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Curriculum Design for Educational and Industrial Leaders:

Curriculum Design for Educational and Industrial Leaders Module 1 Essential of Designing a High-Tech Curriculum to Generate, Obtain, Manipulate, Display Information and Facilitate Learning from an Institutional, Organization and Management Perspective.

Integration of technology Challenges teachers to strive to new level of excellence with technol0gy:

Integration of technology Challenges teachers to strive to new level of excellence with technol0gy Utilization of technology to organize information is good, but using technology to analyze information, compare and contrast is better. Utilization of spreadsheets to manage data and information is great, but a better use is to show students how to make inferences and predictions, or to develop new ideas. Utilization of technology can be instrumental in developing higher-order thinking skills. Technology integration is a viable option to build a bridge to capitalize on the theoretical, process and practical aspects of curriculum design.

There may be a hint in this video as to why Teachers might be concern with textbook memorization (click on White to continue to next Slide):

There may be a hint in this video as to why Teachers might be concern with textbook memorization (click on White to continue to next Slide)

The term “Curriculum” has it ORIGIN in Rome? :

The term “Curriculum” has it ORIGIN in Rome? Curriculum design, draws on behavioral science theory organizational and institutional analysis and management theory to articulate to develop viable operating principles that facilitate instruction and guide the decision-making for educational leaders. Curriculum design can be prescriptive, descriptive or a combination of both. The Guiding Principle of effective curriculum design. The developer proposes – The teacher disposes.

Working definition of Curriculum:

Working definition of Curriculum

Four approaches to Curriculum Design that recognize both Theory and Practice.:

Four approaches to Curriculum Design that recognize both Theory and Practice . Curriculum as a body of knowledge to be transmitted. Curriculum as an attempt to achieve certain ends in students - product. Curriculum as process. Curriculum as praxis. Kelly, A. V. (1999) The Curriculum. Theory and practice 4e, London: Paul Chapman.

Role of the syllabus in a Theoretical, Process and Product Paradigm :

Role of the syllabus in a Theoretical, Process and Product Paradigm A syllabus will not generally indicate the relative importance of its topics. An approach to curriculum theory and practice which focuses on syllabus is only really concerned with content. A syllabus tends to follow the traditional textbook approach . The focus is really on content. Education in this sense, is the process by which knowledge content and subject are transmitted or 'delivered' to students with the teacher serving as the active dispenser of knowledge and the students as the primary recipient of content.

Critical Thoughts to Consider in designing curriculum (Process and Product):

Critical Thoughts to Consider in designing curriculum (Process and Product) A number of curriculum designs have attempted to make the student experience 'teacher proof'. Too often curriculum design is reduced to a technical exercise - objectives are set, a plan drawn up, then applied, and the outcomes (products) measured. The problem here is that such curriculum designs inevitably exist prior to and too often generated externally by state mandates. The success or failure of both the curriculum and the individual learners is judged on the basis of whether pre-specified changes occur in the behavior and person of the learner (the meeting of behavioral objectives). There are Issues of accountability that are closely associated with the measurement of objectives.

Pedagogical Praxis (Extension of Process):

Pedagogical Praxis (Extension of Process) Pedagogical praxis begins with the premise that under the right conditions, computers and other information technologies can make it easier for students to become active participants in meaningful projects and practices. Technology builds a bridge that allows young people to participate in the learning practices of professionals(Authentic Learning); that organize the skills, habits, and understandings they need to thrive in a complex, postindustrial society . College Record Volume 106 Number 7, 2004, p. 1401-1421

Definitions commonly Used in Curriculum Development :

Definitions commonly Used in Curriculum Development Benchmark is a specific expectation of learning at determined intervals. Content and Context Alignment refers to two aspects of alignment between the test and the curriculum. Content alignment means that the test content and the curriculum content are the same. Context alignment refers to alignment between the testing protocol and the context in which the curriculum is presented. Coordination of Curriculum assures consistency of curriculum from classroom to classroom . The curriculum has horizontal or lateral focus and connectivity. Objective is measurable knowledge necessary for students to become proficient in the benchmark or standard. Standard refers to broad, general expectations of what students should know and be able to do.

