day in the life - industrial - craig halls

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Day in the Life of an Athletic Trainer

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A Day in the Life of an Athletic Trainer…:

Industrial Setting A Day in the Life of an Athletic Trainer… © 2011 National Athletic Trainers Association www.nata.org

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© 2011 National Athletic Trainers’ Association www.nata.org (800)TRY-NATA Athletic trainers are a natural fit for working with workers in light industrial and other commercial locations. Their educational background, clinical experiences and knowledge of musculoskeletal injuries and illnesses make them ideal for controlling costs and increasing productivity. Industrial workers - sometimes referred to as industrial athletes - benefit from working with athletic trainers because the physical nature of their jobs—such as lifting, squatting and repetitive overhead motions—makes them susceptible to musculoskeletal injuries. As unique healthcare professionals specializing in the assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of such injuries, athletic trainers help keep workers healthy and on the job. This presentation will show you how one company has decreased the number of workplace injuries, decreased the number of sick days taken by employees and improved their bottom line by hiring an athletic trainer.

Essential Functions of an Industrial Athletic Trainer- EVAL & REHAB:

Essential Functions of an Industrial Athletic Trainer- EVAL & REHAB Provide orthopedic injury assessments covering such areas as (but not limited to): Patient history Observation Palpation Range of motion Manual muscle strength Reflex testing Myotomes Dermatomes Special tests Implement treatment plans that incorporate therapeutic exercise, modalities and work conditioning Develop written rehabilitation policies and procedures to be reviewed by the company medical director Perform comprehensive ergonomic job analyses including: Task analysis Risk factor identification and quantification Posture analysis Body mechanics analysis © 2011 National Athletic Trainers’ Association www.nata.org (800)TRY-NATA

Essential Functions of an Industrial Athletic Trainer- DATA ANALYSIS:

Essential Functions of an Industrial Athletic Trainer- DATA ANALYSIS In industry, athletic trainers need to demonstrate they are saving their employer money by being on staff. Some ways you prove your worth are by: Measuring the direct and indirect costs of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders Creating periodic reports showing: -Rehab utilization -Cost-savings -Cost avoidance Participating in the NORA Program -Collecting data to show how your work has contributed to the clients productive and speedy rehabilitation.

Essential Functions of an Industrial Athletic Trainer:

Essential Functions of an Industrial Athletic Trainer . Use innovation, creative solutions and employee empowerment to design and/or implement ergonomics interventions Administrative - completion of reports/forms including: - Patient files - Invoices - Monthly reports - Budgets - Expense reports - Outcomes tools

Physical & Mental Requirements:

Physical & Mental Requirements . Occasional lifting up to 30 lbs. is required to move/transfer supplies and equipment or to perform employee job tasks during ergonomic job analyses Alternating periods; frequent to constant standing and walking to perform job analyses and meet with employees and other client representatives as well as frequent to constant sitting for long periods of time to attend meetings and complete documentation as necessary

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. Frequent reaching, bending, stooping, squatting, kneeling and gripping to administer patient care and perform employee jobs tasks during ergonomic job analyses Occasional climbing required to access plant sites and job locations Must be able to perform near acuity, far acuity and accommodation to complete documentation, patient care and perform job analyses Physical & Mental Requirements

I am an Athletic Trainer Working in:

I am an Athletic Trainer Working in Name: Craig Halls, MBA, ATC, LAT, CEES Title: Wellness Site Manager Employer: Appleton Job location: Appleton, Wisconsin Today, Craig Halls works as a corporate athletic trainer at Aurora Healthcare– a career move he was able to make because of his experiences with Appleton. INDUSTRY NATA Note: As of October 2007, there were more than 260 NATA members working in the Occupational or Industrial setting.

