Synthesis #3 Practice

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Synthesis #3 Practice for Grade 12 Provincial Exam

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“Two Ways of Seeing a River”&“In the Trenches” : 

“Two Ways of Seeing a River”&“In the Trenches” Contrast the imagery in the stories.

Intro Paragraph #1 : 

Intro Paragraph #1 The imagery in “Two Ways of Seeing a river” by Mark twain, and “In the Trenches” by Charles Harrison is very elaborate. In both the short excerpt and the essay, the authors use great detail in describing the setting. However, they use imagery in different ways for contrasting results. Twain creates visual pictures in the reader’s mind, whereas Harrison displays the full spectrum of senses for the reader to imagine.

Intro Paragraph #1 : 

Intro Paragraph #1 The imagery in “Two Ways of Seeing a river” by Mark twain, and “In the Trenches” by Charles Harrison is very elaborate. In both the short excerpt and the essay, the authors use great detail in describing the setting. However, they use imagery in different ways for contrasting results. Twain creates visual pictures in the reader’s mind, whereas Harrison displays the full spectrum of senses for the reader to imagine. Texts introduced appropriately by title and author Specific thesis statement Minor errors (“twain” instead of “Twain”) Appropriate and specific vocabulary Medium/high score

Intro Paragraph #2 : 

Intro Paragraph #2 In both “Two Ways of Seeing a River” by mark twain, and “In the trenches” by Charles Yale Harrison imagery is used very effectively. In Twain’s writing the imagery is used very positively to create a pleasant mood, while in Harrison’s piece he uses imagery to almost scare the reader with the harsh details of reality. Imagery is used differently in these two pieces of writing.

Intro Paragraph #2 : 

Intro Paragraph #2 In both “Two Ways of Seeing a River” by mark twain, and “In the trenches” by Charles Yale Harrison imagery is used very effectively. In Twain’s writing the imagery is used very positively to create a pleasant mood, while in Harrison’s piece he uses imagery to almost scare the reader with the harsh details of reality. Imagery is used differently in these two pieces of writing. Texts introduced appropriately by title and author Minor errors, such as missing capitalization Thesis statement is vague Vocabulary is appropriate Logical but not insightful Medium score

Intro Paragraph #3 : 

Intro Paragraph #3 Both “Two Ways of Seeing a River” by Mark Twain, and the selection “In the Trenches” from the autobiographical novel, Generals Die in bed, by Charles Harrison, use a vast array of intricate imagery to capture the minds of their readers. In Mark Twain’s selection, imagery is used to create an elaborate, nostalgic image of a majestic river. In the excerpt from Generals Die in Bed, Charles Harrison uses sensory imagery to bring his readers into the world of gruesome, chaotic trench life. In both selections the imagery used is drastically different, yet both are able to capture the reader’s mind and send him tumbling into another world.

Intro Paragraph #3 : 

Intro Paragraph #3 Both “Two Ways of Seeing a River” by Mark Twain, and the selection “In the Trenches” from the autobiographical novel, Generals Die in bed, by Charles Harrison, use a vast array of intricate imagery to capture the minds of their readers. In Mark Twain’s selection, imagery is used to create an elaborate, nostalgic image of a majestic river. In the excerpt from Generals Die in Bed, Charles Harrison uses sensory imagery to bring his readers into the world of gruesome, chaotic trench life. In both selections the imagery used is drastically different, yet both are able to capture the reader’s mind and send him tumbling into another world. Texts introduced appropriately by title and author (although lengthy) Sophisticated vocabulary and sentence structure Thesis statement is specific and well-worded Prethinking evident High score

Types of Imagery : 

Types of Imagery

Moods Evoked by Imagery : 

Moods Evoked by Imagery

Purpose of Imagery : 

Purpose of Imagery

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