Rules Changes 1

Views:
 
Category: Entertainment
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? Racing Rules of Sailing 2009 - 2012 What’s new?

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? For PowerPoint 2002 and later If your Powerpoint program is earlier than 2002, go on line and use this link to download Powerpoint Viewer Racing Rules of Sailing © ISAF 2009-2012 This presentation © RYA 2008 Photo: © RYA Brickbats, bouquets and dud links to: TrevorLewis@trevorlewisnorwich.freeserve.co.uk Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? Previous Page Next Page What’s New for 2009? Many minor changes that: Usually clarify a rule Sometimes change a rule Sometimes change a rule number A complete rewrite of Section C of Part 2 (rules 18,19 and now 20) dealing with marks and obstructions But few real game changes

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? Previous Page Next Page This summary does not refer to some minor editing Part 2 Rules – When Boats Meet Change to preamble Deletion of rule 17.2 Rewritten Section C (rules 18, 19 and 20 at marks and obstructions) Other changes Quick guide

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page Preamble The rules of Part 2 apply between boats that are sailing in or near the racing area and intend to race, are racing, or have been racing. However, a boat not racing shall not be penalized for breaking one of these rules, except rule When a boat sailing under these rules meets a vessel that is not, she shall comply with the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (IRPCAS) or government right-of-way rules. If the sailing instructions so state, the rules of Part 2 are replaced by the right-of-way rules of the IRPCAS or by government right-of-way rules. 22.1. However, an alleged breach of those rules shall not be grounds for a protest except by the race committee or protest committee. PART 2, WHEN BOATS MEET

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page Preamble The rules of Part 2 apply between boats that are sailing in or near the racing area and intend to race, are racing, or have been racing. However, a boat not racing shall not be penalized for breaking one of these rules, except rule When a boat sailing under these rules meets a vessel that is not, she shall comply with the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (IRPCAS) or government right-of-way rules. If the sailing instructions so state, the rules of Part 2 are replaced by the right-of-way rules of the IRPCAS or by government right-of-way rules. When a boat that is subject to the racing rules may not have complied with the IRPCAS when meeting a vessel that is not subject to the racing rules, another boat can now protest her 23.1. PART 2, WHEN BOATS MEET

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? No change to: Rule 10, (Port and Starboard) Rule 11, (Windward and Leeward) Rule 12, (Clear Ahead, Clear Astern) Rule 13, While Tacking Rule 14, Avoiding Contact Rule 15, Acquiring Right of Way Rule 16, Changing Course PART 2, WHEN BOATS MEET Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 17, ON THE SAME TACK; PROPER COURSE 17.1 If a boat clear astern becomes overlapped within two of her hull lengths to leeward of a boat on the same tack, she shall not sail above her proper course while they remain on the same tack and overlapped within that distance, unless in doing so she promptly sails astern of the other boat. This rule does not apply if the overlap begins while the windward boat is required by rule 13 to keep clear. PART 2, WHEN BOATS MEET Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 17, ON THE SAME TACK; PROPER COURSE 17.1 If a boat clear astern becomes overlapped within two of her hull lengths to leeward of a boat on the same tack, she shall not sail above her proper course while they remain on the same tack and overlapped within that distance, unless in doing so she promptly sails astern of the other boat. This rule does not apply if the overlap begins while the windward boat is required by rule 13 to keep clear. No change, except that the words underlined have been added to harmonise with new rules 18 and 19. At marks and obstructions, opposite-tack boats can be overlapped – see the definition Overlap. A gybe at a mark or obstruction will end a previous rule 17.1 limitation just like in open water. A fresh proper course limitation may then apply while at a mark, as will be seen, but not after it is passed PART 2, WHEN BOATS MEET Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 17, ON THE SAME TACK; PROPER COURSE 17.2 Except on a beat to windward, while a boat is less than two of her hull lengths from a leeward boat or a boat clear astern steering a course to leeward of her, she shall not sail below her proper course unless she gybes. Rule 17.2 is deleted PART 2, WHEN BOATS MEET Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 17, ON THE SAME TACK; PROPER COURSE DELETION OF RULE 17.2 This was always permitted Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 17, ON THE SAME TACK; PROPER COURSE DELETION OF RULE 17.2 This was always permitted Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 17, ON THE SAME TACK; PROPER COURSE DELETION OF RULE 17.2 This was always permitted It still is Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 17, ON THE SAME TACK; PROPER COURSE