized communities in remote tribal areas of the country simultaneously ensuring that the voices from the grass-roots find a platform where these are heard and issues emanating from the work find audience in the larger civil society and government institutions and systems. The program also aims to improve livelihoods of marginalized communities tribals and other forest dependent communities through rights over natural resources specifically land minerals and energy. The programme works towards improving capacities of communities and their institutions to assert their forest rights and strengthen their livelihoods through the implementation of legislations like Forest Rights Act 2006 FRA and Mines and Minerals Development and Regulation Amendment Act 2015 MMDR. It also seeks to work with local and national networks and media to generate evidences of noncompliance of laws and policies that lead to violation of land and human rights. At the micro level the programme works with communities in three central eastern states of India - Jharkhand Chhattisgarh and Odisha – on building their capacities to claim their rights and sustainable manage their forests as well to empower them to exercise the principle of Free Prior and Informed Consent FPIC in cases of land diversion. Once community forest rights are granted the focus is on capacity building of communities to develop Community Forest Management and Conservation Plans and advocate on policy changes regarding monopoly over sale and pricing of minor forest produce. Along with other technical agencies the programme is trying to develop a comprehensible framework which can be adopted and used by the gram sabhas. Lack of quality access to energy for lighting cooking and livelihoods is a huge issue in these villages located inside forests. Although the Government of India under its fast track village electrification programme claims to have electrified 16448 villages leaving only 881 un-electrified now www.garv.gov.in as seen on 9th Mar 2018 access of electricity at household level is still a big gap. Quality of supply and affordability are still concerns that are unanswered. The programme is working towards integrating renewable energy solutions to support subsistence agriculture and other productive uses such as value addition of minor forest produces MFPs. One of the crucial work of the EJ theme is to ensure the implementation of the forest rights act for years. To understand the status of the FRA Oxfam India commissioned a study with Tata Institute of Social sciences with focus on Rights recognition process under Forest Rights Act: reasons of rejection and impact of rights recognised on livelihood. According to the study out of 1703 individual titles 80 titles have women names as joint titleholder. 4.6 titles are in the name of widows less than 1 titles belongs to single women. Below is the update of our intervention for implementation of FRA. •In Raipur April 2017 to March 2018 318 households in project villages of Gariyaband Rajnandgaon Dhamtari and Surguja districts received IFR titles on 119.203 ha of forest land after filed revised claim through their respective Gram Sabha. While earlier these claims were rejected on fallacious ground. Between April to March 2018 approx. Rs 453.09 lakh received for rural housing and land development on forest land recognized under FRA in project villages due to constant follow-up and the recommendation of Gram Sabhas. •Similarly in Bhubaneshwar Community claim process completed in 8 villages of 20 villages in Keonjhar. Verification completed and submitted to DLC. •In Jharkhand total 81 IFR title 59.76 acre in Godda district and 35 IFR title 23.52 acre and 1 CFR title 68.94 acre of Chalkarikala village of Bishnugarh block of Hazaribagh district got approved received patta. Furthermore CFR of 7 villages had been processed for claim at gram sabha and 11 villages revenue map had been recovered for processing of Sunderpahari block of Godda district. In Hazribagh 6 CFR were reclaimed and submitted. To ensure that the Communities are aware of their rights as well as status of their claims community centers were established where FRA related information were displayed and discussed and later being advocated with the government official. In Raipur 27 such Gram Sabha Kendra was established. Similarly in Bhubaneshwar a Panchayat level FRA facilitation center in the field location

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14 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 of Keonjhar District which helped number of community members to get undated information on the forest rights act. Whereas in Jharkhand 2 ‘Van Adhikar Sahayata Kendra’ a legal help desk in Giridih Hazaribagh district with support of community contribution was successfully LIVELIHOOD SUPPORT ADVOCACY opened. Oxfam India with its partners ensured that communities have enough livelihood options throughout the year. Under this Oxfam India took the initiative to organise an exposure visit for the partner organisations from the States of Jharkhand Chhattisgarh and Odisha representatives of the communities and the Oxfam India regional and national staff to visit the field area of Udyogini in Jharkhand. Udyogini has been working on the issue of value addition to forest based products like Lac and tamarind through women managed business enterprises and cooperatives. The team visited Indian Institute of Natural Resins Gums IINRG Ranchi to understand the Lac processing. Also in Bhubaneshwar 80 women from 40 SHGs were trained on business plan and out of them 14 have started their business as per plan and getting livelihood benefits. The women are engaged in vegetable cultivation in FRA land rice processing and Tamarind value addition which fetches a monthly income of Rs 2500-3000/- Rupees. In an another effort FRC members of the Golamunda block Kalahandi District mobilized Rs. 10 Lakhs for Construction of Cooperative Facilitation Centre CFC in Golamunda Block of Kalahandi. In Jharkhand 3 new NTFP based aggregation and value chain model had been established to strengthen a sustainable and replicable community led rural business unit which is successfully supporting community in accessing market and getting fair value of produce. In order to do the advocacy a national consultation was undertaken with civil society groups with the media to highlight how the provisions of CAF have been misused and FRA has been violated. A charter of demands was sent to the nodal ministries. Furthermore the members of CFRLA met various elected representatives during the winter parliamentary session to discuss on the CAF issues and issue related to order by National Tiger Conservation Authority wherein they had arbitrarily declared that the rights under FRA 2006 Forest Rights Act need not be recognised in Tiger Reserves. Also CFRLA developed a community based framework for the conservation and management of the forest. This framework has been adopted by the State Government of Maharashtra and guidelines issued for Gram sabhas to prepare the conservation and management plan in the State where community rights have been realised. In Raipur 5 meetings of state level network was organized. Network submitted a memorandum to Chief Secretary demanding for speedy implementation of forest rights. Due to this memorandum The Chief Secretary has written to all District Collectors ensuring speedy redressal of pending claims and issuance of CFR titles. A state level consultation on benefit sharing of affected communities through DMF was organized in which DMF trust members academician and researcher media representatives activists trade union representatives participated to discuss the impact of mining need of benefit sharing and the accountability of DMFs. Also 3 groups are constituted in Korba Raigarh and Ambikapur to follow up with DMF trust using right to information RTI to extract necessary information sharing information with journalist and mobilising community to get their plan accepted at DMF. In Bhubaneshwar Oxfam India with the facilitation support of the partner organization ‘WOSCA’ organised a bilateral discussion with the district level government officials to discuss on the magnitude of collection and utilization under the District Mineral Foundation DMF. A factsheet on DMF has been developed which is to be circulated among different organisations and forums. In Jharkhand to advocate and monitor the FRA rights and post IFR/CFR claims 8 federations at district/block level had been formed in Hazaribagh Giridih Godda districts. The success of their advocacy effort was fruited in an incident mentioned below

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15 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 WOMEN FARMERS LEADING NEW TECHNOLOGY IN CULTIVATION Ramni a women farmer is a leading member of the group Om Mahila Sewa Sabji Utpadak Samooh formed by SEWA Bharat. Her family owns an acre of land in Bhagalpur district Bihar. The prime occupation of her family is the cultivation of cereals including vegetables. Before joining the SEWA group her family’s income was low due to low yield and high input cost. This was due to the lack of knowledge of new technology in agricultural practices. Since Ramni joined hand with the innovative programme of SEWA after attending regular meetings and trainings she was convinced to adopt new technology in vegetable cultivation. After which she became ready for demonstration in the field for vegetable cultivation with new technology. She finally chose potato cultivation for demonstration in about 8 Kattha 0.25 Ac of her land. She was also trained in sustainable agricultural practices and new agriculture innovation including seed treatment pest management vermi-composting nutrient management balance doze of fertilizer. She CHANGE STORY even received proper guidance in the drip irrigation system. During the training emphasis on storage grading sorting to increase the marketability of the produce was also given. It helped them choose the market according to the type of product. Ramni followed all the instruction that led to an increase in the production. Such interventions through Oxfam India helps empower women farmer like Ramni to gain knowledge and training to yield a good income and live self-sustainable life. Note: Yield rate of Potato in this village normally varies from 90-100 Qnt per acre. Therefore about 30 percent of the Potato production has been increased after following the recommended package of practice.

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17 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18

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18 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 ESSENTIAL SERVICES GOAL Financing for Development and Universal Essential Services: By 2020 Inequality takes center stage of the development discourse leading to increased public fnancing people’s access to universal free quality health care and education The year 2017-18 has been transformative for the Essential Services theme of Oxfam India in many ways which include innovative thematic interventions at district state and national levels participation in the ‘Even it Up’ campaign at national and international levels and development of a design which has restructured the functioning of the theme for next three years. In the February 2018 Oxfam India released its first ever India Inequality Report. This is part of the global ‘Even It Up’ campaign of Oxfam. At the national level in India the inequality campaign focuses on evidence based advocacy for increased social spending on public services such as education health and social protection. The India Inequality Report 2018 argues that contrary to popular perception India is a high inequality country by global standards. Inequality in India is multi- dimensional: There are inequalities in wealth income and consumption as well as structural inequalities of INEQUALITY CAMP AIGN opportunity region and social groups. Further what is worrying is that inequality has been on the rise over the last 3 decades. Simultaneously policy briefs have been developed on Corporate Tax Evasion Wealth Taxes and Inheritance Taxes to show that apart from bridging the economic gap redistributive policies linked to resources generated out of progressive tax systems can effectively strengthen financing of public education and health and can have intergenerational impact in the process of reducing inequality. Release and dissemination of the reports and public and media engagement under the umbrella inequality campaign have helped positioning Oxfam India as a champion of ‘inequality’ issue. While the year 2017-18 has been foundational in shaping the ES theme for future years there have been some significant tangible results achieved in the focus areas of education and health as highlighted below:

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19 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 OIN partners were instrumental in enrolling 3000 children in schools in 2017-18. Over 14200 SMC school management committees members were engaged through the state forums on advocacy and awareness on compliance of RTE Act. SMC federation has been formed in Uttar Pradesh Bihar Jharkhand and Chhattisgarh. 524 teachers were supported and trained on various teaching methodologies. 120 school development plans were prepared with active participation from SMC and community leaders. We were successful in making 400 schools functional in terms of quality education infrastructure MDM etc. Learning level of 4057 children got improved with the usage of teaching learning materials and support classes. The remedial support provided to children focusing on enhancing their learning level in language mathematics and EVS proved very useful for the children. This has bought back the enthusiasm of the children who were drop out from school to re enrol themselves. As a result 2700 children were re-enrolled new and dropped out in various schools. In 2017- 18 education programme focused on establishing a stronger link between policy campaign and advocacy as well as the on ground programming. As part of this initiative Oxfam worked on the issues and dangers of scrapping the No Detention Policy proposed under The Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Second Amendment Bill 2017. The team initiated offline and online campaign LearningOverFailing SayNoToDention asking people to take action by requesting their parliamentarians and standing committee members to withdraw the bill. This campaign aims to benefit the children from the marginalized communities in Bihar Jharkhand Uttar Pradesh Chhattisgarh and Odisha. The campaign also plans to mobilize the general public to demand for withdrawal of the amendment bill. As part of the offline campaign a round of NDP consultations group discussions and advocacy meetings activities were conducted in Odisha Bihar Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand in collaboration with Right to Education forums other civil society organizations academia and the communities. This was followed by state level recommendations submitted to the concerned state parliamentarians. Oxfam India joined the delegation of members of the national RTE Forum and made submission on NDP in front of the Parliamentary Standing Committee of the HRD at the Parliament House in New Delhi on 24th Nov 2017. This was followed by online campaign by releasing two videos and asking audience to sign the petition. Through online the campaign reached out to over one lakh online individuals and over eighteen thousand individuals took action by signing the petition. Odisha UP and Jharkhand states have worked closely with the RTE forum and have developed the status reports on the implementation of Right to Education Act in the respective states. During the year partnerships were established with 11 organisations across Bihar Chhattisgarh Jharkhand Odisha U.P. Delhi and national level to mobilise community action in advocating for educational rights of the marginalized monitoring the implementation of provisions under the RTE Act in public schools and advocating strengthening financing implementation and grievance redressal systems in public education at block district state and national levels. Besides an innovative project targeting mobilization of youth media and civil society towards building a narrative against the ill consequences of rising inequality was launched. As a core institutional member of the National RTE Forum Oxfam India has initiated focused work on strengthening the governance and overall functioning of the forum and its collaboration with the state level RTE Forums in the focus states. In this regard regional planning meetings with state forums were initiated that focused on supporting state forums in identifying issues to campaign in 2018. Technical and managerial support has been provided to the National RTE Forum in the process of formation and capacity building of an RTE cadre involving youth the school management committee members non-SMC community members and general public to advocate on specific issues under the RTE Act. With an objective to understand inequalities in public elementary education system from social ie. Caste gender religion and economic perspective class region a national level study has been commissioned. The findings of the study will provide the technical intellectual base for the upcoming campaigns on inequality and education as planned for the future years under the integrated programme of the ES theme.

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20 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 HEALTH 106 Gaon Kalyan Samitis were engaged for Access to medicine campaign and other advocacy efforts at village and block level. We have reached to 57776 community members on the issues of health services in our intervention areas. Through our intensive campaign on access to medicine we have reached to 6 lakhs people in 23 districts of our focus states. 35 Primary health centers were made functional. KEY HIGHLIGHTS Two Campaign spikes on access to free essential medicines known as ATM campaign in short were carried out in states of Bihar and Odisha in the period April- May 2017 and January-March 2018 and in Chhattisgarh between November 2017 to March 2018. These campaign covered 15 districts in Bihar 14 in Odisha and 10 districts in Chhattisgarh reaching out to over 6000000 people in these states. The campaign was done collaboration with Jan Swasthya Abhiyan JSA and other Health Networks. The campaign was designed to create awareness among general mass and strengthen communities’ voice for availing their rights for free medicine and diagnostic facilities. It involved working with CSOs and health networks to demand state governments to implement ‘Free medicine schemes’ to ensure access to medicine on a sustainable basis through public health facilities. The campaign had a clear cut ask for the state governments to allocate substantial share of state budget for free medicines and diagnostic facilities. Evidence was generated through essential medicine surveys tracking and exit interviews of patients and presented during state and district level consultations and used for advocacy at various levels – village district and state with the public government officials media civil society organizations intelligentsia etc. In Bihar the name of the campaign on essential medicines carried out under the tagline of HaqBantaHai campaign was “Struggle from 14 to 40” with an ask to increase the per person per capita government expenditure on medicines from Rs. 14 to Rs. 40. As a result of the campaign the then Finance Minister Government of Bihar committed to provision INR 500 crore in the budget of Bihar for year 2018-19. He committed that GoB will strive to spend Rs. 40 per person per capita during FY 2018-19. In Odisha over 1000 letters written by the community members were posted to the Chief Minister’s office in Odisha demanding free medicines and free diagnostic services at the health centers and faster transportation services. Post the campaign spike the State Health Minister ordered for the display of information including CDMOs contact number in all the public health centres. The national political parties in Odisha invited Oxfam India to make presentation on the campaign in their Economic Affairs Committee meeting. In Chhattisgarh in partnership with the state JSA the data generated from active tracking of stock of essential medicines in public hospitals in 56 facilities of 10 districts has been used for state level advocacy with high media outreach. Various stakeholders like Chhattisgarh Medicine Services Corporation CGMSC Chhattisgarh State AIDS Control Society CGSACS CBOs and patients organisations were brought together for joint consultations. During one consultation the Chhattisgarh Positive People’s Network raised concerns related to shortage and non-procurement of HIV/AIDS medicines and related consumables as a result of which a three month inventory of the required items were procured and distributed by the state health department. Additionally through training and survey on medicines the capacities of civil society organisations have been built around the issue of medicines. Regional consultations have been held in order to build solidarity and a campaign around the Right to health and health equity. A series of consultations were held with state JSAs different health organisations and experts in Uttar Pradesh Chhattisgarh and Odisha to understand the issues and topics of advocacy were identified which fed into the design of the integrated inequality campaign of Oxfam India. Oxfam India conducted a survey on the availability of free essential medicines in 20 districts in the state with an objective to understand the situation and if needed develop intervention measures in future. To support the inequality campaign at national and global levels stories on access to public health were collected and two films on health and inequality were made. One of the films highlighted the functioning of Mohalla clinics in Delhi and the other the universal health coverage issues

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21 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 in the context of Odisha. With a shift in the government’s policy towards delivery of healthcare services in the country promoting private healthcare sector and its rapid growth raises concern on the poor regulation lack of standardisation quality of care norms and costs of treatment across the wide-spectrum of private players in the health sector. In this context Oxfam India commissioned a policy brief on regulation of private healthcare sector in India in 2017 to add to the existing body of knowledge on the issue and provided recommendations on role of private players in health sector and the role of public sector in regulation of private healthcare. Megha was always keen to attend school but with hardly any money to survive her parents stopped her from going to school. Every morning Megha would assist her parents in collecting leaves to earn a living. While in the evenings she would look after her siblings and learn domestic skills. Oxfam India with its partner organization undertook a project and conducted a survey in Odisha villages to identify dropouts and out-of-school children. They also carried counselling sessions on the importance of education for parents. Workshops were conducted to create awareness on the Right to Education RtE Act as also regular meetings with child cabinet and School Management Committee SMC in village and schools. When Oxfam India recognized Megha as a dropout she was enrolled in a learning program. It was observed that she was afraid to communicate with teachers due to language barriers. Megha was unable to follow Odia language. Oxfam India helped in appointing a language teacher in the school. As part of the project several child-centric activities and teaching-learning activities in tribal language were facilitated in the school. Regular classroom transactions in local language helped Megha to achieve minimum learning competencies and encouraged her to attend school regularly. Megha now in class five is a confident girl being able to write and read in Odia language. She has also fared well in other curricular activities such as singing and sports. Recently she was awarded by the school for her multiple talents both at Panchayat and Block level. Oxfam India continues to conduct systematic and focused interventions in the most marginalized communities that will help in enrolling drop out children in school and become champions. Name changed to protect identity. CHANGE STORY

