Change in Supply or Change in Quantity Supplied

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PowerPoint Presentation:

Supply Change in Supply or Change in Quantity Supplied ©2012, TESCCC Economics Unit 4, Lesson 1

Objectives:

Objectives Understand the difference between a ∆QS and ∆S. List the reason for a change in QS. Identify the non-price determinants of supply. Graph a ∆QS and ∆S. ©2012, TESCCC

Profit is what motivates producers.:

Profit is what motivates producers. ©2012, TESCCC

Change in QS:

Change in QS Caused by a change in the price of the item. This is shown by a movement along the curve. ©2012, TESCCC

PowerPoint Presentation:

P Q S 1 P 1 Q 1 P 2 Q 2 Change in QS ©2012, TESCCC

Change in Supply:

Change in Supply If something other than the price changes, we call that a change in supply. Our original supply curve is no longer valid, so we will shift the entire curve. There are several reasons for a change in supply. ©2012, TESCCC

PowerPoint Presentation:

S 1 $ Q S 2 S 2 $ Q S 1 Decrease in Supply - Shift Left Increase in Supply - Shift Right ©2012, TESCCC

Change in Supply:

Change in Supply Change in government regulations Change in producer expectations Change in taxes or subsidies Change in # of sellers Change in cost of inputs Change in technology Change in other goods’ price ©2012, TESCCC

1. Change in government regulations:

1. Change in government regulations Change in government regulations – This is when the government tells the producer they must do something. Example: Tells auto manufacturers they must have seat belts or air bags in all cars ©2012, TESCCC

2. Change in producer expectations:

2. Change in producer expectations 2. Change in producer expectations – This can be an expectation about price or some other factor that would influence the cost of production or the ability of the producer to produce the item. Example: If producers think the cost of one of their inputs may decrease in the future, they will wait to produce the item. ©2012, TESCCC

3. Change in taxes or subsidies :

3. Change in taxes or subsidies 3. Change in taxes – This would be an excise tax on production. Taxes on producers raise the cost of production and cut into a producers profit, so a new tax will decrease supply. Change in subsidies – A subsidy is when the government pays the producer some money. This, in essence, lowers the cost of production and will cause an increase in supply. ©2012, TESCCC

4. Change in cost of inputs:

4. Change in cost of inputs 4. Change is costs of inputs – An increase in the cost of an inputs will cause profit to decrease so producers will supply less or shift left; a decrease in the cost of an inputs means the producer will get more profit, and they will then increase supply or shift the curve right. ©2012, TESCCC

5. Change in technology :

5. Change in technology 5. Change in technology – New technology allows a producer to lower the cost of production and will always shift the supply curve to the right with an increase. ©2012, TESCCC

6. Change in other goods’ prices:

6. Change in other goods’ prices Change in prices of other goods- This is other goods that have the same productive process that a producer could produce. Example: If you are a farmer (producer) and you are producing wheat but you hear that the price of corn at market is going to be higher than wheat, you will stop producing wheat and start producing corn. ©2012, TESCCC

7. Change in # of sellers :

7. Change in # of sellers 7. Change in # of sellers – If more sellers or producers enter the market, supply will increase and shift right; if sellers leave the market for some reason, supply will decrease and shift left. ©2012, TESCCC

TIGGERS – This might help you remember these reasons.:

TIGGERS – This might help you remember these reasons. T- ∆ technology I- ∆ input costs G- ∆ government regulations G- ∆ other goods E- ∆ expectations R- ∆ taxes or subsidies S - ∆ # of sellers ©2012, TESCCC

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