DELETION OF RULE 17.2 This was always permitted Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 17, ON THE SAME TACK; PROPER COURSE DELETION OF RULE 17.2 This was always permitted Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 17, ON THE SAME TACK; PROPER COURSE DELETION OF RULE 17.2 This was always permitted It still is Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 17, ON THE SAME TACK; PROPER COURSE DELETION OF RULE 17.2 This was not permitted Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 17, ON THE SAME TACK; PROPER COURSE DELETION OF RULE 17.2 This was not permitted Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 17, ON THE SAME TACK; PROPER COURSE DELETION OF RULE 17.2 This was not permitted It now is (as long as Yellow keeps clear) Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 17, ON THE SAME TACK; PROPER COURSE DELETION OF RULE 17.2 This was not permitted Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 17, ON THE SAME TACK; PROPER COURSE DELETION OF RULE 17.2 This was not permitted Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 17, ON THE SAME TACK; PROPER COURSE DELETION OF RULE 17.2 This was not permitted It now is (as long as Yellow keeps clear) Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS Comprised rule 18, Rounding and Passing Marks and Obstructions, and Rule 19, Room to Tack at an Obstruction Issues: Rule 18 was a ‘good game’ at marks, but long and difficult to understand Rule 18 changed rights of way Marks and Obstructions are really different issues – marks are more about tactics than safety, obstructions are more about safety than tactics, and, in practice, no one applied two-length zones to obstructions Rule 18 started to apply ‘when boats are about to round or pass…’, which was unclear (and misunderstood) Two-length zone too small for fast boats Rule 19 was better, but some minor defects needed addressing Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS Main Solutions to Problems One rule for marks (rule 18) and a simpler one at obstructions (rule 19) with no ‘zone’ Old rule 19, Room to Tack at an Obstruction, becomes rule 20 As far as possible, don’t change rights of way, but limit those rights by entitling the other boat to room at marks defined as ‘Mark-Room’ Delete ‘about to round’, and, at marks: change the two-length zone to a zone normally of three lengths, and retain the obligations that ‘about to round’ created Simplify rights and obligations at a ‘continuing obstruction’ by reserving that term for a non-moving object or feature only avoid game changes, correct anomalies, write as simply as possible, minimise exceptions, discourage last-minute claims and contact Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS WHICH RULE APPLIES? A hail for room to tack has priority. When rule 20, Room to Tack at an Obstruction applies (Water to tack, please!), rules 18, Mark-Room, and 19, Room to Pass an Obstruction, do not (Preamble to Section C) No change apart from having separate rules for marks and obstructions Rule 18, Mark-Room applies at marks, including marks that are also obstructions (Rule 19.1). So the committee boat on the finishing line will often be both a mark and an obstruction. Rule 18 applies when passing it No change apart from having separate rules for marks and obstructions However, at a continuing obstruction, rule 19 always applies and rule 18 does not (rule 19.1), even if the continuing obstruction is a mark (rule 18.1(d)). ‘Leave Antarctica to starboard’ (Vendée Globe): Antarctica has a required side, and so it is a mark, but it is also a continuing obstruction, so rule 19 applies, and technically there is no ‘zone’! No change apart from having separate rules for marks and obstructions At all other obstructions, rule 19 applies No change apart from having a separate rule for marks and obstructions Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS Does ANY rule of Section C apply? Section C rules (rules 18,19 and 20) do not apply at a starting mark surrounded by navigable water or its anchor line from the time boats are approaching them to start until they have passed them (Preamble to Section C) No change Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS So let’s consider a mark that is not a starting mark surrounded by navigable water when boats are approaching it to start until they have passed it is not a continuing obstruction Does rule 18 apply? It does not apply between boats on opposite tacks on a beat to windward (rule 18.1(a)) No change It does not apply between boats on opposite tacks when the proper course at the mark for one but not both of them is to tack (rule 18.1(b)) No change It does not apply between a boat approaching a mark and one leaving it (rule 18.1(c)) No change – you used to have to read the cases, now it’s in the rule Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS If none of those exceptions apply we have a mark where, as before, rule 18 applies because it is not a starting mark surrounded by navigable water when boats are approaching it to start until they have passed it it is not a continuing obstruction it is not being approached by boats on opposite tacks on a beat to windward it is not being approached by boats on opposite tacks when the proper course at the mark for one but not both of them is to tack both boats are approaching and must leave it on