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24 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 GENDER JUSTICE GOAL By 2020 more poor marginalized women will claim advance their rights and violence against women is less prevalent. The Advancing Gender Justice program works towards the goal that ‘more poor and marginalized women claim and advance their rights through the engagement and leadership of women and their organizations and violence against women is significantly less socially acceptable and prevalent’. Violence against women and girls VAWG is partly a result of gender relations that assumes men are superior to women. Given the subordinate status of women much of VAWG is considered normal and enjoys social sanction. There is a need to challenge structures and ideologies that justify and perpetuate gender inequality and power imbalances and that is possible through the vision of transformative leadership for women’s rights TLWR. This form of leadership promotes gender justice by advancing women’s participation and leadership.While the year 2017-18 has been foundational in shaping the ES theme for future years there have been some significant tangible results achieved in the focus areas of education and health as highlighted below: 1420 cases of domestic violence were handled by our women support centers and community- based committees in 2017-18. Reached to 23480 youth through 101 educational institutes colleges and Universities on the issue of gender social norms. 20054 Women and men have received training on various laws schemes and acts and are leading community actions at various levels in claiming their rights. 1100 women survivors were supported for accessing government schemes and 800 women survivors were linked to livelihood. OIN partners have reached to more than 1 lakh men women boys and girls on the issues of violence against women in 2017-18 through various activities events and public engagement programs in intervention areas. KEY HIGHLIGHTS

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25 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 2017-18 has been a year of great gains for women’s struggles the world over. With increasing stories of sexual harassment in the film industry academia including the aid sector the MeToo campaign has finally brought attention to the underlying social norms that perpetuate gender based discrimination and violence. Oxfam India continued it focus on bring about normative change in the year of 2017-18. Bano Nayi Soch Oxfam India’s campaign on social norms reached out to over 100000 people across the five states. Focusing on young women and men across the age group of 18-29 years the attempt was to challenge and change norms that inhibit women from participants actively in decision making within the family and community. One key strategy that OIN and partners adopted is the mobilisation of young people in the villages colleges and universities in large numbers to understand the links between social norms discrimination and violence. Under the banner of Bano Nayi Soch campaign in Chhattisgarh Oxfam India organized an event in collaboration with Pt. Ravishankar University Indira Kala and Sangit Vishwavidyalaya and Centre for Women’s studies. With this cultural event 1200 students were reached and sensitized on the issue of gender discrimination and Empowerment. Also with effort of The RAHAT network partners in Bihar a Police Paramarsh Kendra has been established at Kishanganj SP office which gives counselling to the violence related issues. Gender Resource Centre GRC Bihar launched a campaign ‘Soch Badlo’ in schools of Patna after Bano Nayi Soch campaign activities were conducted in colleges of Patna and Vaishali. Also SDM department appreciated the Sexual Reproductive Health Rights toolkit developed by DRR and GJ and showed their interest in training stakeholders across the state of Bihar. In Uttar Pradesh 1500 youth from more than 40 colleges and universities got mobilized on the issue of VAWG and gender social norm. The state Women and Child Development Minister Prof. Rita Bahuguna Joshi gave positive message and urged youth to become vocal on the issue of VAWG. In Odisha: - 6 youth festivals were organized in three districts through which engagement happened with 590 young minds. - 4 university level youth festivals in four universities and

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26 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 1 inter-university level youth festival were organized in which nearly 770 young minds were sensitized. - A Collaboration was made with Odia TV channel for disseminating successful and challenging stories from the community. In this regard 12 episodes comprising different issues of gender justice were collected and telecasted the local electronic channel which generated discourse around the issue. Our partners have begun a continuous engagement with these young people. In order to build a larger narrative of positive norms Oxfam India helped develop a small booklet on the relevant laws around domestic violence and child marriage as a supplement to a leading Hindi journal with a high readership throughout our focus states. It also shared few case studies of champions who are already challenging the existing norms. Oxfam also collaborated with a leading radio channel and Hindi newspaper to lend their support to the cause of challenging social norms. Young artists were asked to share their perspectives on violence against women and girls. These paintings were then shared with the millennials in collaboration with an online magazine. Many young people were interested in knowing or sharing about diverse issues such as ideas related to masculinity and its harm on the men division of labour and how we could overcome the power dynamics that patriarch has created. Oxfam along with our partners also experimented with an accountability mechanism to reach out to community influencers like the panchayat leaders the service providers in order to show them the situation of violence in their communities. The media was also a stakeholder that we have engaged with to build more gender sensitive reporting. In order to also engage with larger institutions that help create social norms Oxfam India continued it engagement with the Bollywood film industry as part of the second edition of the Mumbai Film Festival ‘Best Award for Gender Sensitive Films’. Many women actors rendered their opinions on the existing biases within the film industry. Hearing a story of grit determination and courage from a young articulate and feisty survivor of violence changed their perception to the need such support. Oxfam and its partners continued to raise issues related to the implementation of laws pertaining to domestic violence and child marriage. A Charter of Demands was developed in consultation with many women’s organisations and networks for the better implementation of the Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act PWDVA 2005. This has been shared with the policy makers by individual organisations and networks. Oxfam and our partners continued to provide support to women experiencing violence in their lives. During the year 1420 cases of domestic violence were handled by our women support centers and community-based committees. With the commitment to provide support services to the survivors and with the continued engagement and advocacy following achievements were made last year. In Chhattisgarh support was provided to 273 women and girls who experienced violence. Out of this 194 cases i.e. 71 cases have been resolved due to the initiative of the support centers in the project districts in Raipur. In Uttar Pradesh Oxfam partner is selected as the NGO representative of Internal Complaints Committee of “Woman Power Line 1090” established by Uttar Pradesh government for prevention of atrocities against women. Azamgarh police invited Oxfam partner to orient their staff on Child protection and related Laws including child marriage prohibition Juvenile Justice Act and Prevention of Child from Sexual Offence POCSO. In Odisha A total of 672 cases of violence have been dealt with by 4 Women Support Centres of 4 districts out of which 56 of cases have been reconciled through counselling. 37 cases have been facilitated to file DIR under PWDV Act. 11 women survivors have been linked with economic services 4 by ISD and 7 by NAWO out of which 7 were linked to SBI’s skill training on tailoring.

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27 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 MEN ARE BREAKING SOCIAL NORMS In a village of Muzaffarnagar district Uttar Pradesh education for girls is not considered a priority. Most girls drop out of school after completing primary education and remain confined within the boundaries of their homes. Prem 22 the eldest among three brothers and a sister met with Oxfam India’s partner organization Astitva and became part of a youth group to mobilize other young adolescents in the village. Soon he became an active member of the youth group and attended the sessions regularly. These sessions helped him to discard his regressive perceptions about gender stereotypes. After his mother’s death his sister was burdened with all the household chores that led her to discontinue her education. During one of the discussions he realized that while he was mobilizing other young people to promote positive norms these ideals were not followed at his home. This realization was a turning point in his life and thus began his journey of transformation. He knew that change starts from home and so he started helping his sister in household chores and received retaliation from his father. But he was firm and tried to convince his family that every girl including his sister have the same right to education as any boy. He also motivated his brothers to help their sister and break social norms. He encouraged his sister to continue her education and helped in her studies. He now narrates his story of change to motivate other group members. Seeing his enthusiasm and zeal he was made the youth group leader in the village. “Such training sessions have helped me change my attitude towards women. Today I want my sister to complete her education and hope that girl’s education becomes a top priority in every village” says Prem. Name changed to protect identity. CHANGE STORY

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30 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 GOAL By 2020 fewer women men and children will die or sufer from injustice and deprivation from increasingly frequent natural disasters and confict. At risk communities realise their rights to have clean water food sanitation and other fundamental needs. The communities will be free from violence during a crisis and take control of their own lives in dignity Approximately 101544 persons were supported during India floods. 750 existing water sources including hand pumps and open wells and supply water points were tested and repaired. We have reached to 94603 men women and children for public health promotion activities. 16924 families were supported with NFI Shelter and livelihood opportunities. KEY HIGHLIGHTS HUMANITARIAN AND DRR

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31 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 HUMANITARIAN AND DRR 5 4 13 12 155 19347 25090 102723 143000 5 4 13 12 155 19347 25090 102723 143000 HUMANITARIAN STATES STATES DISTRICTS DISTRICTS HOUSEHOLDS HOUSEHOLDS VILLAGES PEOPLE PEOPLE DISASTER RISK REDUCTION DRR Oxfam India’s humanitarian and DRR strategy is built following a thread that runs from maintaining Oxfam India’s quality programming at scale to enhancing its monitoring evaluation and learning translating this to communication of findings and through which building an Oxfam India humanitarian and DRR profile that is defined by good practice. Oxfam will leverage this profile not only to influence national and state policy and mechanisms but also to attract and secure donor sources. The realisation of the ambition outlined in this Strategy is dependent on the conversion of Oxfam’s good practice at program level into communicable and compelling cases for donors and government departments alike.

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32 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 Relief Phase: Cyclone Mora that made a landfall in May 2017 in Bangladesh led to heavy torrential rains in the northeastern states of India which resulted in rising water levels of various rives in Brahmaputra and Barack valley leading to severe flooding particularly in Assam. The state faced the worst flood in the last 29 years. From June till October there were 4 phases of flooding in the different parts of the states which affected 31/33 districts in Assam. Within the affected communities women children the elderly persons with disabilities and/or who are socially excluded were the most vulnerable as they had limited contingency resources to draw on for support. Strategic use of ICT to improve the effectiveness of humanitarian work including data collection registration of beneficiaries conducting Post Distribution Monitoring PDM surveys and integrating enhanced mechanism of Monitoring Evaluation Accountability and Learning MEAL the innovative ICT based application was used. This helped in ensuring effective timely and impactful implementation of the programme. The innovative platform solution employed location based technologies GPS map enabled systems web-GIS open source satellite imageries Google earth through internet and smart phone/tablet based applications. The ICT led solution enabled the humanitarian workers to capture and share the location-based data on real time basis in various formats required for effective planning and implementation. - It improved the effectiveness of Monitoring Evaluation Accountability and Learning MEAL in the project. - The application captured the progress of different components of Disaster Response projects at different ASSAM HUMANITARIAN RESPONSE Use of innovative ‘Oxfam India ICT Mobile App+WebGIS Application for Humanitarian and Emergency Response Operations’ phases and gives a ready- to monitor format for providing supportive supervision. - The project- wise dashboard provided instant idea about the progress of the project on real time basis. - It generates reports in a very easy manner beneficiary report Spatial reports based on geographical location or date Muster Roll report with photographs and fingerprints of beneficiaries summary reports etc.. - The use of ICT solution ensured the inclusion of Women single pregnant lactating mothers adolescent girls and people from differently able groups in beneficiary list and increased their access to and control of resources provided through Unconditional Cash Transfer UCT interventions Oxfam humanitarian team reached the location within 24 hours of the onset of the emergency and responded in the most affected 4 districts of Karimganj Lakhimpur Dhubri and South Salmara with emergency shelter and hygiene NFI. Oxfam provided support to the most affected communities specially focussing on women pregnant and lactating women elderly disabled household who have lost their house or crop during the flood etc. 1. Assisted 8200 households with shelter NFI to protect themselves from extreme weather condition. 2. Assisted 8200 households with hygiene and wash items to reduce the burden of any health risks. 3. Repaired and chlorinated 538 water sources to ensure availability of safe potable drinking water. 4. 300 most affected households were provided with unconditional cash transfer to ensure that they are able to cope up with the negative impact of the flood and have food security and alternative livelihood options. 5. Constructed 123 sanitation facilities including gender segregated toilets community toilets and temporary toilets to ensure access to improved sanitation facilities. 6. 68 water sources were installed that includes raised hand pumps dug wells to ensure availability of water sources in the community.

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33 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 Emergency Food Security and Vulnerable Livelihood EFSVL: • Oxfam provided Cash for Work CFW to 400 most vulnerable families who have lost their livelihood or are in need for financial support to restore livelihood and meet the household expenses. More than 50 of the beneficiaries were women in the CFW initiative. • Oxfam provided kitchen garden support to 210 beneficiaries to ensure food security through backyard and flood resilient farming. The beneficiaries were provided with seed and gardening equipment along with training from the Krishi Vigyan Kendra. KVK • 100 beneficiaries were provided with commonly used tool for fishing and agriculture to boost their source of income. • Water Sanitation and Hygiene WaSH • Installation of toilets – Oxfam has set of individual toilets for the most vulnerable beneficiaries in the 5 gram panchayats to ensure their access to safe sanitation facilities. • Installation of raised hand pumps: During the floods most of the hand pumps get damaged due to contamination and inundation Oxfam has installed flood resilient hand pumps to ensure that the hand pumps are functional even during floods. • Public Health Promotion Activities: Oxfam initiated promotion activities in various schools of the 5 gram panchayats to promote awareness of WASH in the communities as well as in school. A specially designed programme on voucher intervention has been initiated with adolescent girls to ensure awareness on menstrual hygiene through promotion of sanitary products. MANIPUR Oxfam’s Response: Oxfam’s Response | Early Recovery Phase Oxfam initiated its early recovery in 16 villages of Karimganj districts with a focus on “Build Back Bet- ter”. The focus is on creating community assets and the capacities of the communities to be prepared for future foods or disasters. After incessant rainfall in the entire north eastern states of India Manipur faced massive floods forcing communities to move out of their house. Many families had to take shelter on embankment school buildings roads etc. The government of Manipur declared the Manipur floods as a state calamity. Oxfam reached out to the vulnerable communities immediately after the flood and with the support of 2 partners Integrated Rural Management Association and Participatory Rural Development Agency PRDA in 3 most affected districts East Imphal Bishnupur and Thoubal. The relief phase started in June and was extended till November 2017. During this phase Oxfam distributed emergency shelter kit which included – Tarpaulin ground sheet bed sheet water filter mosquito net and solar lights. The hygiene kit included the specially designed buckets mug antiseptic lotion bathing and washing soap sanitary clothes etc. Shelter and Hygiene NFI distribution : 6200 flood affected households in Bishnupur Thoubal and Imphal East districts have access to emergency shelter materials and non-food items providing them safety and protection from elements of weather Wash update 1. Village Cleaning Drive: As a part of solid waste management village cleaning drives were conducted in the programme villages. The local people from the flood- affected communities were encouraged to clean their surrounding areas in villages. Potential mosquito breeding sites were flushed water logged areas were cleaned. All these efforts taken in collaboration with the community members helped in making the village environment clean and healthy. Streets drainages and water logged areas are cleaned during village cleaning drive. 2. Menstrual Hygiene Awareness Pad-making training: Training was organised on menstrual hygiene management in which women were trained on how to maintain menstrual hygiene before and during menstruation. 3. PHP activity with children: Various activities were held with children on the topics of competition were: a. Solid Waste Management and b. Sanitation and Hygiene. Students also presented a drama and a song on these subjects.