A Day in the Life of an Industrial Athletic Trainer:

A Day in the Life of an Industrial Athletic Trainer MY ATHLETIC TRAINING EXPERIENCE LEVEL IS: BS in Human Kinesiology (UW-Milwaukee) MBA (Cardinal Stritch University) ATC LAT in Wisconsin Certified Ergonomic Evaluation Specialist (CEES) through Roy Matheson program

The Certified Ergonomic Evaluation Specialist (CEES)- Roy Matheson:

For more information visit : www.roymetheson.com/erc_certification.html or e-mail certification@roymatheson.com The Certified Ergonomic Evaluation Specialist (CEES)- Roy Matheson Four-day Ergonomic Evaluation Certification Program Earning the CEES recognizes a demonstrated competency in ergonomic evaluation Common credential in Fields of safety Allied health professions Human resources The certification reflects a grounding in the multi-disciplinary nature of ergonomic evaluation, its venues, issues and solutions. These demonstrated skills are based on knowledge of guidelines from OSHA NIOSH The revised ANSI protocol Published clinical literature

Appleton – An Overview :

Appleton – An Overview The Appleton Coated Paper Company was founded in 1907 The company produces carbonless, thermal, security and performance packaging products World's largest producer of carbonless paper and the only producer of the NCR PAPER* brand of carbonless paper North America's leading producers of thermal media Headquartered in Appleton, Wisconsin Manufacturing operations are located in Wisconsin, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and the United Kingdom

Appleton – Staff :

Appleton – Staff 3,300 people employed company-wide I am the only athletic trainer at my location responsible for the health and wellness of more than 1,200 employees at my plant NATA Note: This population ratio is very similar to an athletic trainer working in secondary schools.

As Wellness Site Manager …:

As Wellness Site Manager … Responsible for ensuring that all the employees stay healthy, physically active and injury free I manage the health and wellness programs for 1,200 employees in the Wisconsin location Predominantly older workforce Ages 40 – 65 Some younger college-aged workers 70% of the people I treat are production employees Other patients or clients I treat are: Spouses Corporate (office) workers Retirees

A Day in the Life of an Industrial Athletic Trainer:

A Day in the Life of an Industrial Athletic Trainer A typical schedule for my job is: Monday – Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. No on-call No weekends

A Day in the Life of a Industrial Athletic Trainer:

A Day in the Life of a Industrial Athletic Trainer Salary range: 38k- 48k Employee benefits include: Health, dental and eye insurance (no out of pocket) 3 weeks vacation 2 sick days per year 1 week personal leave 12% 401k contribution NATA Note: This average salary for an NATA member working in the Industrial/Occupational setting: Industrial/Occupational – Clinic $47,371 Industrial/Occupational – Ergonomics $43,714 Industrial/Occupational - Health/Wellness/Fitness $38,750 Industrial/Occupational - Other Capacity $49,940

Daily Duties- Injury Prevention:

Daily Duties- Injury Prevention Ergonomics- high-level Utilize risk factor analysis tools (RULA, STRAIN Index, NIOSH lifting equation, etc.). Solutions/interventions (administrative and engineering controls). Modify equipment or job tasks and work with employees on better lifting techniques. Pre shift exercise. Physical Readiness/Conditioning Health and Wellness Assessment and Treatment © 2011 National Athletic Trainers’ Association www.nata.org (800)TRY-NATA

Daily Duties- Injury Management:

Daily Duties- Injury Management On-site Physical Rehabilitation Under the direction of the corporate medical director, I provide on-site rehab, such as modalities and therapeutic exercise Case Management Working closely with the on-site occupational health nurse, we assisted employees with medical care and advice, especially in “difficult” cases Return to Work Using the same principles of returning an athlete to a sport, I helped injured employees with conditioning programs to ensure a safe and injury-free return to regular work duties © 2011 National Athletic Trainers’ Association www.nata.org (800)TRY-NATA

BREAK DOWN OF THE DAY:

BREAK DOWN OF THE DAY Treat 8-12 patients per day, usually 3-4 right away in the morning, and the rest mixed in throughout the day based on THEIR work schedule One hour a day in meetings, providing presentations to employees or management; or else general meetings with safety director, HR manager, occupational health nurse, etc. Three hours per day on injury prevention programs. These include performing ergonomic analysis, meeting with production supervisors to address concerns, developing solutions with engineers, or explaining changes and/or train employees on new and improved processes or equipment One or two hours per day walking the production floor to meet with employees as an early intervention program, building rapport, hearing their concerns and discussing potential improvements/changes to their daily work duties One hour a day answering e-mails, telephone calls, etc

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Survey highlights: 100 percent of companies report that an athletic trainer provides a positive return on investment (ROI) Of companies that track ROI 30 percent indicate the ROI is at least $7 83 percent indicate the ROI is more than $3 94 percent of companies indicate the severity of injuries has decreased by at least 25 percent Almost two-thirds of the companies indicate that an athletic trainer has helped to decrease restricted workdays and workers’ compensation claims for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) by more than 25 percent 50 percent of companies report that the number of injuries has decreased by at least 50 percent Almost half of the companies that utilize athletic trainers to provide on-site physical rehab indicate that health care costs have decreased by more than 50 percent In 2003 I helped the NATA to conduct a survey that helped provide evidence that on-site occupational athletic training programs add value to the organizations where athletic trainers work. Read Craig’s ROI study at: http://www.nata.org/employers/hosp-clinic/deliver_ROI.htm © 2011 National Athletic Trainers’ Association www.nata.org (800)TRY-NATA

Appleton Testimonials::

Appleton Testimonials: "Our company has had an athletic trainer on-site since 2000, and since that time we have recognized the tremendous upside in the tangible and intangible benefits of this addition, including: Savings of more than $245,000 in just 2002 alone in health care-related expenditures. Decrease of 67% for health care costs related to the low back and 62% for costs to the upper extremity. Our days away from work have decreased by 60% in the last 3 years. In the industrial setting, these results can be best accomplished by an individual with the medical knowledge and training of an athletic trainer. We wouldn't have it any other way and will continue this program for the long term." - Dr. James E. Marotz, Corporate Medical Director at Appleton Papers; Appleton, WI. © 2011 National Athletic Trainers’ Association www.nata.org (800)TRY-NATA

Helpful Continuing Education::

Helpful Continuing Education: Ergonomic Certification Wellness or Health Promotion Certification Job Site Analysis Certification

The Issues and Opportunities Facing Industrial Athletic Trainers::

The Issues and Opportunities Facing Industrial Athletic Trainers: Issue: Justifying your existence both to management at your company as well as other health care providers. - Opportunities: Educating your employer and health care providers about the profession is always helpful. As well as, participating in programs which document and objectively measure statistics of an athletic trainer.

Why NATA members choose the Industrial Setting = Quality of Life:

Why NATA members choose the Industrial Setting = Quality of Life © 2011 National Athletic Trainers’ Association www.nata.org (800)TRY-NATA

Learn more at www.nata.org:

Learn more at www.nata.org Visit Career Development Resources on NATA Web site and find: - Videos - Brochures - PowerPoint Presentations - Studies - Marketing Materials - Advisors to assist with your specific questions *NATA members only section http://www.nata.org/members1/Career Development/index.cfm Visit Career Development Resources TODAY © 2011 National Athletic Trainers’ Association www.nata.org (800)TRY-NATA

STILL NEED MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ATHLETIC TRAINERS IN INDUSTRY? :

STILL NEED MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ATHLETIC TRAINERS IN INDUSTRY? Contact the NATA National Office Staff: Kathryn Ayres, PR and Marketing Coordinator KathrynA@nata.org | 800-879-6282 ext. 138 Write to Craig Halls, Aurora Healthcare: Craighalls2@hotmail.com

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Looking for a JOB? Want to hire an athletic trainer? www.nata.org/careercenter Visit the NATA Career Center today and find resources to help you find a job or hire an athletic trainer. © 2011 National Athletic Trainers’ Association www.nata.org (800)TRY-NATA