the same side - In other words, a leeward mark (always), a gybe mark (always) or a windward mark (at the mark, and sometimes when approaching it) Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS When will rule 18 will start to apply at this mark? OLD RULE 18 When boats are about to round or pass it NEW RULE 18 -When at least one of them is in the zone The zone is now defined as: The area around a mark within a distance of three hull lengths of the boat nearer to it. A boat is in the zone when any part of her hull is in the zone. In addition, rule 86.1(b) says that sailing instructions may change to ‘two’ or ‘four’ the number of hull lengths determining the zone around marks, provided that the number is the same for all marks and all boats using those marks. The match racing and team racing zone is two lengths Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS So is this any different from the old rule? No – the old rule sometimes lasted further past the mark than it needed to No – although it is written differently. Rule 18 may apply again if the other boat then tacks, no change No – what was ‘case law’ is now in the rule Yes – but you had to read the cases to realise that rule 18 had not stopped applying New rule 18 or its obligation to give mark-room stops applying: - When no further mark-room needs be given, or, if earlier: If either of the boats passes head to wind and while they are now on opposite tacks If the boat ahead passes the mark and when leaving it then meets the boat astern approaching it If there is no overlap and the boat entitled to mark-room leaves the zone before the mark is passed, e.g., in light wind and strong tide Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS Old rule 18 at said when room ( as clarified for marks) had to be given It told you that, when room applied between overlapped boats, rule 10 or 11 might also apply. It did not say which It changed the right of way when P running ahead of S entered the zone first. S then had to keep clear which (implicitly) overrode rule10 It DISAPPLIED only rule 16 for a right-of-way boat changing course to round or pass a mark New rule 18, applying only at marks, says when mark-room must be given Rules 10, 11 and 12 continue to apply, limited or enhanced at times by having to give mark-room This is implicit, it is not said explicitly It doesn’t change rule 10 when P running ahead of S enters the zone first. S retains right of way, but P is entitled to mark-room from S It EXONERATES failure to keep clear when mark-room is not given, and breaches of rules 10 – 13, 15 and 16 when taking mark-room at the mark Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room (a) When boats are overlapped the outside boat shall give the inside boat mark-room, unless rule 18.2(b) applies. (b) If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the boat clear astern at that moment shall thereafter give her mark-room. (c) When a boat is required to give mark-room by rule 18.2(b), she shall continue to do so even if later an overlap is broken or a new overlap begins. However, if either boat passes head to wind or if the boat entitled to mark-room leaves the zone, rule 18.2(b) ceases to apply. (d) If there is reasonable doubt that a boat obtained or broke an overlap in time, it shall be presumed that she did not. (e) If a boat obtained an inside overlap from clear astern and, from the time the overlap began, the outside boat has been unable to give mark-room, she is not required to give it. Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS DEFINITION MARK-ROOM Room for a boat to sail to the mark and then room to sail her proper course while at the mark. However, mark-room does not include room to tack unless the boat is overlapped to windward and on the inside of the boat required to give mark-room. ‘Room for a boat to sail to the mark…’: room has its defined meaning, so, The space a boat needs in the existing conditions, while manoeuvring promptly in a seamanlike way, to sail to the mark… ‘…and then room to sail her proper course while at the mark…’: so, …and then the space the boat needs while at the mark, in the existing conditions and while manoeuvring promptly in a seamanlike way, to sail a course to finish as soon as possible in the absence of the boat required to give mark-room… Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room When boats are overlapped the outside boat shall give the inside boat mark-room, unless rule 18.2(b) applies. If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the boat clear astern at that moment shall thereafter give her mark-room. Rule 18.2(a) does not apply very often. That’s because rule 18.2(b) will apply when positions at zone entry are relevant And it will not apply at a windward mark when overlapped on the same tack after a tack in the zone by one boat, because the self-contained rule 18.3, Tacking When Approaching a Mark, will apply, and will switch off all of rule 18.2 NO CHANGE in principle – but let’s remind ourselves how this works Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room When boats are overlapped the outside boat shall give the inside boat mark-room, unless rule 18.2(b) applies. If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the boat clear astern at that moment shall thereafter give her mark-room. Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room When boats are overlapped the outside boat shall give the inside boat mark-room, unless rule 18.2(b) applies. If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the boat clear astern at that moment shall thereafter give her mark-room. Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room When boats are overlapped the outside boat shall give the inside boat mark-room, unless rule 18.2(b) applies. If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the boat clear astern at that moment shall thereafter give her mark-room. Rule 18.2(b) does not apply, as no part of rule 18 applied when the first of them reached the zone – they were on opposite tacks. BLUE’s tack then switched on rule 18 inside the zone. As they were then overlapped, rule 18.2(a) requires BLUE to give mark-room to YELLOW, and YELLOW has to keep clear within that mark-room. BLUE must give YELLOW room to tack Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room When boats are overlapped the outside boat shall give the inside boat mark-room, unless rule 18.2(b) applies. Rule 18.2(b) does not apply because the boats are not overlapped when one reaches the zone, and BLUE is clear astern, not clear ahead at that point. No part of rule 18.2 yet applies Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room When boats are overlapped the outside boat shall give the inside boat mark-room, unless rule 18.2(b) applies. Rule 18.2(b) does not apply because the boats are not overlapped when one reaches the zone, and BLUE is clear astern, not clear ahead at that point. No part of rule 18.2 yet applies They are overlapped at positions 2 and 3. Rule 18.2(a) now applies. YELLOW must give BLUE mark-room – room to sail to the mark. BLUE must keep clear – under rule 10 at position 2… Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room When boats are overlapped the outside boat shall give the inside boat mark-room, unless rule 18.2(b) applies. Rule 18.2(b) does not apply because the boats are not overlapped when one reaches the zone, and BLUE is clear astern, not clear ahead at that point. No part of rule 18.2 yet applies They are overlapped at positions 2 and 3. Rule 18.2(a) now applies. YELLOW must give BLUE mark-room – room to sail to the mark. BLUE must keep clear – under rule 10 at position 2… and under rule 11 at position 3 Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room When boats are overlapped the outside boat shall give the inside boat mark-room, unless rule 18.2(b) applies. Rule 18.2(b) does not apply because the boats are not overlapped when one reaches the zone, and BLUE is clear astern, not clear ahead at that point. No part of rule 18.2 yet applies They are overlapped at positions 2 and 3. Rule 18.2(a) now applies. YELLOW must give BLUE mark-room – room to sail to the mark. BLUE must keep clear – under rule 10 at position 2… and under rule 11 at position 3 Which boat breaks which rule when there is then contact? Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room (b) If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the boat clear astern at that moment shall thereafter give her mark-room. (c) When a boat is required to give mark-room by rule 18.2(b), she shall continue to do so even if later an overlap is broken or a new overlap begins. However, if either boat passes head to wind or if the inside boat entitled to mark-room leaves the zone, rule 18.2(b) ceases to apply. BLUE must luff to give YELLOW enough mark-room to luff to sail to the mark and then to sail her proper course while at the mark. BLUE must also keep clear under rule 10, and must still give mark-room if she becomes clear ahead Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room (b) If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the boat clear astern at that moment shall thereafter give her mark-room. BLUE must bear away to give YELLOW room to sail to the mark, and then room for YELLOW to sail her proper course while at the mark Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room (b) If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the boat clear astern at that moment shall thereafter give her mark-room. BLUE tries unsuccessfully to break the overlap before the zone. BLUE must give YELLOW room to sail to the mark, and then room to sail her proper course while at the mark. If BLUE cannot now do so, BLUE breaks rule 18.2(b). BLUE must bear this in mind before deciding to luff Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room (b) If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the boat clear astern at that moment shall thereafter give her mark-room. BLUE tries unsuccessfully to break the overlap before the zone. BLUE must give YELLOW room to sail to the mark, and then room to sail her proper course while at the mark. If BLUE cannot now do so, BLUE breaks rule 18.2(b). BLUE must bear this in mind before deciding to luff Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room (b) If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the boat clear astern at that moment shall thereafter give her mark-room. BLUE tries unsuccessfully to break the overlap before the zone. BLUE must give YELLOW room to sail to the mark, and then room to sail her proper course while at the mark. If BLUE cannot now do so, BLUE breaks rule 18.2(b). BLUE must bear this in mind before deciding to