Events Marking the 20th Anniversary of the U.S.’s Last Nuclear Test

Views:
 
     
 

Presentation Description

In 2012, the U.S. should have been celebrating 20 years since the nation's last nuclear test. Yet, in 2012, U.S. nuclear weapons scientists already conducted two 'Z Machine' tests on plutonium and plan for year's end an underground explosion of a plutonium-filled mockup warhead! Hiroshima peace groups protested these experiments with letters of protest and more. If their assertion that the U.S. is still conducting 'nuclear tests' has any merit, it might mean that the CTBT has to review what it is trying to ban.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

…the U.S. conducted two ‘nuclear tests’ in 2012, and another is on the way NuclearCrimes.org September 2012:

…the U.S. conducted two ‘nuclear tests’ in 2012, and another is on the way NuclearCrimes.org September 2012 20 years after its last nuclear explosion…

U.S. Nuclear Testing History:

U.S. Nuclear Testing History U.S. conducted world’s first nuclear test in New Mexico in July 1945 - its last nuclear explosion was in 1992 2012 was to be the ’20 th anniversary of the U.S.’s last nuclear test’ But since 1997, U.S. weapons scientists have been conducting subcritical experiments These experiments subject plutonium fuel to a ‘nuclear explosive’ environment. Although there’s no sustained ‘chain reaction,’ some consider these ‘nuclear tests.’

Z-Machine tests on plutonium:

Z-Machine tests on plutonium In September 2012, Hiroshima peace organizations found out U.S. conducted 2 subcritical ‘Z Machine’ tests earlier in year The ‘Z Machine’ mimics conditions of a nuclear explosion U.S. didn’t pre-announce experiments; ‘mentioned’ one of them via a chart

Hiroshima groups outraged about Z-Machine tests - calling them ‘nuclear tests’:

Hiroshima groups outraged about Z-Machine tests - calling them ‘nuclear tests’ Hiroshima peace groups immediately condemned ‘Z Machine’ plutonium experiments Hiroshima museum curator, who says these experiments are ‘nuclear tests,’ reset ‘Peace Clock’

Hiroshima Mayor Writes Letters of Protest:

Hiroshima Mayor Writes Letters of Protest ‘Though the test did not involve a nuclear explosion, [this] series of such experiments …can be understood as evidence that the U.S. intends to cling to its nuclear stockpile …[and] has aroused suspicion regarding your intentions…’

Anger at more than just ‘Z Machine’ tests:

Anger at more than just ‘Z Machine’ tests U.S. Z-Machine ‘shots’ and underground ‘subcritical nuclear experiments’ are considered ‘nuclear tests’ by Hiroshima groups ‘Subcritical nuclear experiments’ are conducted underground in Nevada

Subcritical tests soon to involve warheads:

Subcritical tests soon to involve warheads Normal U.S. underground subcritical tests bombard bits of plutonium with chemical explosives In 2011, it was learned U.S. had plans to carry out a ‘first-of-a-kind’ subcritical test It would be an underground explosion of a plutonium-filled mock-up warhead called a ‘scaled subcritical experiment’

‘Scaled’ subcritical test planned for end of 2012:

‘Scaled’ subcritical test planned for end of 2012 Experiment called ‘Pollux’ will occur sometime in the fall of 2012 With Pollux, the U.S. will have carried out three ‘nuclear tests’ in 2012

Are these experiments really ‘nuclear tests’?:

Are these experiments really ‘nuclear tests’? Each ‘stockpile’ experiment on plutonium results in a ‘nuclear energy release.’ In the 1990s, even President Clinton’s administration wasn’t clear if this was equated with the definition of a ‘nuclear explosion.’ The definition of ‘nuclear explosion’ is blurry even to the backers of the CTBT Guess what else…? FOIA documents indicate these ‘stockpile’ experiment methods could be exploited to make new nuclear weapons by the U.S…. or by ‘wannabe’ nuclear weapons states!

20 years after its last nuclear test, the U.S. is planning ‘stockpile stewardship’ experiments that are increasingly resembling nuclear tests. If we want to curb proliferation, we need to put language back into the CTBT (that was removed in the 1990s) that would ban nuclear tests of every definition!:

20 years after its last nuclear test, the U.S. is planning ‘stockpile stewardship’ experiments that are increasingly resembling nuclear tests . If we want to curb proliferation, we need to put language back into the CTBT (that was removed in the 1990s) that would ban nuclear tests of every definition ! Visit NuclearCrimes.org for more

authorStream Live Help