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34 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 4. Installation of Raised Community Latrine: 4 raised community latrines with 3 unit blocks have been installed in 3 villages of Bishnupur district. These toilets would ensure access to safe sanitation to 246 HHs / 1163 persons. It was observed that almost all the households in Manipur have access to safe sanitation supported by the Government’s Swacch Bharat Abhiyaan. 5. Rehabilitation of existing water sources: 10 existing water sources have been rehabilitated to ensure access to safe water to communities in Bishnupur and Thoubal district. Emergency Food Security and Vulnerable Livelihood 200 of the most vulnerable flood affected households have improved ability to address their food and health related needs through income-generating opportunities limiting the use of negative coping strategies through unconditional cash transfer assistance. Each beneficiary was assisted with INR 8000 one time support of cash INR 200 X 40 days INR 8000. TWEET TO TRANSFORM Oxfam India partnered with Twitter India for the Tweet to Transform 2017 event in Guwahati. The objective of the workshop was to share the stories from the ground to the larger community. Learn the lessons on Assam Flood on using social media during disaster. The workshop was attended by eminent media personnel from across the country civil society members and Government functionaries from Assam. Oxfam is responding in 10 villages of Bishnupur district in its early recovery initiative. During this phase Oxfam will be working towards building resilience of the communities for future floods and disaster. Oxfam will be primarily focusing on rebuilding lives through livelihood initiatives like kitchen garden distribution of livestock and demonstration of some innovative practices. Along with this Oxfam will also work towards building flood resilient WASH facilities in the communities to ensure availability of uninterrupted water and sanitation facilities during flood. Oxfam’s Response | Early Recovery Phase Oxfam’s Response | Early Recovery Phase BIHAR Heavy rainfall in the neighbouring country Nepal led to overflowing of many rivers in Bihar which finally resulted into a devastating flood. 23 districts in the Terai belt struggled for almost three months. This is the subsequent year when Bihar faced devastating floods. More than 17 million people huge amount of crop land and livestock suffered during the floods. Communities specially the poor and marginalised had to live on the embankments/ railway platforms and relief camps for many months before returning to their homes. Oxfam’s Response: Oxfam responded in two most affected districts – Katihar and Sitamarhi with shelter WASH and EFSVL interventions with the objective to contribute towards prevention of mortality and morbidity of floods affected Household HH of Katihar districts of Bihar by ensuring increased access to safe water and hygiene and emergency shelter materials. - Assist 2253 families to protect themselves from weather related stresses through emergency shelter materials including tarpaulins groundsheet bed sheets blankets solar lamps and mosquito nets - Assist 2253 families to have access to Hygiene items to reduce their risk to public health diseases with the help of buckets mugs washing and bathing soaps oral rehydration solution and antiseptic liquid. - Chlorinate/Repair 308 hand pumps/ water points ensuring access to safe drinking water to approximately 10599 persons in worst affected village. - Reach out to around 14413 across 16 worst affected villages in Katihar district through Public Health Promotion Activities for improving community hygiene and sanitation practices. - 138 most affected households were provided with unconditional cash transfer to ensure - As part of the early recovery intervention Oxfam has distributed a pair of goat to 100 families and sewing machines to 50 women with the objective to restore the livelihood with an alternative source of income. This will help them to recover from their losses during the flood and also help them with a sustainable income.

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35 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 GUJARAT - Oxfam also experimented with community and women oriented toilet blocks in the community to ensure access and availability of toilet facilities for both women and men in the community. - Oxfam also constructed tiger worm toilets which are low cost sustainable models of toilets constructed at the household level. The main component of these toilets are the tiger worms which breaks down the faecal matter into bio digester. Incessant heavy rainfall in Uttar Pradesh and in neighbouring country Nepal led to the flooding in 26 districts of 75 in Uttar Pradesh. Heavy rainfall led to rise in water levels in River Ganga Ghagra Betwa and Sharda. It caused breach of embankments and the water quickly reached into the villages destroying shelter crop livestock and other properties. The distributions of Hygiene Kits comprising chlorine tablets and buckets with mugs helped to address the urgent need for safe drinking water. Oral Rehydration Salts assured that each of the supported households had fluid substitutes for family members suffering from commonly occurring emergency-time illnesses such as diarrhea. Bathing soaps laundry soaps detergents and sanitary products for women assisted affected communities to maintain personal hygiene - critical during emergencies in reducing the risks of waterborne diseases. Oxfam also worked extensively to repair and chlorinate water sources in the villages. Raised hand pumps were installed in schools villages and tollas where no other sources of water were available. Public health promotion along with awareness generation on menstrual hygiene was extensively taken up. Oxfam assisted 1750 families with Shelter and Hygiene NFI to ensure that communities are able cope up with the extreme condition and reduce the risk of any public health hazard. The PHE and PHP teams tireless worked towards ensuring improved access to safe drinking water and sanitation facilities along with hygiene promotion. More than 108 water sources were chlorinated 6 water points were rehabilitated and 2 WASH trainings were organised. The devastating flood in Gujarat was the result of a low pressure developed over north-west Madhya Pradesh which moved towards Gujarat along with the deep depression formed over the Arabian Sea which brought heavy rains. The torrential rainfall since 21th July 2017 to 28th July’17 in Gujarat and due to the overflowing of Shipur and Banas river in lower catchment of Rajasthan led to flooding in 13 districts of Gujarat. Based on Oxfam’s humanitarian team’s Rapid needs Assessment in the worst affected districts the critical areas for urgent humanitarian assistance included essential emergency shelter water sanitation hygiene Wash non-food items NFI such as tarpaulins groundsheets containers/ buckets for safe drinking water and menstrual hygiene along with emergency food security and vulnerable livelihoodsEFSVL. Emergency Shelter Kits: 1000 families were supported with emergency shelter kit comprising of tarpaulin and groundsheets. Tarpaulin was extremely useful as the families used them on the damaged roof to protect them from the extreme weather condition. The groundsheets were placed on the floor as the earthen floor is completely washed away. Many of them are also using them as a screen to create a private space for women. Chlorine tablets: Each of the hygiene Kits distributed had 60 chlorine tablets enough to provide immediate access to safe drinking water for 30 days. Chlorine tablets reduce the chances of any water born diseases due to the contamination of water. Delivery of safe water through tankers: Oxfam initiated delivering water in the area through tankers to 3000 Household so that communities have access to safe water for drinking and cooking. Public Health Promotion: Oxfam’s objective was to assist communities improve and practice safe hygiene practices. We focus on reduction in the risk of transmission of Wash related diseases through improved access to WaSH support and promote the rights dignity safety and protection of all disaster-affected people.

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36 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 HIGHLIGHTS DRR Total 4590 adolescent girls were sensitized on use of sanitary cloths and napkins disposal system bathing and proper hand washing. We have reached to around 1.86 lakhs of men and women for our DRR initiatives in terms of building their resilience training on safety and rescue operations Wash Livelihood. School Disaster Management Plans were updated and school DRR committees were re- constituted in 85 schools. Community-based early warning systems were strengthened in 175 villages of our intervention areas. 1400 small and marginal farmers were supported with stress-tolerant seeds for livelihood support during floods. KEY INITIATIVES TO STRENGTHEN DRR WORK Impact Study of Oxfam DRR work in Uttar Pradesh and Assam. The overall purpose of the study was to assess how the presence of a DRR programme in the target areas in the focus states have contributed to reduce the humanitarian needs help communities to better prepare respond and cope with the disaster through evidences and good examples of how DRR can really make the difference. The final report is expected to be ready by end of this week. Oxfam DRR work has been considered for an Effectiveness Review through OGB’s open call this year. The study is being conducted in Assam Bihar and Odisha with the objective to review the impact of the DRR intervention in the targeted district vis a vis in comparison villages. All of Oxfam’s work is influenced by the belief that poverty and suffering are not inevitable features of our world. Poverty makes people and especially women more vulnerable both to disasters and conflict. Oxfam believes that poverty-induced vulnerability represents an unacceptable level of injustice and inequality and that integrated thorough and accountable Disaster Risk Reduction DRR is key to addressing this imbalance and offering sustainable futures free from poverty. In order to achieve lasting change and to contribute to the alleviation of poverty and suffering our DRR approach ensures that our development humanitarian and advocacy work incorporates an analysis of disaster risk and seeks to reduce it. We believe that where development humanitarian and advocacy action integrates an understanding of disaster risk it is more likely to enhance peoples’ resilience to disasters raising their voice and enabling them to protect their lives and livelihoods. Our Disaster Risk Reduction programme over the years aims to avoid lessen or transfer the adverse effects of hazards through activities and measures for prevention mitigation and preparedness. Oxfam India is implementing the DRR project in four disaster-prone states of Assam Uttar Pradesh Bihar and Odisha. KEY HIGHLIGHTS IN FOCUS STATES Uttar Pradesh - There are 35 village disaster management committees VDMC formed previous year out of which 15 VDMCs were re constituted. - 35 village disaster management plans VDMPs were formed and shared with gram panchayat. Out of this 3 VDMPs were approved by gram sabha and some resources were allocated under swatch Bharati mission schemes. - PVCA was conducted in 35 villages of Gorakhpur Siddharthnagar and Maharajganj. There were 442 members including 233 female and 209 male members in PVCA exercise. - 28 mock drills were conducted with participation of 1429 members including 263 male 701 female members and 365 children. Issues of first-aid early warning dissemination search rescue WASH and shelter management etc was covered. - 189 hand pumps were chlorinated by WASH committee members in the project villages. 109 WASH committee members have developed their understanding on safe drinking water storage chlorination and safe usage of drinking water.

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37 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 - In the project villages 35 women lead WASH groups are operational. More than 70 of members in WASH committees are women members. - During reporting period 109 members were trained on health and hygiene before and during emergency. 327 hand pumps were chlorinated by WASH committee members. - In Gorakhpur a district level disaster preparedness meeting was organized with 39 members including 32 males and 7 female members. During the meeting members shared their contingency materials and discussed about preparedness of the village during emergency. - Refresher training for Para vets trained personals on cattle vaccination was organized in for 19 para vets on nutrition of different cattle and treatment of food and mouth disease pre and post monsoon vaccination. In 15 villages 545 animals were vaccinated before monsoon which prevented them from suffering from any kind of diseases. - Interface meeting between VDMC and PRI other stakeholders including revenue department health women and child development PDS and agriculture department. - Formation of Citizen Forum in Sohratgarh was formed with 23 members from PRI and key influential leaders Assam - Village level community action plans updated in all 45 programme villages out of which 10 Community Action Plans shared in GP plans. In all target villages Asha and ANM along with People with Disabilities included in task force committees - VDMCs and WASH committees took the initiative to chlorinate 50 water sources providing access to safe water to 370 persons in the target villages and one school in Darrang District. Refresher training of WASH committee members on chlorination of water sources conducted. After the floods decontamination of affected water sources was done to prevent outbreak of water borne diseases. - 387 members including 168 women attended training on hand pump repairing and chlorination of water sources held across all four partners for capacity building of WASH committees VDMC members. As a result trained resources are available in the villages for fixing minor problems of water sources. - 48 male farmers from three villages in Jorhat attended trainings on vermi-compost animal husbandry vegetable cultivation conducted by Krishi Vigyan Kendra KVK. Besides they were also able to enhance their knowledge on flood tolerant agriculture practices. - VDMCs from target villages in Jorhat were able to mobilize Livestock vaccination support personnel and medicine support and livestock management from Department of Veterinary and Animal Husbandry - In Darrang district one of the Community Action Plan CAP submitted by VDMC of one of our target village for incorporation in the GP plan was approved Gram Panchayat contributed land and allotted Rs. 6 40000 for constructing raised platforms which will be utilized for protecting livestock assets. Bihar - Wash Committee had been formed in all 45 villages and caterings WASH need of the people in villages and these committee is being quite useful in the time of flood for arranging chlorination of water sources bleaching powder lime powder for affected areas these committees also ensure Hand washing practise for children. - Training Programmes on various government social security schemes was conducted for the Community. The VDMC in all 30 project villages in consultation and involvement of the other key members of the community updated the Village Disaster Management Plans. Village based mock drills were conducted in 30 project villages to test various components of the disaster management plan including early warning search rescue first aid wash and relief management. - During the reporting period four Block Level Disaster Management Committee have been formed. These committees comprise of key members of VDMCs and panchayat who acts as a pressure group for effective implementation of various development activities in the villages. - Prepositioning of materials like bleaching powder

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38 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 ropes hammer torch etc. was of great use as these materials were very handy during times of flooding. - In all the 45 villages pre monsoon vaccination of cattle was conducted as a result no cases of cattle death was reported. Odisha - Village Disaster Management Plans were updated in all 30 project villages. Plans were approved in the Pallisabha meetings - Oxfam and its partners collaborated with fire department and health department to train 142 taskforce team members from Balasore Jajpur and Puri in early warning dissemination search and rescue first aid and Relief Management. - Village based mock drills were conducted in 30 project villages to test various components of the disaster management plan including early warning search rescue first aid wash and relief management. Officials from local fire department participated in these mock drills as technical experts - 2112 trained volunteers were established in the 03 River Basins including Subarnarekha Mahanadi in Puri and Brahmani – Birupa in Jajpur to strengthen the community based early warning system in the last mile network of local NGOs. These volunteers have an extended outreach in 163 flood prone villages from 52 Gram Panchayats and 05 blocks in the 03 project districts. - A software “Volunteer Network Management System” is developed to improve access to critical information to flood prone communities in a real time. - 30 WASH committees were formed and were involved in preparation of WASH plans for their respective villages. The wash plans were shared in the special gram sabha meeting organised on 15th Aug 2017. - 130 village based volunteers were trained in water source chlorination minor repairs of drinking water sources in emergencies and safe water storage and handling in 03 separate trainings in Jodapadar in Puri Tambakhuri in Balasore and in Bhanara Gram Panchayat office in Jajpur. - Water samples from 250 drinking water sources were sent to Government labs for water testing. 426 water sources were chlorinated to minimise bacterial contamination. Oxfam’s successful pilot implementation of decentralised water filtration units operated by renewable energy sources helped it to raise additional funds of Rs 3766000/- to replicate the model in all project villages - Public Health Promotion in 10 schools included sessions with students and teachers on hand washing at critical times personal hygiene and sanitation safe water handling and storage and filtration techniques at household level during emergencies - 1086 adolescent girls and women were trained on safe menstrual hygiene management during emergencies. The emphasis was not only on the use of sanitary napkins in emergency in safe and dignified environment but also on ensuring availability of affordable sanitary pads at local levels in emergencies. TRANS BOUNDARY RIVERS OF SOUTH ASIA FOCUSING ON WATER GOVERNANCE: The goal of the TROSA program is to address this - reducing poverty and marginalisation of vulnerable river basin communities through increased access to and control over riverine water resources on which their livelihoods depend. Through this program water governance policies and practice will be implemented with trans-boundary and gender inclusive commitments there will be political will in governments and private sector to meaningfully engage river communities in water governance and when civil society especially women and minorities will have achieved their basic rights influencing trans- boundary water policy and processes of governance. Communities and civil society will be more informed and involved in opportunities for trans-boundary water dialogues and decision-making and there will be greater consideration of women’s views as a result of their rights being respected. The program is designed in such a way that throughout the entire program lifespan deliberate efforts are made to provide opportunities for joint learning both in-country and between the four countries and enrich the documentation process organized through joint learning events. Lessons learnt will be used to improve program implementation contribute to broader learning and serve as a basis for advocacy both within Oxfam and in the wider humanitarian and development sectors.

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39 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 The program will also seek to add to and build on experiences and lessons learnt from existing programs such as the Mekong/Inclusion program IUCN’s E4L and BRIDGE programs DFAT’s Sustainable Development Investment Strategy ICIMOD’s River Basins Program and the World Bank South Asia Water Initiative. Formation of VDMCs: VDMCs were formed in Assam and Uttar Pradesh with the aims to organize them into an institution strengthened them through various training and they go on to raise their voice concerning the problem. PVCAs were conducted in Assam and Uttar Pradesh with the communities facilitated by the partner organization. Based on the PVCAs Community Action Plans were also prepared. Interface meeting with Government- In Uttar Pradesh 2 interface meetings were held with community members PRI members and media person to share an understanding on the water governance role of VDMCs in DRR and issues of river basin. Along with this a block level meeting with block Functionaries was also organized. In Assam an interface was organized with Assam Brahmaputra Valley Flood Control Board. Oxfam participated in the 3rd World Congress on Disaster Management in Vishakhapatnam Andhra Pradesh. The workshop focused on need and urgency for Disaster Risk Reduction DRR infrastructure as increased frequency and intensity of floods and droughts are posing a serious threat to water security. Oxfam also participated in a workshop by Aaranyak in collaboration with the Environment and Population Research Centre EPRC Dhaka organized “Regional Consultation on Cooperation in DRR and CCA in the Brahmaputra River Basin” at Guwahati. It was supported by “The Asia Foundation” New Delhi. Partners and TROSA team participated in a workshop organized by International Rivers hosted the Influencing Change in the Private Sector- Building on Good Practice Experience meeting at Bangkok Thailand. This workshop was designed as a sharing and learning forum to explore approaches to engaging private sector operators towards change in practice and policy especially looking at efforts to influence private sectors whose business exploits the natural resources

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40 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 HUMANITARIAN RELIEF EFFORTS - NORTH EAST Preeti Naobi 25 had witness the flood wash her home and everything with it. Her husband and children had to move to a higher land to save themselves. Naobi along with her family and other villagers took shelter in the relief camp near their village in Manipur. Floods in the North East affected lakhs of lives in 2017. With no hygiene and sanitation facilities people struggled to survive and were at a great risk of water-borne diseases due to the stagnant flood water and consumption of flood water was their only source. Naobi’s family too struggled survive and meet ends. Lack of sanitation facilities affected her children’s health and they developed skin infections cough cold and fever. 80 of the village was submerged in water and people remained jobless and homeless. Many took refuge in community halls where women and children had no room for privacy. Oxfam India with it partner organization responded to the crisis after holding a proper assessment of the immediate and emergency needs of the community. Oxfam India provided emergency shelter support and hygiene kit to the entire village as also constructed two raised latrine block for the communities to ensure safe sanitation. The most affected families also received unconditional cash support to start an alternate livelihood and meet basic food security. “Our source of livelihood is fishing and the money we received from Oxfam helped us repair our boat and its net. The kits and construction of toilets helped us survive the floods. Now we will work hard to rebuild our lives and send our children to school” said Naobi. Name changed to protect identity. CHANGE STORY