luff Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room (b) If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the boat clear astern at that moment shall thereafter give her mark-room. When RED will reach the zone, she must give mark-room to the three other boats. They are all overlapped on her. If she does not, she will break rule 18.2(b). To avoid that, she must take early action before the zone so as to be able to give mark-room. So must the two BLUE boats, to give YELLOW room. Is there any exception to this? Not here, since mark-room can be given Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room (b) If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the boat clear astern at that moment shall thereafter give her mark-room. If RED and the BLUE boats have been overlapped for some time, RED has to be ready to give them mark-room at the zone YELLOW, clear astern of the other three, will have to give all of them mark-room if she enters the zone after them, even if she then gybes onto starboard tack with right of way under rule 10 Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room (b) If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the boat clear astern at that moment shall thereafter give her mark-room. If RED and the BLUE boats have been overlapped for some time, RED has to be ready to give them mark-room at the zone If YELLOW has only just become overlapped from clear astern, and the BLUE boat next to her will not be able to give her mark-room at the zone, BLUE is not required to give it. If she can then give it after zone entry, she must do so Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room (b) If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the boat clear astern at that moment shall thereafter give her mark-room. If a boat obtained an inside overlap from clear astern and, from the time the overlap began, the outside boat has been unable to give mark-room, she is not required to give it. But if instead RED and the BLUE boats had overhauled YELLOW, they will have no excuse for not giving mark-room, and should already have started to ‘move over’ to be able to give that room Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room (b) If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the boat clear astern at that moment shall thereafter give her mark-room. BLUE may try to shake off YELLOW’s overlap, before the zone is reached. If BLUE succeeds, she may sail for the mark knowing that YELLOW must now give her mark-room. This is at the risk of failing to shake off the overlap. If YELLOW is still overlapped at BLUE’s zone entry, nothing exempts BLUE from her obligation to give mark-room Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room (b) If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the boat clear astern at that moment shall thereafter give her mark-room. Ideally, both boats would like to hold their course under spinnaker into the zone – it would be a proper course for both of them Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room (b) If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room. If a boat is clear ahead when she reaches the zone, the boat clear astern at that moment shall thereafter give her mark-room. Ideally, both boats would like to hold their course under spinnaker into the zone – it would be a proper course for both of them They cannot. YELLOW, the right-of-way boat, on starboard tack, must give BLUE , the inside keep-clear boat, room to sail to the mark BLUE cannot continue as far as she would like before gybing, and must take only the room she needs to sail in a seamanlike way to the mark Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room (b) If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room… However, if an inside right-of-way boat wants to take more room than just room to sail to the mark, she may do so (subject to not delaying her gybe beyond her proper course), and the outside boat must keep clear No change, since rule 11 still applies Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room (b) If boats are overlapped when the first of them reaches the zone, the outside boat at that moment shall thereafter give the inside boat mark-room… Once at the mark, the mark-room that has to be given is room for a boat to sail her proper course while at the mark Old rule 18, as in the last slide, said that an inside right-of-way boat can sail a wide proper course at a mark for a tactical rounding, whereas an inside give-way boat was limited to room for a seamanlike rounding The room for an inside keep-clear boat to sail a proper course at the mark may now be a little more generous than room for seamanlike rounding, but it is limited by the fact that the proper course entitlement begins only at the mark, and the inside keep-clear boat has no right to try to sail wider before she gets to the mark Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.2 Giving Mark-Room If there is reasonable doubt that a boat obtained or broke an overlap in time, it shall be presumed that she did not. No change Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.3 Tacking When Approaching a Mark If two boats were approaching a mark on opposite tacks and one of them changes tack, and as a result is subject to rule 13 in the zone when the other is fetching the mark, rule 18.2 does not thereafter apply. The boat that changed tack shall