Model of horizontal or lateral focus and connectivity.:

Model of horizontal or lateral focus and connectivity.

Successful Curriculum Design as multidimensional Leadership:

Successful Curriculum Design as multidimensional Leadership Curriculum design is purposeful. Curriculum design is deliberate. Curriculum design is creative. Curriculum design is connecting the learning to the big picture. Curriculum design is an inclusive set of intentionally aligned components—clear learning outcomes with matching assessments, engaging learning experiences, and instructional strategies—organized into sequenced units of study that operate on many levels. You are the agent of change and opportunity

Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does.:

Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does. "Teachers are expected to reach unattainable goals with inadequate tools. The miracle is that at times they accomplish this impossible task." William James Hiam Ginott

Decisive Element in the Classroom:

Decisive Element in the Classroom Remember the Teacher who is the Decision-Maker in the Classroom Mandate for Curriculum Design

Why integrate Technology into a Curriculum Design?:

Why integrate Technology into a Curriculum Design? Technology is ubiquitous, touching almost every part of our lives Integrating technology into classroom instruction means more than teaching basic computer skills and software programs in a separate computer class. Effective tech integration must happen across the curriculum in ways that research shows deepen and enhance the learning process. Technology has the potential to support four key components of learning: active engagement, participation in groups, frequent interaction and feedback, and connection to real-world experts. When technology is effectively integrated into subject areas, teachers grow into roles of adviser, content expert, and coach.

Seven Steps to Curriculum development:

Seven Steps to Curriculum development Step 1 : Diagnosis of need Step 2 : Formulation of objectives Step 3 : Selection of content Step 4 : Organization of content Step 5 : Selection of learning experiences Step 6 : Organization of learning experiences Step 7 : Determination of what to evaluate and of the ways and means of doing it. ( Taba 1962)

Preparatory Assessment of the current Status of practices, curriculum and achievement:

Preparatory Assessment of the current Status of practices, curriculum and achievement Consideration of existing curricula and educational practices values that are shared by a relatively large group of people within the school or corporate community. Consideration of school’s history of reaction and decision-making relative to data gleaned from standardized and high stakes Consideration of the historical roles played by all members of school community in the decision-making process of developing a curriculum design. Consideration of the commitment of all members of the school community to maximize opportunities for successful student learning.

Where to begin in Planning a High-tech curriculum?:

Where to begin in Planning a High-tech curriculum? Where are you now? Consideration of the “big picture” recognizing practices that are already in place?

Cognitive domain-Learning Outcomes related to Knowledge:

Cognitive domain-Learning Outcomes related to Knowledge

Psychomotor Domain Learning Outcomes Related To Skills:

Psychomotor Domain Learning Outcomes Related To Skills

Affective Domain Learning Outcomes Related To Attitudes, Behaviors, and Values:

Affective Domain Learning Outcomes Related To Attitudes, Behaviors, and Values

Curriculum Revision Request Form “The person who says something is impossible should not interrupt the person who is doing it.” –- Chinese proverb :

Curriculum Revision Request Form “The person who says something is impossible should not interrupt the person who is doing it.” –- Chinese proverb “Technology is just a tool. In terms of getting the kids working together and motivating them, the teacher is the most important.” –Bill Gates

The Process and Product of curriculum development:

The Process and Product of curriculum development Module 3

History of Curriculum in America Part IV - Kimberly Greene :

History of Curriculum in America Part IV - Kimberly Greene

three curriculum Models – Three different Paradigms :

three curriculum Models – Three different Paradigms Tyler’s Curriculum Development Model Taba’s Curriculum Development Model Saylor and Alexander Model

Tyler’s Curriculum Development Model:

Tyler’s Curriculum Development Model

A Sample of What tyler means by Philosophy as expressed in common core state standards initiative:

A Sample of What tyler means by Philosophy as expressed in common core state standards initiative Mission Statement The Common Core State Standards provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them. The standards are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers. With American students fully prepared for the future, our communities will be best positioned to compete successfully in the global economy.