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41 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 DISASTER RISK REDUCTION DRR OXFAM INDIA BUILDS WATER SOLUTION IN DISASTER PRONE AREAS In India over one lakh people die of water-borne diseases annually. Our country faces a huge challenge in ensuring safe water supply especially during floods. Lakhs of people last year were forced to use contaminated water for drinking or sanitation during floods causing health problems. In Odisha more than 90 of the rural population depends on groundwater for drinking and domestic purposes and the groundwater is mainly contaminated with iron fluoride chloride and salinity in coastal districts. Due to this most of the hand pumps in the rural areas became non-operational during floods and clean drinking water became unavailable for a very long period of time. During this time communities are forced to access water from ponds and river which has bacterial contamination. Oxfam India has implemented the Disaster Risk Reduction programme in flood-prone districts in Odisha. The programme focusses on building local capacities to anticipate and prepare for natural disasters and improve the water sanitation and hygiene conditions before during and after emergencies. The focus was to build low cost water filtration and sanitation models to make flood resilient communities. 10 iron removal plants powered by solar energy were installed in 10 villages to ensure availability of potable water during disasters. The initiative has ensured continuous access to safe drinking water for at least 817 households and more than 4500 people in 10 villages. In all the villages the Village Disaster Management Committee VDMC and Water Sanitation and Hygiene WASH committees played a major role by participating in the planning and maintenance of the water sources. In some areas the communities provided labour cost and some material cost as well. In order to ensure the sustainability of the process Oxfam India built capacities of local institutions and village-based committees. The objective was to ensure that the communities are self-dependent in managing their water resources without external help or with minimal external help during emergencies. By the end of this project VDMC and WASH committees will have the skills and knowledge to construct community-based water filtration units disinfect and maintain drinking water sources and use appropriate methods of water storage and handling. Secondly Oxfam India also ensured that only locally available resources are being used for the construction of filtration units. This way the local communities will have access to the required material and resources for any construction after the implementing agencies have exited. At Oxfam India we promote low-cost technologies which can be easily replicated through nominal community contribution at the village level. Last year Oxfam India helped over one lakh people recover during and after disasters in India. CHANGE STORY

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44 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 The private sector engagement PSE programme advocates for transparency in private sector policies. It also intends to create platforms where CSOs can represent the marginalised communities and make their voices heard. The genesis of Private sector engagement comes from the the Oxfam India’s Theory of Change and its first change goal that refers to the people’s right to be heard. This year we observed some imporstant actions in the space of business responsibility. These changes were more significant at the regulatory and investor side rather than on the side of companies. On the regulatory side the Securities Exchange Board of India SEBI acknowledged the importance of environment sustainability and governance ESG for listed companies and recommended more discussion on ESG by the board of directors every year . Both the national stock exchanges launched dedicated indices based on ESG factors. Bombay Stock Exchange launched the SP BSE 100 ESG Index while National Stock Exchange launched two ESG based indices – NIFTY100 ESG Index and NIFTY100 Enhanced ESG Index . The third edition of India Responsible Business Index was released in February 2018. This index analyses business responsibility disclosure of the top 100 companies’ listed on BSE. A three years’ comparison of index shows an improvement in overall scores in the elements of community development employee dignity human rights and non-discrimination. On the other hand there has been very little improvement on the issue of inclusiveness in supply chain. There has been no improvement at all on the issue of community as business stakeholders. IRBF KEY FINDINGS The disclosure analysis of the top 100 companies cohort across the three years shows an improvement in overall scores in the elements of community development employee dignity human rights and non-discrimination. On the element of community development 80 companies scored between 50 - 100 in 2017 as compared to 43 companies in 2017 86 On the element of employee dignity and human rights 36 companies scored between 50 - 100 in 2017 as compared to 24 in 2015 50 On the element of non-discrimination 58 companies scored between 50 - 100 as compared to 53 in 2015 On the element of supply chain 18 companies scored between 50 - 100 as compared to 14 in 2017 28 No change was recorded on the element of community as business stakeholders. In a research conducted by Oxfam India and cKinetics on Sustainable and Responsible Investments SRI it was highlighted that a large number of asset managers expressed the need for better disclosure data from Indian companies. The SRI report titled ‘Drops before the Rain – Sustainable and Responsible Investing Landscape 2017’ was launched at the National Stock Exchange highlighted the key trends related to SRI in India. One of India’s largest mutual fund house SBI Mutual Fund changed one of its existing mutual fund scheme to an ESG based scheme . Kotak Mutual Fund another major mutual fund company became the first Indian asset management company to become a signatory of UN Principles for Responsible Investment. These are important signals suggesting PRIVATE SECTOR ENGAGEMENT

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45 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 15 CSO 6 PS 3 independent and 1 academia members led discussions at IRBF 2018 32 participants attended the SRI roundtable – 18 PS 8 CSOs 4 Industry Networks and 2 stock exchange 97 people participated in the IRBF event with 50 PS 32 CSO 8 academia 2 Govt 3 media 1 trade union and 1 embassy A roundtable titled ‘Gender lens to international investment and finance sector’ was co- organised at Ashoka University which was attended by over 30 CSO representatives HIGHLIGHTS Joint advocacy with IRBF India Responsible Business Forum that the concepts of responsible business conduct are moving towards the mainstream. Oxfam India continues to build the dialogue on SRI in India through roundtable discussions and webinars. Within sustainable and responsible investing the role of banks is also very significant. Banks are responsible to ensure that they conduct proper due diligence of their investee companies to avoid financing any violations of human rights. Indian banks have so far refrained from acknowledging this responsibility as reflected in the low scores of financial institutions on the IRBI supply chain element. Oxfam India published a paper titled’ Banking on Gender Equality’ to analyse of the review of banking sector conducted with a gender lens was done to highlight the imperative of women’s advancement as a critical element in sustainable finance. OXFAM INDIA’S RECOGNITION IN PRIVATE SECTOR ENGAGEMENT The number of media citations remained similar to last year with 17 media articles and/ or coverage on the index and SRI report. The coverage included 5 long-form articles a 9 minute coverage in India’s top business news channel CNBC in its prime-time show and other organic citations - OIN was invited to speak at events organized by UN Global Compact Global Reporting Initiative World Business Council on Sustainable Development and Ashoka University. OIN conducted a half-day session on SDGs and Business and Human Rights for a batch of 75 students at Indian Law Institute for a certificate course offered by ILI and HURBA. Also conducted a case study workshop for practicing corporate lawyers at an event organized by A4ID. OIN was invited to speak at the UN Forum on Business and Human Rights in Geneva. - Social media engagement increased significantly this year with 242 followers on Twitter increase of 44 since last year 103 followers on Linkedin increase of 38 and 211 followers on Facebook an increase of nearly 50 REACH AND VISIBILITY OF IRBF • 3827 unique users between Apr 2017 – Mar 2018 visited the IRBF website an increase of 278 as compared to previous year • 400 copies of the index analysis report was shared with companies CSOs regulators and academia • The IRBF data portal was accessed by 881 unique users which is an increase of 103 since last year • 171 unique users visited the sustainable and responsible investing webpage on IRBF website • 30 users downloaded the SRI report 53 researchers 23 asset managers 20 CSOs • 300 printed copies of the report was shared with companies asset managers regulators and academia.

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46 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 INDIA AND THE WORLD Over the course of 2017-18 India and the World IATW continued to expand the quality and quantity of the niche work it undertakes on linking Indian foreign policy imperatives to development finance. The programme’s remit includes assessing India’s foreign aid programme from an accountability and transparency lens as well as the country’s role in multilateral platforms such as the BRICS and G20 in articulating issues of pressing concern to the global South including the alleviation of poverty and the mitigation of inequalities in income opportunity and gender. In 2017-18 IATW augmented its body of research on India’s foreign aid programme usually subsumed within the development cooperation and/or South South Cooperation paradigm. Having completed research studies on Indian development cooperation with Bhutan 2015-16 and Bangladesh 2016-17 as well as tracing the history of the country’s development cooperation modalities activities and emerging trends 2015-16 IATW expanded the breadth of its research partnerships this year for sectoral studies on Indian aid to Nepal and Sri Lanka. It established a new partnership with the Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations ICRIER among the country’s leading think tanks to undertake an analysis of Indian development cooperation flows to Nepal’s education and road infrastructure sectors. IATW also undertook a mapping exercise with ICRIER to evaluate the contours of Indian overseas foreign direct investment OFDI with a particular focus on sub-Saharan Africa. This research exercise was backed by Oxfam Hong Kong and was completed in early March 2018 with the expectation that OFDI being an increasingly important development cooperation instrument that remains little understood within civil society will become a subject area for IATW to explore more closely over the short term. It is noteworthy that this challenging area of work has seen little or no engagement by civil society before the effort of Oxfam India through IATW. After three years of engaging with this piece of work through original research the programme has gained some ground in the pursuit its goal of creating a civil society space within India’s bureaucratic circles particularly the Ministry of External Affairs to deliberate on issues of foreign policy and overseas economic cooperation to help make such pivotal processes more accountable to the Indian public. IATW’s greatest success in 2017-18 was its engagement with the New Development Bank NDB. Tasked with leading engagements with the NDB for Oxfam’s BRICS affiliates IATW engaged with a network of civil society organisations through the Coalition for Human Rights in Development to influence the Bank’s operational policies and strategy. Through concerted efforts with the Bank’s senior management IATW helped coordinate multiple meetings to debate Bank policies with NDB Vice Presidents during the Bank’s Annual General Meeting held in April 2017.

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47 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 The landmark achievement was undoubtedly the two-day meeting coordinated by IATW with support from Oxfam Hong Kong between 26 BRICS civil society representatives and the multiple tiers of NDB staff including its President Vice Presidents senior management and mid-tier operations and finance teams. For IATW this was a crucial platform to also disseminate the findings of its holistic research studies undertaken on six different policy themes across six regional and multilateral development finance institutions Vasudha Foundation September 2017 and on the NDB’s Information Disclosure Policy. OIN’s efforts were acknowledged and lauded by the NDB which committed to the civil society interface becoming an annual event a first step in having the Bank create a space to engage with public representatives.

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48 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 FUNDRAISING AND PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT We have been investing in the last 3 years to build the launch pad and back end systems to supports a multi-channel strategy. Earlier Oxfam India only had one Face to Face channel and was focussed only on single giving. We have been able to an orbit changing shift and our focus on this has made Oxfam India build a regular giving portfolio. A lot of energy has done in building our platform and system and processes that enable regular giving. This is complex in Indian context due to stringent banking regulations and especially with Development sector organizations. FUNDRAISING: THE COMPLETE PICTURE We have been investing in the last 3 years to build the launch pad and back end systems to supports a multi-channel strategy. Earlier Oxfam India only had one Face to Face channel and was focussed only on single giving. We have been able to an orbit changing shift and our focus on this has made Oxfam India build a regular giving portfolio. A lot of energy has done in building our platform and system and processes that enable regular giving. This is complex in Indian context due to stringent banking regulations and especially with Development sector organizations.

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49 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 We added a new channel for fund raising last year. We had set out on the digital fund raising journey last year. This required a lot of working on back end to ensure monthly deduction gateways are in place. We added payment aggregators in this year. This meant integration of their APIs on our website after due diligence conducted by banks and partners. We then moved to integrating debit card and successfully on-boarded ICIC Bank for this process. We have also integrated mobile wallet and are one of the first to have introduced this for monthly deduction. We also had live chat feature during emergency fund raising to ensure that all queries get answered and this also improved our conversion percentage. This process of making payment gateway live is effort and time consuming where the IT person has to do a System Integration and then there is a user acceptance test to see that the integration has been successful. To do this we beefed up hired an in-house resource to hasten us the process. This investment of time and effort for seamless deduction started giving us results and we have seen monthly giving donors have increased over the year with increased media spends. The new strategy talks about building synergies with our Campaign and program work. The approach is Public engagement. Oxfam India embarked on the journey of Public Engagement in 2017-2018 which necessitated a structural alignment within the functions of Communication and Fund raising. The two departments were merged to ensure better alignment and for one coherent public engagement vision of putting the ‘power of people and public’ into action and cultivating a globally-balanced and influential Oxfam movement in which supporters champion fund and drive us towards Oxfam’s vision. We continue to build an integrated and coherent public engagement vision. It necessitates a culture shift which requires joint initiatives of the Advocacy and Campaigning teams in collaboration with the Public Engagement function. Our media prowess in India was unleased this year during the Davos Inequality week and our TW participation too provide us a firm base for public engagement. We will be further strengthening this integrated approach in the year 2018-19 where we will be engaging a wider set of general public to build a huge supporter base. The Operational Plan for 2017-18 builds engaging a larger number of general public to become supporters for Oxfam India and inspire these supporters to take more actions to drive unrestricted incomes and to develop a stronger brand. This would mean that in partnership with Advocacy and Campaigns and Programs deliver stronger campaigning and influencing results by following a 360-degree approach. This will ultimately mean maximising our fundraising and raising Oxfam India’s profile as a lead player for humanitarian priorities through an integrated approach between Public Engagement Advocacy Campaigning and Programming PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT OXFAM TRAILWALKER In 2017-18 the Public Engagement team focused on ensuring more visibility for Oxfam India’s work in the media social media and digital space. Since its inception two years back the team also continued its efforts to build an integrated coherent public engagement narrative. Trailwalker is a global phenomenon and the ultimate team challenge. The participants form a team of four and walk 100km in 48 hours to make a big difference in someone’s life. The team must start the challenge together and must finish it together. It is mandatory for each team to raise a minimum amount before starting the event and those funds will be used by Oxfam India to reduce inequality. This year Oxfam India raised a close to Rs 3.70 crores from both the trailwalkers till 14 March 2018. BENGALURU

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50 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 HEALTH VIDEO ACTION A petition was launched for generating action around the global Oxfam campaign on tax dodging and tax havens. The video was released by Oxfam International a week before the ‘Panama Paper’s’ story broke out in the media. Oxfam India used the video to promote the petition and over 11000 people supported the call to action for the Indian government to stop StopTaxDodging and EndTaxHavens. The video has got 1.3 million views on Facebook so far and 54000 views on YouTube Figures as of March 31 2018. India Inequality Report and Davos Report/Action: Over 1000 media hits English and Hindi in 2017-18. This is excluding Television Figures and only includes Print and Digital. The quality has been very good with a lot of coverage on the full report mostly focused on Indian data and macro level global data on billionaires and wealth distribution. Multiple editorials in both English and Hindi focused on the issue of inequality while quoting Oxfam report. Overall the coverage has doubled compared to the last year in terms of number of hits as well as the quality. The top three mentions in the media based on the quality as well as reach are mentioned below. Media Digital Coverage: • Oxfam India CEO’s Oped was featured on the report in Indian Express. The newspaper is read by all policy makers and bureaucrats. It’s the official partner of ICIJ and released the Paradise Papers in India. • Oxfam India CEO’s Oped also featured when Paradise Papers came out 2. NDTV India Hindi: One of the top Indian TV Hindi News Journalist and Anchor Ravish Kumar covered the report in his prime time show on India’s most trusted news brand NDTV. 3. ABP News Hindi: Another top Hindi news channel did a primetime show on Oxfam’s report and asked people INEQUALITY CAMPAIGN The first Oxfam India Trailwalker was held in Bengaluru in February 2012. It has been followed by five more additions with an increase in participants every year. In 2017 It witnessed the introduction of the 50km walk for participants to complete in 24 hours. The Bengaluru Trailwalker was held from February 2-4 2018 with 339 teams walking the trail. A total of 244 teams participated in the 100 km walk and 95 teams participated in the 50 km walk. MUMBAI After the success of the Bengaluru Trailwalker in 2012 Oxfam Indiaintroduced the second Trailwalker in Mumbai in 2013. In 2014 a 50km walk was introduced in the Mumbai Trailwalker along with the 100km walk. Last year witnessed the fourth edition of the Mumbai Trailwalker from . The Mumbai Trailwalker was held from December 08- 10 2017 with 148 teams walking the trail. A total of 87 teams participated in the 100 km walk whereas 61 teams participated in the 50 km walk.