not cause the other boat to sail above close-hauled to avoid her or prevent the other boat from passing the mark on the required side, and shall give mark-room if the other boat becomes overlapped inside her. NO MAJOR CHANGE, APART FROM THE INCREASED ZONE SIZE Fetching is now defined – being in a position to pass to windward of the mark and leave it on the required side without changing tack Some unintended ambiguities have been removed Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.4 Gybing When an inside overlapped right-of-way boat must gybe at a mark to sail her proper course, until she gybes she shall sail no farther from the mark than needed to sail that course. Rule 18.4 does not apply at a gate mark. The new last sentence means that YELLOW can belatedly decide to sail for the other gate mark and is not required to gybe at the one being passed Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.5 Exoneration When a boat is taking mark-room to which she is entitled, she shall be exonerated if, as a result of the other boat failing to give her mark-room, she breaks a rule of Section A, or (b) if, by rounding the mark on her proper course, she breaks a rule of Section A or rule 15 or 16 This gives exoneration for rule breaches that the boat entitled to mark-room may not have been compelled to make, so rule 64.1(c) cannot apply, but these clauses will Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.5 Exoneration When a boat is taking mark-room to which she is entitled, she shall be exonerated if, as a result of the other boat failing to give her mark-room, she breaks a rule of Section A, or (b) if, by rounding the mark on her proper course, she breaks a rule of Section A or rule 15 or 16. GREEN was not giving RED mark-room and will be penalized. Rule 10 is not disapplied by rule 18, but RED is exonerated under rule 18.5(a) for breaking rule 10. Note however that there is no exoneration for RED for breaking rule 14 if there is avoidable injury or damage Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.5 Exoneration When a boat is taking mark-room to which she is entitled, she shall be exonerated if, as a result of the other boat failing to give her mark-room, she breaks a rule of Section A, or (b) if, by rounding the mark on her proper course, she breaks a rule of Section A or rule 15 or 16. Rule 18.2(b) requires YELLOW to give mark-room to inside overlapped BLUE. YELLOW breaks the overlap inside the zone. YELLOW must still give mark-room (Rule 18.2(c)). She does not. BLUE is rounding on her proper course. BLUE is exonerated under rule18.5(a) for breaking rule 12 Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 18.5 Exoneration When a boat is taking mark-room to which she is entitled, she shall be exonerated if, as a result of the other boat failing to give her mark-room, she breaks a rule of Section A, or (b) if, by rounding the mark on her proper course, she breaks a rule of Section A or rule 15 or 16. Before the mark, BLUE is (just) keeping clear. At the mark, YELLOW bears away hard, but on her proper course, and does not give BLUE room to keep clear. YELLOW breaks rule 16.1 but is to be exonerated. BLUE breaks rule 11 by now not keeping clear – she must expect YELLOW’s bear-away Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS RULE 19, ROOM TO PASS AN OBSTRUCTION 19.1 When Rule 19 Applies Rule 19 applies between boats at an obstruction except when it is also a mark the boats are required to leave on the same side. However, at a continuing obstruction, rule 19 always applies and rule 18 does not. Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS RULE 19, ROOM TO PASS AN OBSTRUCTION 19.2 Giving Room at an Obstruction (a) A right-of-way boat may choose to pass an obstruction on either side. (b) When boats are overlapped, the outside boat shall give the inside boat room between her and the obstruction, unless she has been unable to do so from the time the overlap began. (c) While boats are passing a continuing obstruction, if a boat that was clear astern and required to keep clear becomes overlapped between the other boat and the obstruction and, at the moment the overlap begins, there is not room for her to pass between them, she is not entitled to room under rule 19.2(b). While the boats remain overlapped, she shall keep clear and rules 10 and 11 do not apply. Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS Rule 18, Mark-Room Applies at all marks, inc. marks that are obstructions, except a mark that is a continuing obstruction The room to be given and taken is is Mark-Room, as defined There is a zone, at which rights and obligations are often fixed There are built-in immediate exonerations for breaking several rules, especially rule 16, Changing Course, even if not compelled to Rule 18.4 may require an inside right-of-way boat to gybe Rule 19, Room to Pass an Obstruction Applies at all obstructions that are not marks, and at continuing obstructions that are marks The room to be given and taken is ‘ordinary’ room, as defined There is no zone. It all depends on whether room can be given when it is needed There are no built-in exonerations, though exoneration via rule 64.1(c) may be available in a protest No part of the rule puts an explicit gybing obligation on a boat Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS BLUE, with rule 11 right-of-way, has