Objectives as Presented in the Common Core State initiative Standards of Mathematical Practices:

Objectives as Presented in the Common Core State initiative Standards of Mathematical Practices 1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. 4. Model with mathematics. 5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 6. Attend to precision. 7. Look for and make use of structure. 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning .

Phil0sophical & Psychological Screens for creating sound Instructional Objectives:

Phil0sophical & Psychological Screens for creating sound Instructional Objectives After identifying the objectives (which are the desired learning outcomes), the curriculum developer has to pass them through two screens: the philosophy screen and the psychology screen. Resulting from this are specific instructional objectives which state the kind of outcomes that are observable are measurable.

Writing Instructional Objectives:

Writing Instructional Objectives An objective is a description of a performance you want learners to be able to exhibit before you consider them competent. An objective describes an intended result of instruction, rather than the process of instruction itself ( Mager , p. 5). Basic Rules for Writing Instructional Objectives A good objective communicates your intent well and leaves little room for interpretation. There are three characteristics that help communicate intent when writing an objective: Performance, Conditions, and Criterion. A B C D s of Writing Objectives A-Audience: The who. "The student will be able to…“ B-Behavior: What a learner is expected to be able to do or the product or result of the doing. The behavior or product should be observable. C-Condition: The important conditions under which the performance is to occur. D-Degree: The criterion of acceptable performance. How well the learner must perform in order for the performance to be considered acceptable. ( Mager , R. F. (1984). Preparing Instructional Objectives (2nd edition). Lake Publishing Company: Belmont, California)

Sequence of learning experience:

Sequence of learning experience Tyler followed the objective with the organization and sequencing of these learning experiences. He emphasised that the experiences should be properly organised so as to enhance learning and suggested that ideas, concept, values and skills be used as organizing elements woven into the curriculum. These elements would serve as organizers linking content within a particular subject (e.g. history, economics, science) and also determine the method of instruction or delivery of content.

Evaluation :

Evaluation Tyler proposed that evaluation should be an important part of the curriculum development process. Tyler noted that it was necessary for educators to know whether the selected learning experiences produced the intended results.

Primary Strengths of Tyler’s Model:

Primary Strengths of Tyler’s Model Clearly Stated Objectives Active Participation of Learners Simple Linear Approach to Development of Behavior or Learning Objectives

Criticism of Tyler’s Model:

Criticism of Tyler’s Model Narrowly Interpreted Objectives Curriculum Restricted to a Narrow Range of Student Skills and Knowledge Critical Thinking, Problem Solving and Value Acquiring Processes Cannot be Plainly Declared in a Behavior Objective

Taba Model:

Taba Model

Taba Provides a Grass roots model for curriculum design emphasizing the Role of Teachers:

Taba Provides a Grass roots model for curriculum design emphasizing the Role of Teachers Diagnosis of need : The teacher who is also the curriculum designer starts the process by identifying the needs of students for whom the curriculum is planned. Formulation of objectives : After the teacher has identified needs that require attention, he or she specifies objectives to be accomplished. Selection of content: The objectives selected or created suggest the subject matter or content of the curriculum. Organization of content: A teacher cannot just select content, but must organize it in some type of sequence, taking into consideration the maturity of learners, their academic achievement, and their interests. Selection of learning experiences : Content must be presented to students and students must be engaged with the content. Organization of learning activities: Just as content must be sequenced and organised, so must the learning activities. Evaluation and means of evaluation: The curriculum planner must determine just what objectives have been accomplished. Evaluation procedures need to be designed to evaluate learning outcomes.