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51 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 to call to support the show. Over 36000 people gave a missed call during the show to show their support. NDP Videos and Action: To take forward the No Detention Policy NDP campaign three videos on No Detention Policy were made. The videos included footage and comments from experts like Prof. Batra ECCE Specialist Ambarish Rai RTE Activist and the story of Nitasha who was detained in school and it effects thereafter. Another influencer video featuring Dhruv Rathee was made where he explained the issue of NDP and urged people to support the campaign. The video had a call to action along with it – “Sign RTE Forum petition” which is ongoing. After this video was published the change.org petition signatures went up from 721 to 17224. The total video views are 160000 as of March 31 2018. BEST FILM FOR GENDER EQUALITY AWARD AT MAMI 2017 The MAMI award and engagement went very well in 2017- 18. With the social media reach of close to a million there was an additional engagement that was planned with the audience this time. The Bollywood brunch event had one of the survivors of domestic violence Oxfam beneficiary speaking to a set of influential celebrities about her experiences and journey. The media coverage The Quint DNA NDTV The Hindu Sakal Times Hindustan Times Mid- Day among others of the event was extensive with pre- event media and digital tie-ups Mid-Day sealed before the event. The Oxfam Best Film on Gender Equality Award this year went to Assemese language film ‘Village Rockstars’ directed by Rima Das. The film recently also won the National Award for the ‘Best Feature Film’ category. The engagement also gave the team access to more influencers to initiate conversations about Oxfam India and its work. Some of them in that list includes: Kangana Ranaut Manisha Koirala Kriti Sanon Sandhya Mridul Renuka Shahane Tisca Chopra. FForFreedom: FforFreedom is Oxfam India’s digital part of the larger BanoNayiSoch campaign on Gender Equality. It talks to the urban youth and our social media audience on BANO NAYI SOCH BNS gender norms that perpetrate violence against women. FforFreedom started in July 2017 as a feminist engagement that questions what ‘freedom’ means to women and for women. The engagement was launched with an OxLive Facebook Live with Rifat Jawaid Neeti Palta and Gurmehar Kaur on the topic ‘’Are we afraid of Women’s Freedom’. On 15th August 2017 we created an online film Rima Das accepting the ‘Oxfam Best Film On Gender Equality Award presented by Deepika Padukone

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52 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 The BNS Animation film was the winner of Best Animation Award at the Mumbai Shorts International Film Festival. It was also screened at Thessaloniki Animation Festival Greece 2017 as an official selection under ‘Human Rights Animated’ category animation films on human rights and diversity. The BNS Animation film also won TMFF - The Monthly Film Festival September ‘17 been selected as a finalist for Los Angeles CineFest for best Animation of the month ILLUSTRATE FOR IMPACT In sync with 16 days of Activism events Oxfam India reached out to young visual artists online by asking them to create a piece of illustration around behaviours and jargons of the women’s rights movement. We received a great response and with the intent that art activism is a fantastic tool of creating impact an exhibit showcasing 9 Indian artist was set up in Blue Tokai New Delhi and also displayed at the Radio Mirchi x Vidya Vox concert in New Delhi. that spoke of social norms in a new tone of voice to our online readership which was well received. We also did a short burst photo engagement with our female youth readership where we asked them to tell us what ‘labels’ society has given that because they are women who are claiming freedom. We had a positive and engaging response from SM influencers and Oxfam staff who participated in this feminist dialogue. From January 2018 to April 2018 FforFreedom featured in two big marathons Runex and AmityGGNMarathon in Delhi where we saw a collective footfall of over 20000. Oxfam India gained visibility on over 60 print ads materials in Delhi front page of TOI as well as massive social media outreach through these two engagements. ANIMATION FILM Animation film promoting gender equality part of the BNS campaign was released and is being disseminated on social media as well as Whatsapp.

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53 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 16-DAYS OF ACTIVISM EVENTS Radio Mirchi We tied-up with the most popular radio channel ‘Radio Mirchi – 98.3 FM’ which is heard in many Indian cities. The tie-up covered Delhi-NCR Lucknow Patna Varanasi Kanpur and included RJ mentions and ads among other things. The aim was to innovate for 16 days of Activism beginning with the men in the room. We also set up an Illustrate4Impact stall showcasing alkll the selected art at the Radio Mirchi x Vidya Vox concert that happened in Jawahar Lal Nehru Stadium in November 2017. Event in Raipur ‘Jashn Nayi Soch ka’ was an event conducted at the Pt Ravishankar University Raipur amongst 1200 youths academics activists and the community members. Chairperson Chattisgarh Commission of Women Ms. Harshita Pandey gave a moving speech emphasizing on the zero tolerance policy for violence against women and importance of youth to bring about more awareness. Event in Lukcnow We witnessed 1500 students from 40 colleges and 7 universities representatives from almost all major civil society organizations academicians media people gathered in the SNA lawn which was jam packed and buzzing with the talks of appropriateness of the campaign in context of unsafe environment of UP for women. Ms. Rita Bahuguna Joshi took it from where Nisha had ended her address and emphasized the need for similar transformational efforts to make a conducive environment for gender equality for violence free lives. She also asked to repeat similar programme after 6 months where she would come and see how this progressive thought is shaping into actions by youth. In her high energy speech she inspired the youth and narrated how she associated with Oxfam as early as in 90s and was a member of visiting team to New York and the drafting committee for a strategic document. Harassment survivor Varnika Kundu also joined the event motivating young girls to be brave and speak up about injustice and violence. Vanita Magazine: We tied up with Vanita Hindi Magazine to bring out a supplement along with their most popular December magazine issue. The ‘Bano NayiSoch’ supplement was published in collaboration with the magazine and was circulated to approx. 1.30 lakh people in the Hindi language belt by the publishers. Through the supplement we tried to give information to readers about Domestic Marriage Child Marriage social norms in a creative interactive format—game quiz cartoon strip jokes rhymes and stories.

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54 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 GOVERNANCE MANAGEMENT OXFAM INDIA BOARD: At the core of Oxfam India’s governance practices is the Oxfam India Board which ensures that the objectives of the organisation are met. It facilitates and exercises due diligence on how the management serves and protects long-term interests of stakeholders at the same time ensuring the highest standards of governance. The Board comprises of non- executive Directors and is supported by three sub-committees namely the Finance and Audit Committee the Nominations Committee and the Fundraising Committee. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE BOARD 1. Oversee policy formulation strategic thinking management supervision and accountability to supporters donors staff and those affected by its work. 2. Ensure that the views and concerns of key stakeholders are heard and addressed through efficient mechanisms and processes. 3. Provide strategic leadership to develop strategies manage proposals and challenge assumptions. 4. Recruit encourage and support the CEO while monitoring and evaluating his/her performance. 5. Determine the organisation’s mission purpose strategic direction and policies. 6. Steer the organisation to enable it to maintain a high level of accountability and transparency. BOARD MEETING DATES AND AGENDA Dates for the Board meetings are decided in advance. The Chief Executive Officer after consulting other Directors drafts the agenda for each meeting and prior to its finalisation circulates it to all members. The Board meets a minimum of four times in a calendar year. No business is transacted at any meeting unless a quorum exists. All statutory business is carried out in the Annual General Meeting which is held within six months of the close of the financial year. S no Name Designation 3-Jun-17 2-Sep-17 13-Dec-17 10-Mar-18 1 Kiran Sharadchandr Karnik Chair Yes Yes Yes 2 Mridula Bajaj Vice Chair Yes Yes Yes Yes 3 Ammu Joseph Member Director Yes Yes Yes Yes 4 Ammu Joseph Member Director Yes Yes Yes 5 Neelam Deo Member Director Yes Yes Yes 6 Sutapa Banerjee Member Director Yes Yes 7 Anita Ramachandran Member Director Yes Yes 8 Santosh Desai Member Director Yes Yes Yes Yes 9 Gagan Siriram Sethi Member Director Yes Yes Yes 10 Anup Singh Khosla Member Director Yes Yes Yes Yes 11 Arjun Jayadev Member Director Yes Yes 12 Tanweer Fazal Member Director Yes Yes

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55 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 Kiran Karnik took over as the Chairperson of Oxfam India Board in August 2010. He was the President of the National Association of Software and Services Companies NASSCOM and the Managing Director of the Discovery Network in India. He served as the Founder-Director of the Consortium for Educational Communication and the Indian Space Research Organisation. Awarded the Padma Shri in 2007 he is on numerous Government committees and has been a member of the Scientific Advisory Council to the previous Prime Minister and Central Employment Guarantee Council. Mridula Bajaj is a specialist in Child Development with more than three decades of experience in programme research and training. She took over as the Vice Chairperson of the Oxfam India Board in August 2010 and has been a Board member since its inception. Holding a Master’s degree in Science and Child Development from Lady Irwin College Delhi University she has worked extensively for empowerment of women and child development. Ammu Joseph is a journalist and author who writes primarily on issues relating to gender human development and the media. She began her career in Mumbai in the mid-1970s. Since then she has been contributing to a number of newspapers and magazines. She received the Donna Allen Award for Feminist Advocacy from the US-based Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication and the UNFPA-LAADLI Media Award for Gender Sensitivity in recognition of her consistent engagement with gender issues. She is a founder-member of the Network of Women in Media India. Neelam Deo is a former Indian Foreign Service IFS officer who served as India’s Ambassador to Denmark and Cote d’Ivoire with concurrent accreditation to Sierra Leone Niger S Guinea. After serving 33 years in the IFS she co-founded Gateway House: Indian Council on Global Relations in 2009. She is also a distinguished fellow with the Centre for Air Power Studies and a member of the Advisory Board of the Morgan Stanley Mutual Fund. Neelam is also a frequent commentator on issues that involve India’s economic emergence diaspora and global politics. Anup Khosla was the Chief Financial Officer of HelpAge India from May 2003 to March 2012 and thereafter Financial Advisor till his retirement. Since then he has consulted with NASSCOM Foundation as their Financial Advisor and Mobile Creches to review their Accounting processes. He is currently a member of Mobile Creches’ General Body Accounts and Audit Committee and ERP Advisory Committee. Prior to joining HelpAge India he was in the corporate world for 28 years. Gagan Sethi has over 30 years of experience in organizational development capacity building and advocacy at local national international levels in diverse cultural settings in Asia. He is a recognised leader in policy formulation facilitating development projects and advocate for minority rights. He is the founder of ten development organizations working on areas of human institutional development access to legal justice women empowerment conflict management minority and dalit rights as well as youth employment and education. BOARD MEMBERS KIRAN KARNIK Chairperson MRIDULA BAJAJ Vice Chairperson AMU JOSEPH Board Member NEELAM DEO Board Member ANUP KHOSLA Board Member GAGAN SETHI Board Member

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56 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 As a political sociologist Tanweer Fazal specializes in sociology of nationalism community formation and identifications with specific focus on their implications on discourse of rights and entitlements. Fazal was a faculty at the Nelson Mandela Centre for Peace and Conflict Resolution Jamia Millia Islamia from 2006 to 2014. He has been a Research Consultant with Prime Minister’s High Level Committee Sachar Committee 2006 wherein he worked specifically on status stratification with particular reference to the OBCs among the Muslims of India. Somasekhar Sundaresan is a partner with J. Sagar Associates a large national law firm in India. He heads the firm’s securities law and financial sector regulatory practice. He has experience and expertise in advising clients in the area of foreign investment banking and the financial institutional sector mergers and acquisitions particularly those involving listed companies. He has advised a number of banks security issuers stockbrokers mutual funds non-banking financial companies stock exchanges and foreign institutional investors. Santosh Desai is the Managing Director and CEO of Future Brands Ltd. He has been the President of McCann-Erickson one of India’s premier advertising agencies. He has served on the boards of ING Vysya Bank ACK Media Limited Future Consumer Products Limited Breakthrough and CFAR Centre for Advocacy Research and on the Governing Councils of Mudra Institute of Communication and Praxis Business School. He writes a weekly column for The Times of India. Anita Ramachandran is a human resource expert with over 35 years of experience as a management consultant. She has been a strategic advisor to many family groups and small and medium enterprise companies. She has been the Chairperson of TIE Women and on the Executive committee of TIE Mumbai and earlier on the Advertising Standards Council of India. Anita is an independent Director on the board of Aditya Birla Retail Geometric Ltd. Godrej Boyce and Rane. Sutapa Banerjee has over 23 years of experience across two multinational banks in the financial services industry. She has built and led the business of banks in the last 16 years. She is well recognised as a thought leader in the Wealth Management industry. The Institutional Investor Group has voted her as one of the ‘Top 20 Global Rising Stars of Wealth Management’. She drove Ambit Private Wealth to be the ‘Best Private Bank in India’ in the 2013 Asia Money Polls. She was shortlisted in the ‘50 most powerful women in India’ by Fortune India in 2012. Arjun Jayadev is a Professor of Economics at the School of Liberal Studies at Azim Premji University Bangalore. He has also worked as an Associate Professor of Economics at University of Massachusetts Boston as a Fellow at Roosevelt Institute New York and as the visiting research Fellow at the Columbia University Committee on Global Thought New York. His research interests are economics development with focus across multiple areas such as macroeconomics income distribution and inequality intellectual property and the economics of power. Arjun is also the co-editor of ‘The Journal of Globalization and Development’ since 2013. TANWEER FAZAL Board Member SOMASEKHAR SUNDARESAN Board Member SANTOSH DESAI Board Member ANITA RAMACHANDRAN Board Member SUTAPA BANERJEE Board Member ARJUN JAYADEV Board Member

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57 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 Amitabh is a civil society leader and former Executive Director of National Foundation for India. He is recognised for his work on governance accountability social and economic equality and citizen participation. He is one of the leading experts of people-centred advocacy and chairs organisational boards of Navsarjan and Yuva NGO. He is the vice board chair of CIVICUS and also sits on the board of other organisations like Centre for Budget and Governance Accountability Mobile Crèche VANI Global Fund for Community Foundation. Satya Prakash has 28 plus years of experience of which 16 years have been in the Development Sector with organizations such as VHAI CARE India CHF ACCESS and BREAKTHROUGH. He led a large team which managed systems and procedures putting in place policies to ensure a smooth and effective working environment. He comes with a degree in Chartered Accountancy and has vast experience of working in ERP packages. Ranu has been working in the development sector for almost 30 years. She has extensive experience on issues related to Gender Natural resource management Sustainable development with a special focus on rural development. She has several years of hands on field experience of working with Dalit and Tribal communities. She has been involved in Policy analysis and dialogues on issues of rural livelihoods environment and forest rights. Pankaj is a professional with over two decades of rich relevant and varied experience in programme management evidence-based advocacy knowledge management development communication and resource mobilisation in India and South Asia. He has worked on a wide canvas of issues including Public Health Gender Citizen Action Governance Sustainable Development and the issues of Farmers and Adivasis. Pankaj has looked at all issues within a rights-based framework. Rina is a financial sector professional with over 18 years of experience in sales and business development strategic planning and marketing across consumer finance and insurance industry. She was part of the founder’s team at Max Life Insurance and has been well recognized for her contributions in the many roles she straddled within the organisation. She last worked as Vice President Marketing with Max Life Insurance Co. Ltd. Tejas is a communication professional with extensive experience of over 17 years in leading media houses as well as international human rights organization Amnesty International. A core member of the Oxfam Senior Leadership Team Tejas works on creating compelling strategies to engage the public on Oxfam India’s public campaigns and work on the ground. AMITABH BEHAR Chief Executive Officer SATYA PRAKASH Director Operations RANU BHOGAL Director - Policy Research Campaigns PANKAJ ANAND Director - Programme Advocacy RINA SONI Director - Public Engagement TEJAS PATEL Deputy Director - Public Engagement SENIOR LEADERSHIP TEAM

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58 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 IN OUR CONTINUOUS EFFORT TO MAKE OXFAM INDIA A BETTER WORKPLACE WE KEEP LOOKING FOR VARIOUS WAYS IN WHICH OUR HUMAN RESOURCES STAY ENGAGED AND MOTIVATED TO IMPROVE PRODUCTIVITY. Highlights for FY 2017-18 1. Oxfam India’s HR plays a significant role in securing the future success of our organization with a long-term vision to create a thriving environment for employees in enabling them to achieve excellence. First and foremost we made progress in HR functionality in defining and managing controls. 2. We reviewed and completed the implementation of our staff book. We introduced online HRIS platform for various HR functions and tools like HR Recruit and Leave Management automation that has simplified the work with an easy access portal for employee profiles and required data. 3. Our responsibility is to build a secure foundation for which we reviewed and conducted an orientation training on Child Protection Policy and it is now implemented in the roots of our functionality. 4. We conducted a Staff Satisfaction Survey to understand employee job satisfaction and in accordance build positive employee relations and work environment. We also participated in the study conducted by other similar organizations to further understand the importance of employee engagements. Our analysis for 2017-18 employee turnover is 18 which is 50 less than last year. Thus an increase in employee retention. 5. Our streak of zero reports on cases of sexual harassment at work continues and we believe in further strengthening our policy of “no tolerance”. To create a holistic environment for women especially new mothers at Oxfam India we increased the maternity benefit to 26 weeks complying with the Maternity Benefit Amendment Bill 2016 India. OPERATIONS OPERATIONS Annual Retreat 2017

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59 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT To the Members of Oxfam India Report on the Audit of the Financial Statements We have audited the accompanying financial statements of OXFAM INDIA“the Company” which comprise the Balance Sheet as at 31 March 2018 the Statement of Income and Expenditure Account the Cash Flow Statement for the year then ended and a summary of the significant accounting policies and other explanatory information. Management’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements The Company’s Board of Directors is responsible for the matters stated in Section 1345 of the Companies Act 2013 “the Act” with respect to the preparation of these financial statements that give a true and fair view of the financial position financial performance and cash flows of the Company in accordance with the accounting principles generally accepted in India including the Accounting Standards prescribed under section 133 of the Act read with Rule 7 of the Companies Accounts Rule 2014. This responsibility also includes maintenance of adequate accounting records in accordance with the provisions of the Act for safeguarding the assets of the Company and for preventing and detecting frauds and other irregularities selection and application of appropriate accounting policies making judgments and estimates that are reasonable and prudent and design implementation and maintenance of adequate internal financial controls that were operating effectively for ensuring the accuracy and completeness of the accounting records relevant to the preparation and presentation of the financial statements that give a true and fair view and are free from material misstatement whether due to fraud or error. In preparing the financial statements management is responsible for assessing the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern disclosing as applicable matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless management either intends to liquidate the Company or to cease operations or has no realistic alternative but to do so. Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We have taken into account the provisions of the Act the accounting and auditing standards and matters which are required to be included in the audit report under the provisions of the Act and the Rules made thereunder. We conducted our audit of the financial statements in accordance with the Standards on Auditing specified under Section 14310 of the Act. Those Standards require that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and the disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments the auditor considers internal financial control relevant to the Company’s preparation of the financial statements that give a true and fair view in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of the accounting policies used and the reasonableness of the accounting estimates made by the Company’s Directors as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We are also responsible to conclude on the appropriateness of management’s use of the going concern basis of accounting and based on the audit evidence obtained whether a material uncertainty

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60 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If we conclude that a material uncertainty exists we are required to draw attention in the auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial statements or if such disclosures are inadequate to modify the opinion. Our conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of the auditor’s report. However future events or conditions may cause an entity to cease to continue as a going concern. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion on the financial statements. Opinion In our opinion and to the best of our information and according to the explanations given to us the aforesaid financial statements give the information required by the Act in the manner so required and give a true and fair view in conformity with the accounting principles generally accepted in India of the state of affairs of the Company as at 31 March 2018 its excess of expenditure over income and its cash flows for the year ended on that date. REPORT ON OTHER LEGAL AND REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS 1. The Company is licensed to operate under Section 8 of the Companies Act 2013 “the Act”. Accordingly the Companies Auditor’s Report Order 2016 issued by the Central Government of India in terms of sub-section 11 of the section 143 is not applicable. 2. As required by Section 1433 of the Act we report that: a We have sought and obtained all the information and explanations which to the best of our knowledge and belief were necessary for the purposes of our audit b In our opinion proper books of account as required by law have been kept by the Company so far as it appears from our examination of those books c The Balance Sheet the Statement of Income and Expenditure Account and the Cash Flow Statement dealt with by this Report are in agreement with the books of account d In our opinion the aforesaid financial statements comply with the Accounting Standards prescribed under section 133 of the Act read with Rule 7 of the Companies Accounts Rule 2014 e On the basis of the written representations received from the directors as on 31 March 2018 taken on record by the Board of Directors none of the directors is disqualified as on 31 March 2018 from being appointed as a director in terms of Section 1642 of the Act f With respect to the adequacy of the internal financial controls with reference to financial statements of the Company and the operating effectiveness of such controls refer to our separate Report in “Annexure A” g With respect to the other matters to be included in the Auditor’s Report in accordance with Rule 11 of the Companies Audit and Auditors Rules 2014 in our opinion and to the best of our information and according to the explanations given to us: i. The Company does not have any pending litigations which would impact its financial position ii. The Company did not have any long-term contracts including derivative contracts for which there were any material foreseeable losses iii. There were no amounts which were required to be transferred to the Investor Education and Protection Fund by the Company. iv. The disclosures in the financial statements regarding holdings as well as dealings in specified bank notes during the period from 8 November 2016 to 30 December 2016 have not been made since they do not pertain to the financial year ended 31 March 2018. However amounts as appearing in the audited financial statements for the period ended 31 March 2017 have been disclosed – Refer to note 31 to the financial statements. For BSR Associates LLP Chartered Accountants Firm’s Registration No 116231W/W-100024 Sandeep Batra Partner Membership no. 093320 Place: Gurugram Date: 8 September 2018

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61 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 We have audited the internal financial controls over financial statements with reference to financial statements of OXFAM INDIA “the Company” as of 31 March 2018 in conjunction with our audit of the financial statements of the Company for the year ended on that date. Management’s Responsibility for Internal Financial Controls The Company’s management is responsible for establishing and maintaining internal financial controls based on the internal control over financial statement criteria established by the Company considering the essential components of internal control stated in the Guidance Note on ‘ Audit of Internal Financial Controls Over Financial Reporting’ issued by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India ‘ICAI’. These responsibilities include the design implementation and maintenance of adequate internal financial controls that were operating effectively for ensuring the orderly and efficient conduct of its business including adherence to company’s policies the safeguarding of its assets the prevention and detection of frauds and errors the accuracy and completeness of the accounting records and the timely preparation of reliable financial information as required under the Act. Auditors’ Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal financial controls over financial statements with reference to financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with the Guidance Note on Audit of Internal Financial Controls Over Financial Reporting the “Guidance Note” and the Standards on Auditing issued by ICAI and deemed to be prescribed under section 14310 of the Act to the extent applicable to an audit of internal financial controls both applicable to an audit of Internal Financial Controls and both issued by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India. Those Standards and the Guidance Note require that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether adequate internal financial controls with reference to financial statements was established and maintained and if such controls operated effectively in all material respects. ANNEXURE A REFERRED TO IN THE INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT OF EVEN DATE TO THE MEMBERS OF OXFAM INDIA BEING REPORT ON THE INTERNAL FINANCIAL CONTROLS UNDER CLAUSE I OF SUB-SECTION 3 OF SECTION 143 OF THE COMPANIES ACT 2013 “THE ACT” Our audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the adequacy of the internal financial controls system with reference to the financial statements and their operating effectiveness. Our audit of internal financial controls with reference to financial statements included obtaining an understanding of internal financial controls with reference to financial statements assessing the risk that a material weakness exists and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements whether due to fraud or error. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion on the Company’s internal financial controls system over financial statements. Meaning of Internal Financial Controls with reference to Financial Statements A company’s internal financial control with reference to financial statements is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial statements and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal financial control with reference to financial statements includes those policies and procedures that 1 pertain to the maintenance of records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company 2 provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorisations of management and directors of the company and 3 provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorised acquisition use or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements. Inherent Limitations of Internal Financial Controls with reference to Financial Statements

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62 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 For BSR Associates LLP Chartered Accountants Firm’s Registration No 116231W/W-100024 Sandeep Batra Partner Membership no. 093320 Place: Gurugram Date: 8 September 2018 Because of the inherent limitations of internal financial controls with reference to financial statements including the possibility of collusion or improper management override of controls material misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected. Also projections of any evaluation of the internal financial controls with reference to Financial Statements to future periods are subject to the risk that the internal financial control with reference to financial statements may become inadequate because of changes in conditions or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Opinion In our opinion the Company has in all material respects an adequate internal financial controls system with reference to the financial statements and such internal financial controls with reference to the financial statements were operating effectively as at 31 March 2018 based on the internal control with reference to financial statements criteria established by the Company considering the essential components of internal control stated in the Guidance Note on Audit of Internal Financial Controls Over Financial Reporting issued by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India.

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63 Note As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 EQUITY AND LIABILITIES Corpus fund 2 4484 4484 Reserves and surplus 3 104036 152045 Capital assets fund 4 13675 13940 122195 170469 Non-current liabilities Other long term liabilities 7 86 11 Long-term provisions 5 9999 8017 10085 8028 Current liabilities Trade payables 6 Dues to micro and small enterprises 1190 895 Dues to others 15561 11276 Other current liabilities 7 99838 49480 Short-term provisions 5 1772 1502 118361 63153 TOTAL 250641 241650 ASSETS Non-current assets Property plant and equipment 8 8293 9845 Intangible assets 9 5384 4096 Long-term loans and advances 10 13372 13458 Other non-current assets 12 1890 - 28939 27399 Current assets Cash and bank balances 11 165696 160827 Short-term loans and advances 10 24958 10304 Other current assets 12 31048 43120 221702 214251 TOTAL 250641 241650 Significant accounting policies 1 The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements. As per our report of even date For B S R Associates LLP Chartered Accountants Firm Registration No.: 116231W/ W-100024 Kiran Karnik Mridula Bajaj Director Director Sandeep Batra DIN: 00542951 DIN: 02029817 Partner Membership No.: 093320 Place: Gurugram Amitabh Behar Satya Prakash Mishra Date : 08 September 2018 Chief Executive Officer Director Operations Place: New Delhi Place: New Delhi Date : 08 September 2018 Date : 08 September 2018 For and on behalf of the Board of Directors of Oxfam India BALANCE SHEET AS OF 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND NOTES FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND NOTES

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64 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 OXFAM INDIA Statement of Income and Expenditure account for the year ended 31 March 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated Note For the year ended 31 March 2018 For the year ended 31 March 2017 INCOME Grants/ Donations 13 559200 568849 Other income 14 12900 16463 TOTAL INCOME I 572100 585312 EXPENDITURE Programme expenses 15 310704 298003 Fundraising cost 16 59525 34260 Employee benefit expenses 17 164483 135517 Co-ordination and administration costs 18 78314 89073 Capitalised assets purchased 19 6987 4647 Prior period expenses 20 96 378 TOTAL EXPENDITURE II 620109 561878 Excess of expenditure over income I-II / excess of income over expenditure 48009 23434 Significant accounting policies 1 The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements. As per our report of even date For B S R Associates LLP Chartered Accountants Firm Registration No.: 116231W/ W-100024 Kiran Karnik Mridula Bajaj Sandeep Batra Director Director Partner DIN: 00542951 DIN: 02029817 Membership No.: 093320 Place: Gurugram Amitabh Behar Satya Prakash Mishra Date : 08 September 2018 Chief Executive Officer Director Operations Place: New Delhi Place: New Delhi Date : 08 September 2018 Date : 08 September 2018 For and on behalf of the Board of Directors of Oxfam India STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA

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65 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 OXFAM INDIA Cash flow statement for the year ended 31 March 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated For the year ended 31 March 2018 For the year ended 31 March 2017 A. Cash flow from operating activities Excess of income over expenditure Surplus/Deficit 48009 23434 Adjustments for: Capitalised assets purchased 6987 4647 Interest income on fixed deposits 7796 12965 Lease Equalisation Reserve - 2 Profit on sale of fixed assets 379 123 Unrealised foreign exchange gain 482 - Operating cash flow before working capital changes 49679 14995 Increase / Decrease in provisions 2252 3332 Increase/ Decrease in trade payables 4580 10596 Increase / Decrease in other current and long term liabilities 48920 125755 Decrease/ Increase in loans and advances 13789 8682 Decrease in other assets 9215 3301 1499 119307 Net Income taxes paid including tax deducted at source 779 1443 Net cash generated from operating activities A 720 120750 B. Cash flows from investing activities Purchase of fixed assets 4992 3858 Proceeds from sale of fixed assets 379 123 Investments in bank deposits having original maturity of more than 3 months 30515 79300 Interest received on bank deposits 10652 12770 Net cash from investing activities B 24476 88335 C. Cash flows from financing activities Addition to corpus fund - - Net cash from financing activities C - - Net increase in cash and cash equivalents A + B +C 23756 32415 72082 104498 48326 72082 Components of cash and cash equivalents Cash on hand 2 5 Cheques in hand 16 11 Balances with banks: - in saving accounts 48308 72066 Total cash and cash equivalents note 11 48326 72082 As per our report of even date For B S R Associates LLP Chartered Accountants Firm Registration No.: 116231W/ W-100024 Kiran Karnik Mridula Bajaj Director Director Sandeep Batra DIN: 00542951 DIN: 02029817 Partner Membership No.: 093320 Place: Gurugram Amitabh Behar Satya Prakash Mishra Date : 08 September 2018 Chief Executive Officer Director Operations Place: New Delhi Place: New Delhi Date : 08 September 2018 Date : 08 September 2018 For and on behalf of the Board of Directors of Oxfam India Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the year Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the year Note: The above Cash Flow Statement has been prepared in accordance with the Indirect method as set out in the Accounting Standard - 3 on Cash Flow Statements prescribed under section 133 of the Companies Act 2013 ‘Act’ read with Rule 7 of the Companies Accounts Rules 2014. CASH FLOW STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA

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66 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA Background Oxfam India the Company is a not for profit Company limited by guarantee without share capital incorporated u/s 25 of the Indian Companies Act 1956 corresponding to Section 8 of the new Companies Act 2013 with its registered office at New Delhi. The Company is a rights based organization that fight poverty injustice and exclusion by linking grassroots programming through partner NGOs to local national and global advocacy and policy making. Note 1: Significant accounting policies a Accounting Convention The financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention on an accrual basis in accordance with the applicable Accounting Standards specified under section 133 of the Companies Act 2013 read together with Rule 7 of Companies Accounts Rules 2014 the other relevant provisions of Companies Act 2013 including provisions of Companies Act 1956 which continue to remain in force to the extent applicable. The financial statements are presented in INR Rupees and all values are rounded to the nearest thousands except when otherwise indicated. b Current–non-current classification The financial statements are presented as per Schedule III to the Companies Act 2013. All assets and liabilities have been classified as current or non-current as per the Company’s normal operating cycle and other criteria set out in the revised Schedule III to the Companies Act 2013. Based on the nature of activities of the Company the Company has determined its operating cycle as 12 months for the purpose of classification of its assets and liabilities as current and noncurrent. All assets and liabilities are classified into current and non-current based on below criteria: Assets An asset is classified as current when it satisfies any of the following criteria: i it is expected to be realised in or is intended for sale or consumption in the Company’s normal operating cycle ii it is held primarily for the purpose of being traded iii it is expected to be realised within 12 months after the reporting date or iv it is cash or cash equivalent unless it is restricted from being exchanged or used to settle a liability for at least 12 months after the reporting date. Current assets include the current portion of non-current financial assets. All other assets are classified as non-current.

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67 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 Liabilities A liability is classified as current when it satisfies any of the following criteria: i it is expected to be settled in the Company’s normal operating cycle ii it is held primarily for the purpose of being traded iii it is due to be settled within 12 months after the reporting date or iv the Company does not have an unconditional right to defer settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the reporting date. Terms of a liability that could at the option of the counterparty result in its settlement by the issue of equity instruments do not affect its classification. Current liabilities include current portion of non-current financial liabilities. All other liabilities are classified as non-current. c Use of estimates The preparation of the financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires the management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reporting balances of assets and liabilities and disclosures relating to contingent assets and liabilities as at the date of the financial statements and reporting amounts of income and expenses during the year. Contingencies are recorded when it is probable that a liability will be incurred and the amount can be reasonably estimated. Actual results could differ from such estimates. d Accounting for grants/donations i Unrestricted/ General Fund The Company receives general funds which are unrestricted from donors. The excess of income over expenditure during the year being general purpose in nature is carried forward for use in the future periods. ii Restricted Fund Only those Grants / Donations are accounted for as income which have been accrued and become due as per the sanctions of the funding / donor agencies. These are held by the Company until used for the purpose specified against them. At the end of the agreement the un-utilised restricted fund is returned to the respective donor in case unutilised amount is not required to be returned to the respective donor the same is transfered to statement of income and expenditure in the relevant year in which the project is completed. The income is recognized to the extent of expenditure incurred during the year. iii Donation in kind Donations received in kind are not valued or accounted for in the books of account. iv Interest Income Interest income is recognized on a time proportion basis taking into account the amount outstanding and the interest rate applicable. Interest income is included under the head “Other income” in the statement of income and expenditure. NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA

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68 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA e Expenditure Grants made to other partners/projects are accounted for in the year of expenditure by the concerned partner/ amount spent on the projects. Refunds of unutilised grants with partners which have been refunded to the Company have been reduced from grants paid to partners in the year in which it is received. f Provisions and contingent liabilities Provision A provision is recognized when the Company has a present obligation as a result of past event it is probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. Provisions are not discounted to their present value and are determined based on the best estimate required to settle the obligation at the reporting date. These estimates are reviewed at each reporting date and adjusted to reflect the current best estimates. Contingent liability A contingent liability is a possible obligation that arises from past events whose existence will be confirmed by the occurrence or non-occurrence of one or more uncertain future events beyond the control of the company or a present obligation that is not recognized because it is not probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation. A contingent liability also arises in extremely rare cases where there is a liability that cannot be recognized because it cannot be measured reliably. The Company does not recognize a contingent liability but discloses its existence in the financial statements. g Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents for the purpose of cash flow statements comprise cash at bank and in hand and short-term investments with an original maturity period of three months or less. h Income Tax The Company is exempt from income tax under Section 12AA of the Income Tax Act 1961 and hence no provision for taxation is required for current year tax expense. Since the Company is exempt from income tax no deferred tax asset or liability is recognized in respect of timing differences. i Property plant and equipment Property plant and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation/amortization and impairment losses if any. Cost includes purchase price and all other attributable costs of bringing the assets to working condition for intended use. Assets purchased out of grants received are capitalised and an equal amount is transferred to Capital Fund. Accordingly deletions of such fixed assets are also adjusted from the Capital Fund. Assets received as donations are capitalised at nil value. There were no such receipts during the year.