Essence of Taba Model:

Essence of Taba Model

The Administative Approach: Saylor, alexander and Lewis:

The Administative Approach: Saylor, alexander and Lewis Lunenburg, F. C. (2011). Curriculum Development:Deductive Models. SCHOOLING VOLUME 2, NUMBER 1, , 6. adapted from by Saylor, J. G., Alexander, W. M., & Lewis, A. J. (1981). Curriculum planning for better teaching and learning (4th ed.). New York, NY: Holt, Rinehart, & Winston.

Administative design in brief:

Administative design in brief Curriculum design involves decisions made by the responsible curriculum planning group(s). Saylor and his associates (1981) adopt an administrative approach to curriculum development. They describe and analyze curriculum plans in terms of the relations of ends and means, the attention to pertinent facts and data, and the flow of activities or procedures from beginning to end. CSCOPE is an example of Administrative Design . The design is usually developed by experts who are removed from the school setting

Curriculum evaluation involves the process of evaluating expected learning outcomes and the entire curriculum (High stakes Testing and benchmark testing) :

Curriculum evaluation involves the process of evaluating expected learning outcomes and the entire curriculum (High stakes Testing and benchmark testing) Saylor and his colleagues recognize both formative and summative evaluation. Formative procedures are the feedback arrangements that enable the curriculum planners to make adjustment and improvements at every stage of the curriculum development process: goals and objectives, curriculum development, and curriculum implementation. The summative evaluation comes at the end of the process and deals with the evaluation of the total curriculum plan. This evaluation becomes feedback for curriculum developers to use in deciding whether to continue, modify, or eliminate the curriculum plan with another student population. The provision for systematic feedback during each step in the curriculum system—and from students in each instructional situation—constitutes a major contribution to Saylor and associates administrative model of curriculum development.

Saylor’s Model Emphasizes control:

Saylor’s Model Emphasizes control Curriculum implementation involves decisions regarding instruction. Various teaching strategies are included in the curriculum plan so that teachers have options. Instruction is thus the implementation of the curriculum plan. There would be no reason for developing curriculum plans if there was no instruction. Curriculum plans, by their very nature, are efforts to guide and direct the nature and character of learning opportunities. All curriculum planning is worthless unless it influences the things that students do in school. Saylor argues that curriculum planners must see instruction and teaching as the summation of their efforts.

Evaluation is More than a Standardize test score:

Evaluation is More than a Standardize test score The model proposed that evaluation should be comprehensive using a variety of evaluation techniques Evaluation should involve the total educational program and the curriculum plan, the effectiveness of instruction, and the achievement of students

Practical Pragmatic Considerations Relevant to Curriculum design – Its more than a simple Definition or a Model:

Practical Pragmatic Considerations Relevant to Curriculum design – Its more than a simple Definition or a Model The Recommended Curriculum The Written Curriculum The Supported Curriculum The Tested Curriculum The Taught Curriculum The Learned Curriculum The Hidden Curriculum The Excluded Curriculum Thinking About Curriculum (ASCD) (http://www.slideshare.net/rirvan/thinking-about-curriculum-ascd)

New Jersey Core Content Standards - 2008:

New Jersey Core Content Standards - 2008

BreakPoint and Beyond George Land and Beth Jarman :

BreakPoint and Beyond George Land and Beth Jarman "Breakpoint and Beyond," describes a longitudinal study that Land conducted beginning in the late 1960s. It employed repeated administrations of eight tests of divergent thinking that had been used by NASA to measure the potential for creative work by its engineers and scientists. According to Guilford, divergent thinkers not only can quickly generate multiple approaches to solving a problem, but they are also able to simultaneously consider the utility of a variety of alternatives and, in the process, come up with truly original notions about how to solve a vexing problem. As you might suspect, an individual's divergent thinking test scores do not correlate with their IQ scores, as the tests measure distinctly different abilities. ( Source:Teaching at Tech: the Bigger Picture by William Kennedy )

What did Land and Jarman do?:

What did Land and Jarman do? In the Lamb study, 1,600 three-to five-year-old kids were given the divergent thinking test battery and 98 percent of those tested scored in the top tier; a level they called creative "genius." When the very same cohort of kids was tested five years later, only 32 percent scored in this top tier. After another five years, only 10 percent of the same kids scored in the top tier. By 1992, 200,000 adults had taken the same battery of tests and only 2 percent scored in the top tier. Why? What happened to the nearly universal mental flexibility and creativity of those preschoolers and kindergarteners in just a few short years? Should it be a problem for curriculum designers? ( Source:Teaching at Tech: the Bigger Picture by William Kennedy)

Points to Consider:

Points to Consider We know that our mental models--psychologists like to call them "schemas"--are profoundly shaped by our schooling experiences. The schemas we learn, in and out of school, facilitate problem solving and help us to quickly process the flood of information coming into our senses. The "goals-and-objectives" model of schooling strongly encourages students to adopt fixed mental models of how things work and endlessly requires them to demonstrate that they can apply these models in practice. We punish students who can't or won't master the approved set of mental models by labelling them as stupid or "not college material." Could it be that this protracted period of mastering other people's mental models--and the associated plug-and-chug that goes along with them--dulls an individual's ability to generate divergent notions on the fly? Could it be that letting these early gifts of divergent thinking and creative wonder lie fallow for so long actually puts our students at risk of being unable to adapt to the maelstrom of social and professional change that lies ahead of them?

Assignment Memo Email To: All Doctoral Students From: I. M. Incharge - Superintendent of Schools:

Assignment Memo Email To: All Doctoral Students From: I. M. Incharge - Superintendent of Schools To : Doctoral Candidates in Educational Technology From: I. M, Incharge , Superintendent As superintendent I have been asked to present a model lessons that reflects how technology can be integrated seemlessly in to a curriculum engagement. I know that you are familiar with the Tyler Model, the Taba Model and the Administrative Model of Saylor. In looking at C-Scope, I found curricula that are highly structured and indeed reflect the administrative model. The lessons are structured and time regulated leaving little room to address individual differences, learning .styles or diverse potential, talent and interests. C-Scope is professionly well crafted but even though they pays lip-service to teachers adaptation and modification, the fact that everyone at a given grade level has to proceed in a timely manner tends to limit the genuine pragmatic prospect to significantly modify the prescribed lesson. Nevertheless, you might consider the posted lessons as a point of departure. I think we might be able to develop our curriculum pursuant to the Common Core Initiatives in such a way that technology is seamlessly woven into the curriculum engagement. I need your help. As it now stand the Common Core Initiatives address two area: Mathematics and Language Arts. C-Scope addresses basically all the academic areas. Generally specific and detailed instructions are given as to how the teacher must present the lesson. I need you help to create a model lessons that infuse technology into a Core Content Initiative. The lesson can be blended with any academic discipline of you choosing or it can stand alone. In your lesson please address: Goal, Learning Objective, Rationale (Screening: Philosophical and Psychological), The Learning Engagement, Technology Needed, and Evaluation. I would also like you to prepare a PowerPoint presentation that capture the essence of the benefits derived from your lesson offering. The slide show should be no longer than 10 slides. Assume that you are the presenter and will address each slide at our administrative council. I anticipate using your presentation to illustrate the creative ways that technology can serve the students. Thank you in advance.

Curriculum Design and Technology:

Curriculum Design and Technology Module 4 Challenges of Leadership and ANOVA

Einstein’s wisdon can apply to curriculum development and leadership:

Einstein’s wisdon can apply to curriculum development and leadership

Challenge of Leadership Digital Media is Part of Our Youth’s Identity:

Challenge of Leadership Digital Media is Part of Our Youth’s Identity Our visions and ideas about what school need to change- It isn’t about integrating technology anymore. Students are saturated with media all day long. The 21 st Century is over 10 years old. Parker, J, K. (2010) Understanding Youth and Digital Media

Ten Trends Affecting the Field of Instructional Design and Technology - Dr. Robert Reiser:

Ten Trends Affecting the Field of Instructional Design and Technology - Dr. Robert Reiser   Performance Improvement Constructivism Knowledge Management Performance Support Online Learning Social Media Educational Games Learning Sciences Mobile Learning