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69 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 j Depreciation on property plant and equipment Depreciation on fixed assets except intangible assets is provided on the written down value method at rates prescribed under Schedule XIV of the Companies Act 2013 Particulars Life in years Office equipment 5 Vehicles 8 Computers excluding server network 3 Computers for server network 6 Furniture and fittings 10 Leasehold improvements are amortised on a straight line basis over the lower of lease term or useful life of the respective assets. Depreciation on fixed assets purchased out of grants received is debited to the Capital Fund. k Intangible assets Intangible assets acquired separately are measured on initial recognition at cost. Following initial recognition intangible assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortization and accumulated impairment losses if any. Intangible assets are amortized on a straight line basis over their useful lives of one to five years as technically assessed. The amortisation period and the amortisation method are reviewed at least at each financial year end. If the expected useful life of the asset is significantly different from previous estimates the amortisation period is changed accordingly. If there has been a significant change in the expected pattern of economic benefits from the asset the amortisation method is changed to reflect the changed pattern. Such changes are accounted for in accordance with AS 5 Net Profit or Loss for the Period Prior Period Items and Changes in Accounting Policies. A summary of amortisation policies applied to the company’s intangible assets is as below: Name of Intangible Asset Life in years Website development cost 3 Computer software 5 l Foreign exchange transactions Foreign exchange transactions are recorded at the rates of exchange prevailing on the date of the transaction. Realised gains and losses on foreign exchange transactions during the year are recognised in the Statement of income and expenditure account. Foreign currency assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies at the year-end are translated into rupees at the year-end rates and resultant gains/losses on foreign exchange translations are recognised in the Statement of income and expenditure account. NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA

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70 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA m Employee benefits i Gratuity liability is a defined benefit obligation and is provided for on the basis of an actuarial valuation on projected unit credit method made at the end of each financial year. The scheme is funded with an insurance company in the form of a qualifying insurance policy. The gratuity benefit obligation recognized in the balance sheet represents the present value of the obligations as reduced by the fair value of assets held by the Insurance Company. Actuarial gain/losses are recognised immediately in the statement of income and expenditure account. ii Retirement benefits in the form of Provident Fund is a defined contribution scheme and the contributions are charged to the income and expenditure account of the year when the contributions to the respective funds are due. There are no other obligations other than the contribution payable to the respective fund. iii Accumulated leave which is expected to be utilized within the next twelve months is treated as short term employee benefit and the accumulated leave expected to be carried forward beyond twelve months is treated as long – term employee benefit for measurement purposes. Accumulated compensated absences are provided for based on actuarial valuation using the projected unit credit method at the end of each financial year but classified as current since there is no unconditional right to defer its settlement for twelve months after the reporting date. n Lease commitment Operating Lease - Where the Company is lessee Leases where the lessor effectively retains substantially all the risks and benefits of ownership of the leased asset are classified as operating leases. Operating lease charges are recognised as an expense in the income and expenditure account on a straight-line basis over the lease term. o Segment reporting The Company is a rights - based organization that works for economic welfare by fighting against poverty injustice and exclusion by linking grassroots programming through partner NGOs to local national and global advocacy and policy making. Since the Company has only one business segment of ‘economic welfare’ and one geographic segment ‘India’ based on operations of the Company information for primary business segment and secondary geographic segment is not applicable. p Impairment of Property plant and equipment The carrying amounts of assets are reviewed at each reporting date. Impairment is recognised wherever the carrying amount of an asset exceeds its recoverable amount. Recoverable amount is greater of the asset’s net selling price and the value in use. After impairment depreciation is provided on the revised carrying amount of the aseet over its remaining useful life. A previously recognised impairment loss is increased or reversed depending on the changes in circumstances. However the carrying value after reversal is not increased beyond the carrying value that would have prevailed by charging usual depreciation as if there was no impairment.

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71 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 OXFAM INDIA Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 March 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 As at 31 March 2016 NOTE 2 : Corpus fund Corpus Fund Balance as per last financial statements 4484 4484 4484 Closing Balance 4484 4484 4484 NOTE 3: Reserves and surplus General fund Balance as per last financial statements 123545 100111 82905 Add: Excess of expenditure over income transferred from 48009 23434 17206 Statement of income and expenditure account Closing balance A 75536 123545 100111 Designated funds Special reserve fund - catastrophe fund Restricted reserve - catastrophe fund 13500 13500 13500 Closing Balance B 13500 13500 13500 Special reserve fund - contingency fund Restricted reserve - contingency fund 15000 15000 15000 Closing Balance C 15000 15000 15000 Total A + B + C 104036 152045 128611 NOTE 4: Capital assets fund Balance as per last financial statements 13940 18169 18090 Add: Additions during the year 6987 4647 4647 20927 22816 22737 Less: Depreciation and amortization for the year 7252 8876 8873 Closing balance 13675 13940 13864 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA

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72 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 OXFAM INDIA Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 March 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated NOTE 5: Provisions As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 Provision for employee benefits Provision for gratuity note 21 - - - - Provision for leave benefits 9999 8017 1772 1502 9999 8017 1772 1502 NOTE 6: Trade Payables As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 Trade payables Dues to micro and small enterprises 1190 895 Others 15561 11276 16751 12171 As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 1190 895 - - - - - - - - - - 1190 895 NOTE 7: Other liabilities As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 Grants/Donations received in advance - - 97271 46096 TDS payable - - 1001 3259 Other duties and taxes payable - - 21 - Lease equalisation reserve 86 11 32 125 Payable on purchase of property plant and equipment - - 1513 - 86 11 99838 49480 Non-current Current Particulars Non-current Current The Ministry of Micro Small and Medium Enterprises has issued an Office Memorandum dated 26 August 2008 which recommends that the Micro and Small Enterprises should mention in their correspondence with its customers the Entrepreneurs Memorandum Number as allocated after filing of the Memorandum. Based on the information presently available with the management the disclosures required under Micro Small and Medium Enterprises Development Act 2006 “MSMED Act” are given below: -The principal amount remaining unpaid to any supplier as at the end of the year -The interest due on the principal remaining outstanding as at the end of the year -The amount of interest paid under the MSMED Act along with the amounts of the payment made beyond the appointed day during the year -The amount of interest due and payable for the period of delay in making payment which have been paid but beyond the appointed day during the year but without adding the interest specified under the MSMED Act -The amount of interest accrued and remaining unpaid at the end of the year -The amount of further interest remaining due and payable even in the succeeding years until such date when the interest dues as above are actually paid to the small enterprise for the purpose of disallowance as a deductible expenditure under the MSMED Act NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA

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73 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA OXFAM INDIA Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 March 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated NOTE 8: Property plant and equipment Leasehold improvements Office equipment Furniture and fittings Computers Vehicles Total Cost or valuation As at 1 April 2016 5932 15221 8116 23670 5452 58391 Additions - 1176 54 1744 - 2974 Disposals - 2328 1768 3563 54 7713 As at 31 March 2017 5932 14069 6402 21851 5398 53652 Additions - 1265 202 2072 - 3539 Disposals - 1060 143 2937 - 4140 As at 31 March 2018 5932 14274 6461 20986 5398 53051 Accumulated Depreciation As at 1 April 2016 5932 10661 6981 17607 3629 44810 Charge for the year - 2358 402 3380 570 6710 Disposals - 2328 1768 3563 54 7713 As at 31 March 2017 5932 10691 5615 17424 4145 43807 Charge for the year 1659 228 2789 415 5091 Disposals - 1060 143 2937 - 4140 As at 31 March 2018 5932 11290 5700 17276 4560 44758 Net Property plant and equipment As at 31 March 2017 0 3378 787 4427 1253 9845 As at 31 March 2018 0 2984 761 3710 838 8293 NOTE 9: Intangible assets Computer software Website development cost Total Cost or valuation As at 1 April 2016 4986 3739 8725 Additions 324 1349 1673 Disposals - - - As at 31 March 2017 5310 5088 10398 Additions 1380 2068 3448 Disposals - - - As at 31 March 2018 6690 7156 13846 Accumulated Amortisation As at 1 April 2016 2002 2136 4138 Charge for the year 999 1164 2164 Disposals - - - As at 31 March 2017 3001 3300 6301 Charge for the year 1065 1096 2161 Disposals - - - As at 31 March 2018 4066 4396 8462 Net intangible assets As at 31 March 2017 2309 1788 4096 As at 31 March 2018 2624 2760 5384

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74 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA OXFAM INDIA Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 March 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated NOTE 10: Loans and advances As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 Security deposits Unsecured considered good 9090 9955 1233 900 A 9090 9955 1233 900 Advances recoverable in cash or in kind Unsecured considered good - - 18476 4964 B - - 18476 4964 Other loan and advances Tax deducted at Source TDS 4282 3503 - - Prepaid expenses - - 5174 4358 Loan to employees - - 75 82 C 4282 3503 5249 4440 Total A + B + C 13372 13458 24958 10304 NOTE 11: Cash and bank balances As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 Cash on hand 2 5 Cheques/draft in hand 16 11 Balances with banks: - in saving accounts 46418 72066 46436 72082 Other bank balances: Deposits with original maturity for more than 12 months 22060 - Deposits with original maturity for more than 3 months but less than 12 months 97200 68985 Deposits with original maturity for less than 3 months - 19760 119260 88745 165696 160827 NOTE 12: Other assets Unsecured considered good As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 Other bank balances Deposits with original maturity for more than 12 months note 11 1890 - - - Other receivable Employee benefit plan surplus note 21 - - 2567 4531 Interest accrued on fixed deposits - - 2654 5510 Capital advances - - 77 560 Grants/Donations receivable - - 25750 32519 1890 - 31048 43120 Non - current Current Current Non - current

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75 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA OXFAM INDIA Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 March 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated For the year ended 31 March 2018 For the year ended 31 March 2017 NOTE 13: Grants/ Donations Grants from affiliates 333036 306726 In-house fundraising: Donation - corporate and institutions 47833 85515 Donation - individuals 34132 40665 Donation - affiliates humanitarian 87417 88413 Donation - events 56782 47530 559200 568849 NOTE 14: Other income Interest income - Bank deposits 7796 12965 - Saving bank a/c 2803 2557 Profit on sale of fixed assets 379 123 Exchange differences net 376 - Other non-operating income 1546 818 12900 16463 NOTE 15: Programme expenses Grant paid to Partners refer note 28 117655 122294 Humanitarian response including relief materials 115507 109953 Workshops and consultation charges 68203 59255 Programme evaluation and training cost 9339 6501 310704 298003

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76 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 OXFAM INDIA Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 March 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated For the year ended 31 March 2018 For the year ended 31 March 2017 NOTE 16: Fundraising cost Retainership fees 11703 5977 Other fundraising expenses 47822 28283 59525 34260 NOTE 17: Employee benefit expenses Salary wages and bonus - Programme staffs 76395 65401 - Fundraising staffs 23922 19669 - Other staffs 40714 33403 Contribution to provident fund 9266 7898 Gratuity refer note 21 1986 1601 Leave benefits 3023 1834 Staff welfare expenses 4775 4230 Training recruitment expenses 4402 5149 164483 135517 NOTE 18: Co-ordination and administration costs Rent refer note 22 24915 25510 Travelling and conveyance 21966 26118 Communication costs 5168 5039 Repair and maintenance - Computers 1169 1293 - Other than computers 9790 13120 Electricity charges 2486 2594 Printing and stationery 3781 5080 Professional charges 4602 6224 Insurance 142 173 Rates and taxes 63 310 Bank charges 1420 1469 Payment to auditors - Statutory audit fee 1488 1170 - Other certifications 100 100 - Out of pocket expenses 79 108 Exchange differences net - 555 Miscellaneous expenses 1145 210 78314 89073 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA

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77 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA OXFAM INDIA Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 March 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated For the year ended 31 March 2018 For the year ended 31 March 2017 NOTE 19: Capitalised assets purchased Capital assets purchased 6987 4647 6987 4647 NOTE 20: Prior period expense Professional charges 96 378 96 378 Note 21: Post-employment benefit plan Statement of Income and expenditure For the year ended 31 March 2018 For the year ended 31 March 2017 Current service cost 2018 2125 Interest cost on benefit obligation 632 661 Net actuarial gain/loss recognised in the year 401 424 Expected return on plan assets 1065 761 Net expense 1986 1601 Balance Sheet For the year ended 31 March 2018 For the year ended 31 March 2017 Benefit asset/ liability: 9893 8377 Fair value of plan assets 12460 12908 Plan asset 2567 4531 Changes in the present value of the defined benefit obligation are as follows: 8377 8257 2018 2125 632 661 1038 2254 96 412 9893 8377 OXFAM INDIA Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 March 2018 Note 21: Post - employment benefit plan continued For the year ended 31 March 2018 For the year ended 31 March 2017 12908 9515 1065 761 105 2619 1120 - 498 13 12460 12908 Investments with insurer 100 100 As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 As at 31 March 2016 As at 31 March 2015 As at 31 March 2014 Defined benefit obligation 9893 8377 8257 7507 5828 Plan assets 12460 12908 9515 6817 5958 Surplus/ deficit 2567 4531 1258 690 130 Experience adjustments on plan liabilities 33 543 738 73 433 Experience adjustments on plan assets 498 13 17 131 103 As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 7.71 7.54 7.00 7.00 7.51 8.25 20.00 20.00 60 Years 60 Years Note 22: Operating leases As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 Within one year 1233 1009 After one year but not more than five years 1788 85 3021 1094 Retirement age The overall expected rate of return on assets is determined based on the market prices prevailing on that date applicable to the period over which the obligation is to be settled. The Company has taken various properties under cancellable and non-cancellable rental agreements. These agreement ranges from 5 months to 5 years. There are no contingent rentals payable. There are no restrictions imposed by these arrangements. There are no subleases. The rental payments recognised in the Statement of income and expenditure for the year ended 31 March 2018 was Rs. 24915 31 March 2017 Rs. 25510. Future minimum rentals payable under non-cancellable operating leases are as follows: The estimates of future salary increases considered in actuarial valuation take account of inflation seniority promotion and other relevant factors. Attrition rate Discount rate Salary escalation rate Expected return on plan assets The principal assumptions used in determining gratuity obligations for the Company’s plan are as follows: Expected return Actuarial gains/losses Closing fair value of plan assets The major categories of plan assets as a percentage of the fair value of total plan assets are as follows: Experience adjustments for the current and previous four years are as follows: Benefits paid Contributions by employer Present value of defined benefit obligation The following table summarize the components of net benefit expense recognized in the statement of income and expenditure and the funded status and amounts recognized in the balance sheet for the plan. Net employee benefit expense : Actuarial gains/ losses on obligation The Company operates a defined benefit group gratuity scheme under a trust "Oxfam India employees group gratuity assurance trust" managed by the trustees of the scheme for its employees and approved by Income Tax Act 1961. Under the scheme employees who have completed 3 years of service gets a gratuity on departure 15 days salary for each completed year of service however with effect from 1 February 2016 the minimum service period has been revised to 5 years for all the new joinees. The scheme is funded with an insurance company in the form of qualifying insurance policy. Note 29: During the year the Company has distributed relief materials aggregating Rs. 1.53 Opening fair value of plan assets Opening defined benefit obligation Current service cost Interest cost Benefits paid Changes in the fair value of the plan assets are as follows: Closing defined benefit obligation

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78 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA OXFAM INDIA Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 March 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated For the year ended 31 March 2018 For the year ended 31 March 2017 NOTE 19: Capitalised assets purchased Capital assets purchased 6987 4647 6987 4647 NOTE 20: Prior period expense Professional charges 96 378 96 378 Note 21: Post-employment benefit plan Statement of Income and expenditure For the year ended 31 March 2018 For the year ended 31 March 2017 Current service cost 2018 2125 Interest cost on benefit obligation 632 661 Net actuarial gain/loss recognised in the year 401 424 Expected return on plan assets 1065 761 Net expense 1986 1601 Balance Sheet For the year ended 31 March 2018 For the year ended 31 March 2017 Benefit asset/ liability: 9893 8377 Fair value of plan assets 12460 12908 Plan asset 2567 4531 Changes in the present value of the defined benefit obligation are as follows: 8377 8257 2018 2125 632 661 1038 2254 96 412 9893 8377 OXFAM INDIA Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 March 2018 Note 21: Post - employment benefit plan continued For the year ended 31 March 2018 For the year ended 31 March 2017 12908 9515 1065 761 105 2619 1120 - 498 13 12460 12908 Investments with insurer 100 100 As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 As at 31 March 2016 As at 31 March 2015 As at 31 March 2014 Defined benefit obligation 9893 8377 8257 7507 5828 Plan assets 12460 12908 9515 6817 5958 Surplus/ deficit 2567 4531 1258 690 130 Experience adjustments on plan liabilities 33 543 738 73 433 Experience adjustments on plan assets 498 13 17 131 103 As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 7.71 7.54 7.00 7.00 7.51 8.25 20.00 20.00 60 Years 60 Years Note 22: Operating leases As at 31 March 2018 As at 31 March 2017 Within one year 1233 1009 After one year but not more than five years 1788 85 3021 1094 Retirement age The overall expected rate of return on assets is determined based on the market prices prevailing on that date applicable to the period over which the obligation is to be settled. The Company has taken various properties under cancellable and non-cancellable rental agreements. These agreement ranges from 5 months to 5 years. There are no contingent rentals payable. There are no restrictions imposed by these arrangements. There are no subleases. The rental payments recognised in the Statement of income and expenditure for the year ended 31 March 2018 was Rs. 24915 31 March 2017 Rs. 25510. Future minimum rentals payable under non-cancellable operating leases are as follows: The estimates of future salary increases considered in actuarial valuation take account of inflation seniority promotion and other relevant factors. Attrition rate Discount rate Salary escalation rate Expected return on plan assets The principal assumptions used in determining gratuity obligations for the Company’s plan are as follows: Expected return Actuarial gains/losses Closing fair value of plan assets The major categories of plan assets as a percentage of the fair value of total plan assets are as follows: Experience adjustments for the current and previous four years are as follows: Benefits paid Contributions by employer Present value of defined benefit obligation The following table summarize the components of net benefit expense recognized in the statement of income and expenditure and the funded status and amounts recognized in the balance sheet for the plan. Net employee benefit expense : Actuarial gains/ losses on obligation The Company operates a defined benefit group gratuity scheme under a trust "Oxfam India employees group gratuity assurance trust" managed by the trustees of the scheme for its employees and approved by Income Tax Act 1961. Under the scheme employees who have completed 3 years of service gets a gratuity on departure 15 days salary for each completed year of service however with effect from 1 February 2016 the minimum service period has been revised to 5 years for all the new joinees. The scheme is funded with an insurance company in the form of qualifying insurance policy. Note 29: During the year the Company has distributed relief materials aggregating Rs. 1.53 Opening fair value of plan assets Opening defined benefit obligation Current service cost Interest cost Benefits paid Changes in the fair value of the plan assets are as follows:

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79 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA OXFAM INDIA Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 March 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated Key management personnel Ms. Nisha Agrawal Chief Executive Officer B Related party transactions during the year: Particulars For the year ended 31 March 2018 For the year ended 31 March 2017 Remuneration to key management personnel Ms. Nisha Agrawal Chief Executive Officer 5398 4653 B Outstanding balances in respect of related party transactions as at year end: Particulars For the year ended 31 March 2018 For the year ended 31 March 2017 Payable towards expenses incurred by key management personnel Ms. Nisha Agrawal Chief Executive Officer - 186 Particulars For the year ended 31 March 2018 For the year ended 31 March 2017 Grants from affiliates 312217 227970 In-house fundraising: -Donation - corporate and institutions 41048 22631 -Donation - individuals 3400 763 -Donation - events 6910 734 363575 252098 Particulars For the year ended 31 March 2018 For the year ended 31 March 2017 Consultancy cost 62 65 Staff international travel 1888 2294 Programme Workshop 306 613 Others 426 - 2682 2972 Corpus fund During the year the Company has organized two Trailwalker events in India near Bengaluru and Mumbai. 148 teams participated in Mumbai trailwalker 87 in 100km event and 61 teams in 50kms event - 31 March 2017: 99 teams in 100kms and 42teams in 50kms and 339 teams participated in Bengaluru trailwalker 244 in 100km event and 95 in 50km event - 31 March 2017: 178 teams in 100kms and 53 teams in 50kms from India and abroad participated in the Trailwalker in India and the Company has raised Rs. 56782 31 March 2017 Rs. 47530 through this event. The funds raised through Trailwalker will support programmes on education health livelihood women empowerment and Even It Up Campaign on Inequality. The Company incurred expenditure amounted to Rs. 40193 31 March 2017 Rs. 32617 on this event. Out of this total expenditure Rs. Nil 31 March 2017 Rs. Nil pertains to various capital expenditure incurred in relation to the event during the year. Note 27: Board deisgnated funds During the year ended 31 March 2018 and 31 March 2017 there is no movement in Corpus Fund. Note 23: Related party transactions A Related parties with whom transactions have taken place during the year: Note: The remuneration to the key managerial personnel does not include the provisions made for gratuity and leave benefits as they are determined on an actuarial basis for the Company as a whole. Note 26: Trailwalker event of Oxfam India Note 24: Earnings in foreign currency Note 25: Expenditure in foreign Currency

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80 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA OXFAM INDIA Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 March 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated Note 28: Grant paid to Partners - Geographical and Thematical presentation For the year ended 31 March 2018: Geography / Theme Humanitarian Response DRR Economic Justice Emerging Theme Essential Services Gender Justice Social Inclusion Grand Total Focus States -Assam 13781 - - - - - 13781 -Bihar 4001 5609 - 4152 4266 - 18028 -Chattisgarh - 2970 - 3033 3604 - 9607 -Jharkhand - 3870 - 2150 6193 - 12213 -National - - - 595 - 9091 9686 -Odisha 6053 3916 - 4771 5368 - 20108 -Uttar Pradesh 7257 1316 - 3697 4578 - 16848 31092 17681 - 18398 24009 9091 100271 Non Focus States 4086 579 2812 7505 2402 - 17384 Grand Total 35178 18260 2812 25903 26411 9091 117655 Geography / Theme Humanitarian Response DRR Economic Justice Emerging Theme Essential Services Gender Justice Social Inclusion Grand Total Focus States -Assam 16896 - - - - - 16896 -Bihar 5087 6286 - 3928 2541 - 17842 -Chattisgarh - 4020 - 3000 1999 - 9019 -Jharkhand - 3809 - 2000 4058 - 9867 -National - - - - - 8123 8123 -Odisha 2610 6226 - 5871 4469 - 19176 -Uttar Pradesh 3778 4463 1048 4301 3819 - 17409 28371 24804 1048 19100 16886 8123 98332 Non Focus States 6833 7842 - 7288 2000 - 23963 Grand Total 35204 32646 1048 26388 18886 8123 122295 Particulars SBNs Other denomination Total 109 12 121 Transactions between 9th November 2016 to 30th December 2016 - 303 303 22 265 287 49 397 446 82 - 82 - 183 183 As per our report of even date For B S R Associates LLP Chartered Accountants Firm Registration No.: 116231W/ W-100024 Kiran Karnik Mridula Bajaj Director Director Sandeep Batra DIN: 00542951 DIN: 02029817 Partner Membership No.: 093320 Place: Gurugram Date : 08 September 2018 Amitabh Behar Satya Prakash Mishra Chief Executive Officer Director Operations Place: New Delhi Place: New Delhi Date : 08 September 2018 Date : 08 September 2018 For and on behalf of the Board of Directors of Oxfam India The Company works in partnership with grassroot level NGOs to address the root causes of absolute poverty and injustice focusing on five themes spread into seven focused states. Geographical and thematical summary of Grant paid to partners extracted from managements internal reportings is as follows For the year ended 31 March 2017: Note 32: Previous year figures have been regrouped / reclassified where necessary to conform to current year’s classification. Note 30: During the current year expenditure includes Rs. 2.85 crores Previous Year Rs. 1.54 crores the corresponding income of which was booked in earlier years. Note 29: During the year the Company has distributed relief materials aggregating Rs. 1.53 crores Previous Year NIL received in kind from various parties. In accordance with the consistent policy followed the company has accounted for these donations in kind at NIL value. Less: Deposited in bank accounts Closing cash in hand as on December 30 2016 For the purposes of this clause the term Specified Bank Notes shall have the same meaning provided in the notification of the Government of India in the Ministry of Finance Department of Economic Affairs number S.O. 3407E dated November 8 2016. Note 31: The disclosures regarding details of specified bank notes held and transacted during 8 November 2016 to 30 December 2016 has not been made since the requirement does not pertain to financial year ended 31 March 2018. Corresponding amounts as appearing in the audited financial statements for the period ended 31 March 2017 have been disclosed here below: Closing cash in hand as on November 8 2016 Add: Withdrawal from bank accounts Add: Receipts for permitted transactions Less: Paid for permitted transactions

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81 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 OXFAM INDIA Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 March 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated Note 28: Grant paid to Partners - Geographical and Thematical presentation For the year ended 31 March 2018: Geography / Theme Humanitarian Response DRR Economic Justice Emerging Theme Essential Services Gender Justice Social Inclusion Grand Total Focus States -Assam 13781 - - - - - 13781 -Bihar 4001 5609 - 4152 4266 - 18028 -Chattisgarh - 2970 - 3033 3604 - 9607 -Jharkhand - 3870 - 2150 6193 - 12213 -National - - - 595 - 9091 9686 -Odisha 6053 3916 - 4771 5368 - 20108 -Uttar Pradesh 7257 1316 - 3697 4578 - 16848 31092 17681 - 18398 24009 9091 100271 Non Focus States 4086 579 2812 7505 2402 - 17384 Grand Total 35178 18260 2812 25903 26411 9091 117655 Geography / Theme Humanitarian Response DRR Economic Justice Emerging Theme Essential Services Gender Justice Social Inclusion Grand Total Focus States -Assam 16896 - - - - - 16896 -Bihar 5087 6286 - 3928 2541 - 17842 -Chattisgarh - 4020 - 3000 1999 - 9019 -Jharkhand - 3809 - 2000 4058 - 9867 -National - - - - - 8123 8123 -Odisha 2610 6226 - 5871 4469 - 19176 -Uttar Pradesh 3778 4463 1048 4301 3819 - 17409 28371 24804 1048 19100 16886 8123 98332 Non Focus States 6833 7842 - 7288 2000 - 23963 Grand Total 35204 32646 1048 26388 18886 8123 122295 Particulars SBNs Other denomination Total 109 12 121 Transactions between 9th November 2016 to 30th December 2016 - 303 303 22 265 287 49 397 446 82 - 82 - 183 183 As per our report of even date For B S R Associates LLP Chartered Accountants Firm Registration No.: 116231W/ W-100024 Kiran Karnik Mridula Bajaj Director Director Sandeep Batra DIN: 00542951 DIN: 02029817 Partner Membership No.: 093320 Place: Gurugram Date : 08 September 2018 Amitabh Behar Satya Prakash Mishra Chief Executive Officer Director Operations Place: New Delhi Place: New Delhi Date : 08 September 2018 Date : 08 September 2018 For and on behalf of the Board of Directors of Oxfam India The Company works in partnership with grassroot level NGOs to address the root causes of absolute poverty and injustice focusing on five themes spread into seven focused states. Geographical and thematical summary of Grant paid to partners extracted from managements internal reportings is as follows For the year ended 31 March 2017: Note 32: Previous year figures have been regrouped / reclassified where necessary to conform to current year’s classification. Note 30: During the current year expenditure includes Rs. 2.85 crores Previous Year Rs. 1.54 crores the corresponding income of which was booked in earlier years. Note 29: During the year the Company has distributed relief materials aggregating Rs. 1.53 crores Previous Year NIL received in kind from various parties. In accordance with the consistent policy followed the company has accounted for these donations in kind at NIL value. Less: Deposited in bank accounts Closing cash in hand as on December 30 2016 For the purposes of this clause the term Specified Bank Notes shall have the same meaning provided in the notification of the Government of India in the Ministry of Finance Department of Economic Affairs number S.O. 3407E dated November 8 2016. Note 31: The disclosures regarding details of specified bank notes held and transacted during 8 November 2016 to 30 December 2016 has not been made since the requirement does not pertain to financial year ended 31 March 2018. Corresponding amounts as appearing in the audited financial statements for the period ended 31 March 2017 have been disclosed here below: Closing cash in hand as on November 8 2016 Add: Withdrawal from bank accounts Add: Receipts for permitted transactions Less: Paid for permitted transactions NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 2018 All amounts in Rupees thousands unless otherwise stated OXFAM INDIA

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82 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 PARTNERS KHOJ AVAM JAN JAGRITI SAMITI SHIKSHASANDHAN LOKMITRA SAMARTH FOUNDATION REGIONAL CENTRE FOR DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION RCDC WOMEN’S ORGANISATION FOR SOCIO-CULTURAL AWARENESS WOSCA PALLISHREE SOCIETY FOR LEPROSY AMELIORATION AND REHABILITATION SOLAR UNNAYAN NATIONAL ALLIANCE OF WOMEN’S ORGANISATIONS NAWO INSTITUTE FOR SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT ISD INDIRA SOCIAL WELFARE ORGANISATION ISWO CENTER FOR CHILD AND WOMEN DEVELOPMENT CCWD ADHAR PARIVARTAN CENTER FOR YOUTH AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT CYSD PRASTUTEE YOUTH FOR SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT YSD PRAXIS COMMUTINY FOR YOUTH COLLECTIVE CYC VASUNDHARA COUNCIL FOR SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT CENTRE FOR SOCIAL EQUITY AND INCLUSION CSEI YOUTH FOR UNITY AND VOLUNTARY ACTION SAMPARC EMPOWERMENT FOR REHABILITATIONACADEMIC HEALTH EFRAH INDIAN COUNCIL FOR RESEARCH ON INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS ICRIER CENTRE FOR COMMUNICATIONS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES CCDS JOINT OPERATION FOR SOCIAL HELP JOSH SADBHAVNA TRUST SOCIETY FOR RURAL URBAN AND TRIBAL INITIATIVE SRUTI NATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR INDIA NFI TATA INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES TISS JAGORI RURAL CHARITABLE TRUST JRCT NORTH EAST RESEARCH AND SOCIAL WORK NETWORKING NERSWN

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83 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 PEOPLE’S ACTION FOR DEVELOPMENT PAD INTEGRATED RURAL MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION IRMA SOCIAL ACTION FOR APPROPRIATE TRANSFORMATION AND ADVANCEMENT IN RURAL AREAS ARA MORIGAON MAHILA MEHFIL MMM NORTH-EAST AFFECTED AREA DEVELOPMENT SOCIETY MAHILA SEWA TRUST PEOPLE’S RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION PRDA SHOHRATGARH ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIETY SES INDRANARAYANPUR NAZRUL SMRITI SANGHA BLESS ASTITWA SAMAJIK GRAMEEN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES GDS POORVANCHAL GRAMIN VIKAS SANSTHAN PGVS HUMSAFAR SRI RAMANAND SARASWATI PUSTAKALAYA SRSP ASIAN INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT AIM ASSOCIATION FOR PROMOTION OF CREATIVE LEARNING APCL LIFE EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT SUPPORT LEADS NAYA SAWERA VIKAS KENDRA NSVK BADLAO FOUNDATION ADITHI INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION IDF NAV JAGRITI RAHAT SPARK LOK SWAR SAKHIREE MAHILA VIKAS SANSTHAN SEWA BHARAT SRIJAN MAHILA VIKAS MANCH SMVM BIHAR GRAM VIKAS PARISHAD BGVP CENTRE FOR HEALTH AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT CHARM CHAUPAL GRAMIN VIKAS PRASHIKSHAN AVAM SHOD SANSTHAN NIVEDITA FOUNDATION SHIKHAR YUVA MANCH PRERAK LOK ASTHA SEWA SANSTHAN LASS JAN SWASTHYA SAHYOG JSS

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84 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 ABBREVIATIONS BMGF Bill and Millinda Gates Foundation CCDS Centre for Communication and Development Studies CDMO Chief District Medical Officer CFC Cooperative Facilitation Centre CFR Community Forest Rights CFRLA Community Forest Rights Learning and Advocacy CGMSC Chhatisgarh Medicine Services Corporation CGSACS Chhatisgarh State AIDS Control Society CLO Community Led Organizations CMO Chief Minister Office CSO Civil Society Organizations CWD Children with Disability CWSN Children With Special Needs DMF District Mineral Foundation DP Delivery Point DPO District Project Officer DRDA District Rural Development Agency DRR Disaster Risk Reduction EFSVL Emergency Livelihood and Food Security ESG Environment Sustainability and Government FCRA Foreign Contribution Regulation Act FRA Forest Rights Act G20 Group of 20 GLP Ground Level Panel GoB Government of Bihar GoI Government of India GRC Gender Resource Center HR Human Resources HRD Human Resource Department HRVA Hazard Risk Vulnerability Assessment IATW India and The World ICDS Integrated Child Development Services ICRIER Indian Council for Research in Economic Relation IFR Individual Forest Rights IICA Indian Institute of Corporate Affairs IINRG Indian Institute of Natural Resin and Gums IRBF India Responsible Business Forum JSA Jan Swasthya Abhiyan JVAPS Jan Vikas Parishad evam Anusandhan Sansthan MAMI Mumbai Academy of Moving Image MDM Mid Day Meal MGNREGA Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act.

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85 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 MIS Member Information System MLE Multi Lingual Education MP Member of Parliament NCDHR National Campaign on Dalit Human Rights NCE National coalition on Education NDB New Development Bank NDP No Detention Policy NFI Non Food Items NTFP Non Timber based Forest Produce NYEF National Youth Equity Forum OFDI Oversease Foreign Direct Investment OHK Oxfam Hong Kong OIN Oxfam India OREDA Odisha Renewable Energy Development Agency PHC Public Health Centres POCSO Prevention of Child Against Sexual Offence PRI Panchayati Raj Institutions PS Private Sector PSE Private Sector Engagement PWDV Prevention of Women Against Domestic Violence RTE Right to Education RTI Right to Information SDG Sustainable Development Goals SDM Sub Divisional Magistrate SDP School Development Plan SEBI Stock Exchange Board of India SI Social Investment SMC School Management Committee SP Supritendant of Police SRI Sustainable and Responsible Investing TLWR Transformative leadership of Women’s Right TW Trail Walker UN United Nations VAWG Violence Against Women and Girls VDMC Village Disaster Management Committee VDMP Village Disaster Management Plan VHSNC Village Health Sanitation and Nutrition Committee VNMS Volunteer Network Management System WASH Water Sanitation and health WCD Women and Child Development WNTA Wada Na Todo Abhiyan

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86 THE BOTTOM LINE | ANNUAL REPORT 17-18 OxfamIndia OxfamIndia Oxfam_India Oxfam India 4Th 5Th Floor Shriram Bhartiya Kala Kendra Building 1 Copernicus Marg New Delhi - 110001 www.oxfamindia.org | +91 1146538000

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