Leadership to Blend Digital Media and curriculum:

Leadership to Blend Digital Media and curriculum

QUALITIES OF VIBRANT LEADERSHIP:

QUALITIES OF VIBRANT LEADERSHIP

Challenges for Curriculum Design Leaders:

Challenges for Curriculum Design Leaders

Robert Reiser, Ph.D is the Associate Dean for Research, Distinguished Teaching Professor and Robert M. Morgan Professor of Instructional Systems College of Education Florida State University:

Robert Reiser , Ph.D is the Associate Dean for Research, Distinguished Teaching Professor and Robert M. Morgan Professor of Instructional Systems College of Education Florida State University

Creating a Pedagogy of Possibilities – Leadership in action:

Creating a Pedagogy of Possibilities – Leadership in action Goal and Objectives are Identified and Screened in mind Utilization of Available Resources Including Technology Considered that Online Tasks Will Take Time Planned for Differentiate Instruction Provided a Variety of Engagements: Face-to-Face Interaction, Small Groups, Online Schedule, and Individual Problem Solving Work Opportunity Provided a Balance of Face-to-Face, Collaborative and Computer and Internet Time

What did you Hope to Achieve?:

What did you Hope to Achieve? Increase the Quality of the Learning Engagement Improve Learning Effectiveness Accommodate a Variety of Learning Styles Provide Scaffolding to Assist Learners at Various Steps in Leaning Process Increase Variety of Delivery through Learning Strategies

As the Leader you helped by…:

As the Leader you helped by… Implementing best practices related to technology use in the school program based on research and state/national standards Working with the principal and school leadership team to provide access to technology resources and services of the technology facilitator at point of need Working with teachers and technology staff in the selection of resources that are compatible with the school technology infrastructure Screencasting Video and Collaborative Software Computers, tablets and mobile devices Assisting with planning the design of the technology engagement so that information resources are continually available to facilitate blended learning Providing necessary in-service and/or peer-to-peer tutoring Adhering to and communicating copyright as well as other laws and guidelines pertaining to the distribution and ethical use of all resources Designing cooperatively the matrix of blended learning engagement evaluation

Leadership as a process :

Leadership as a process Module 7

Visionary Leadership A process More than a random moment of creativity:

Visionary Leadership A process More than a random moment of creativity The process of creating a compelling vision requires understanding the combined visions of all those who are stakeholders in the quest for excellence. It requires knowing who those people are. It requires listening to them, understanding what that preferred future looks like to them, and incorporating their interests. It requires synthesizing all those interests into a single direction which strikes the best balance between them. Compelling Vision Requires Prudent Foresight: - there is a need for it to be created; - there is a condition that does not currently exist; - there is potential to inspire and motivate people. Scott Neilson -Thoughts on Creating a Compelling Vision http://www.scottneilson.com/?p=19

Leaders as Models :

Leaders as Models “Leaders redefine people’s paradigms about what is possible” (Change Leadership Group at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, 2009) Leaders emphasize the theoretical framework to provide a comprehensive understanding of the landscape of learning and the ways in which learning shapes and is shaped by technology Leaders are professionally anchored recognizing the challenges set forth by the real world

Relational Curriculum Leaders:

Relational Curriculum Leaders perform cost-benefit assessments for technology interventions related to management and instruction, based on technology-related funding opportunities   design training programs for professional development apply criteria to plan, develop, implement, and assess curriculum in both academic and corporate settings.   examine a variety of pedagogical and administrative approaches that support the integration of technology into the curriculum, designed to meet the needs of all learners.   determine delivery modes that are most appropriate for different learning situations.   integrate academic and corporate standards in the curriculum development process.   design assessments that enhance student learning.   design prototypes for effective on-line learning communities.   analyze textual and graphical data from many sources, process it in a way that readers can understand, and generate comprehensive reports. As we look ahead into the next century, leaders will be those who empower others. - Bill Gates

Will RichArdson on Leadership and vision:

Will RichArdson on Leadership and vision

Leaders and Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation:

Leaders and Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation

Locus of causality - Benefit of developing Self actualized people:

Locus of causality - Benefit of developing Self actualized people

Leadership And Team Building Skills Mitchell Manning http://www.slideshare.net/FastFix/leadership-and-team-building :

Leadership And Team Building Skills Mitchell Manning http://www.slideshare.net/FastFix/leadership-and-team-building

Leadership And Team Building Skills Mitchell Manning http://www.slideshare.net/FastFix/leadership-and-team-building:

Leadership And Team Building Skills Mitchell Manning http://www.slideshare.net/FastFix/leadership-and-team-building

Leadership And Team Building Skills Mitchell Manning http://www.slideshare.net/FastFix/leadership-and-team-building :

Leadership And Team Building Skills Mitchell Manning http://www.slideshare.net/FastFix/leadership-and-team-building

Leadership And Team Building Skills Mitchell Manning http://www.slideshare.net/FastFix/leadership-and-team-building :

Leadership And Team Building Skills Mitchell Manning http://www.slideshare.net/FastFix/leadership-and-team-building

Leadership And Team Building Skills Mitchell Manning http://www.slideshare.net/FastFix/leadership-and-team-building :

Leadership And Team Building Skills Mitchell Manning http://www.slideshare.net/FastFix/leadership-and-team-building

Tom Peters - advice on the essential element of teambuilding :

Tom Peters - advice on the essential element of teambuilding

“Leadership is the art of leading others to deliberately create a result that wouldn’t have happened otherwise.” Dereck p:ankaew : What is “Leadership” and What Makes a Good Leader? http://www.siyli.org/what-is-leadership-what-makes-good-leader/:

“Leadership is the art of leading others to deliberately create a result that wouldn’t have happened otherwise.” Dereck p:ankaew : What is “Leadership” and What Makes a Good Leader? http://www.siyli.org/what-is-leadership-what-makes-good-leader/ Characteristics Self-Awareness. You have an intimate knowledge of your inner emotional state. You know your strengths and your weaknesses. You know when you’re working in flow and you know when you’re over worked. You know yourself, including your capabilities and your limitations, which allows you to push yourself to your maximum potential. Self-Direction. You’re able to direct yourself effectively and powerfully. You know how to get things done, how to organize tasks and how to avoid procrastination. You know how to generate energy for projects, to calm yourself when angered. You can make decisions quickly when necessary, but can also slow to consider all the options on the table.

“Leadership is the art of leading others to deliberately create a result that wouldn’t have happened otherwise.” Dereck p:ankaew What is “Leadership” and What Makes a Good Leader? http://www.siyli.org/what-is-leadership-what-makes-good-leader/:

“Leadership is the art of leading others to deliberately create a result that wouldn’t have happened otherwise.” Dereck p:ankaew What is “Leadership” and What Makes a Good Leader? http://www.siyli.org/what-is-leadership-what-makes-good-leader/ Characteristics Continued Vision. You’re working towards a goal that’s greater than yourself. It could be something small, like the success of the team, or a larger vision like world peace. Working towards a vision is far more inspiring than working towards personal gain. Ability to Motivate. Leaders don’t lead by telling people what they have to do. Instead, leaders cause people to want to help them. A key part of this is cultivating your own desire to help others. When others sense that you want to help them, they in turn want to help you. Social Awareness. Understanding social networks and key influencers in that social network is another key part of leadership. Who in the organization has the most clout, both officially and unofficially? Who moves the hearts of the group?

Leadership is an art Ken Robinson:

Leadership is an art Ken Robinson

Leadership Often requires grant writing skills to set the stage for innovation:

Leadership Often requires grant writing skills to set the stage for innovation A group or team needs a strategy It needs a framework to realize a vision A leader creates plans and sets them in motion A leader has high goals, strives to make the efforts of himself or herself and his or her followers contribute to the enrichment of the entire group Grant writing is an acquired skill

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