to decide whether to pass the obstruction to windward or to leeward If she decides to pass it to windward, then when she changes course to do so, she must give YELLOW room as required by rule 16, Changing Course, to continue to keep clear under rule 11 If she decides to pass it to leeward, she must give room for YELLOW to do likewise Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS Because there is no ‘zone’, BLUE’s obligation to give room depends on whether she can do so when an overlap begins near an obstruction Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS Because there is no ‘zone’, BLUE’s obligation to give room depends on whether she can do so when an overlap begins near an obstruction Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS When boats are approaching an obstruction off-wind on opposite tacks, they are overlapped, because the definition Overlap (which normally confines that term to same-tack boats and opposite tack boats at marks) extends it to boats sailing more than ninety degrees from the true wind GREEN, on starboard, decides which way to pass the obstruction. If she bears away, she must give room to RED, and if she gybes to port she must now keep clear of RED under rule 11 Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS Another vessel that is not racing can always be an obstruction to other boats (no change) A boat that is racing can be an obstruction to other boats if they are required to keep clear of her, give her room or mark-room, or (under rule 22) avoid her (no change) If none of the above applies, a give-way boat cannot be an obstruction as defined (no change) BUT –a vessel under way, including a boat racing, is never a continuing obstruction (CHANGE). YELLOW is an obstruction to GREEN and BLUE, but NOT a continuing obstruction to which rule 19.2(c) applies. If GREEN catches YELLOW and BLUE, rules 12, then 11, 15, 17 and 19.2(b) apply. If GREEN becomes overlapped to leeward of BLUE, BLUE must now give room under rule 19.2(b) and keep clear under rule 11, if she can Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 19.2(c) While boats are passing a continuing obstruction, if a boat that was clear astern and required to keep clear becomes overlapped between the other boat and the obstruction and, at the moment the overlap begins, there is not room for her to pass between them, she is not entitled to room under rule 19.2(b). While the boats remain overlapped, she shall keep clear and rules 10 and 11 do not apply. RED is a clear-astern keep-clear boat under rule 12. If she becomes overlapped inside YELLOW and there IS room to pass between, she is entitled to room, and she becomes right-of-way boat under rule 11 If there is no room for RED to pass between, she is not entitled to room. She instantly becomes required to keep clear, and rule 11 does not apply Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS 19.2(c) While boats are passing a continuing obstruction, if a boat that was clear astern and required to keep clear becomes overlapped between the other boat and the obstruction and, at the moment the overlap begins, there is not room for her to pass between them, she is not entitled to room under rule 19.2(b). While the boats remain overlapped, she shall keep clear and rules 10 and 11 do not apply. GREEN is astern, but is the right-of-way boat under rule 10, and not the one required to keep clear. Rule 19.2(c) does not apply. Technically, the general right to room for GREEN under 19.2(b) applies, but more importantly rule 10 still applies. RED on port has to keep clear of GREEN on starboard, and the bank or shore is not relevant to that obligation Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS RULE 20, ROOM TO TACK AT AN OBSTRUCTION 20.1 Hailing and Responding When approaching an obstruction, a boat sailing close-hauled or above may hail for room to tack and avoid another boat on the same tack. After a boat hails, (a) she shall give the hailed boat time to respond; (b) the hailed boat shall respond either by tacking as soon as possible, or by immediately replying ‘You tack’ and then giving the hailing boat room to tack and avoid her; and (c) when the hailed boat responds, the hailing boat shall tack as soon as possible. 20.2 Exoneration When a boat is taking room to which she is entitled under rule 20.1(b), she shall be exonerated if she breaks a rule of Section A or rule 15 or 16. 20.3 When Not to Hail A boat shall not hail unless safety requires her to make a substantial course change to avoid the obstruction. Also, she shall not hail if the obstruction is a mark that the hailed boat is fetching. Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? ROOM TO TACK AT AN OBSTRUCTION Rule 20, previously rule 19, has new words but the same rights and obligations It is made even clearer that when one boat hails for room to tack, the other must respond (either by tacking or replying ‘You tack’, and then giving the hailing boat room to tack and avoid her) If the hailed boat does not believe that the hailing boat was entitled to hail for room to tack, her only option is to protest The hailing boat will not be entitled to hail for room to tack if safety does not require her to make a substantial course change to avoid the obstruction, or the obstruction is a mark that the hailed boat is fetching, or The obstruction is a starting mark, like a line-end committee boat, when boats are starting (see preamble to Section C) Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION C, AT MARKS AND OBSTRUCTIONS RULE 20, ROOM TO TACK AT AN OBSTRUCTION As with the rest of Section C, rather than saying Section A rules or others do not apply, instead, there is instant exoneration for breaking a Section A rule (normally rule 10 at ‘left-hand banks’) or Section B rules 15 or 16 (at ‘right-hand banks’) when taking room to which a boat’s hail has entitled her Next Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION D, OTHER RULES Because rules 18 and 19 in Section C became 19, 19 and 20, rules 20, 21 and 22 in section D become 21, 22 and 23 References to making a penalty turn or turns are replaced with ‘Taking a penalty’ Rule 22.2 used to say: A boat shall not change course if her only purpose is to interfere with a boat making a penalty turn or one on another leg or lap of the course. It is difficult to ascertain purpose: a boat on another lap is also on another leg any way; and there can be interference without a course change. So now: 23.2 Except when sailing a proper course, a boat shall not interfere with a boat taking a penalty or sailing on another leg. Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? Previous Page Next Page This summary does not refer to some minor editing Part 2 Rules – When Boats Meet Change to preamble Deletion of rule 17.2 Rewritten Section C (rules 18, 19 and 20 at marks and obstructions) Other changes Quick guide

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? Terminology new words added: A ‘change’ to a rule includes an addition to it or deletion of all or part of it. Rule 86, Changes to the Racing Rules, as before: says which rules can be changed by sailing instructions, prescriptions and class rules says that permitted changes must be identified by referring specifically to the rule and stating the change So you cannot purport to change a non-changeable rule with a sailing instruction that has the effect of adding to the rule or deleting all or part of it Anything that is an addition to what a changeable rule says must use words like ‘In addition to rule xx, .........’. INTRODUCTION Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 1, SAFETY 1.1 Helping Those in Danger A boat or competitor shall give all possible help to any person or vessel in danger. 1.2 Life-Saving Equipment and Personal A boat shall carry adequate life-saving equipment for all persons on board, including one item ready for immediate use, unless her class rules make some other provision. Each competitor is individually responsible for wearing adequate for the conditions. Buoyancy personal buoyancy FUNDAMENTAL RULES Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 1, SAFETY 1.1 Helping Those in Danger A boat or competitor shall give all possible help to any person or vessel in danger. 1.2 Life-Saving Equipment and Personal A boat shall carry adequate life-saving equipment for all persons on board, including one item ready for immediate use, unless her class rules make some other provision. Each competitor is individually responsible for wearing adequate for the conditions. Flotation Devices a personal flotation device FUNDAMENTAL RULES Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? Life-Saving Equipment and Personal Flotation Devices Rule 40 is also changed, with references to ‘personal buoyancy’ replaced with ‘personal flotation devices’ Harmonise your sailing instructions- remove references to ‘personal buoyancy’ or ‘life-jackets’, replace with ‘personal flotation device(s)’ Consider whether to specify a minimum standard of buoyancy in Newtons FUNDAMENTAL RULES Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 3, ACCEPTANCE OF THE RULES By participating in a race conducted under these racing rules, each competitor and boat owner agrees… (c) where the matter is not one to be determined under the rules, not to resort to any court of law or any tribunal until all internal remedies provided by the ISAF or by the Court of Arbitration for Sport have been exhausted. This clause was changed to the above after most 2005-2008 rule books were printed The wording now reverts to something similar to what had previously appeared FUNDAMENTAL RULES Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULE 3, ACCEPTANCE OF THE RULES By participating in a race conducted under these racing rules, each competitor and boat owner agrees… (b) to accept the penalties imposed and other action taken under the rules, subject to the appeal and review procedures provided in them, as the final determination of any matter arising under the rules; (no change) and (c) with respect to any such determination, not to resort to any court of law or tribunal. the rule says you cannot challenge a protest / redress / appeal decision in court It has not stopped people from trying, and it is not binding on courts, but courts tend not to interfere with properly-made decisions FUNDAMENTAL RULES Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? Rule 5, Banned Substances and Methods is changed to: RULE 5, ANTI-DOPING A competitor shall comply with the World Anti-Doping Code, the rules of the World Anti-Doping Agency, and ISAF Regulation 21, Anti-Doping Code. An alleged or actual breach of this rule shall be dealt with under Regulation 21. It shall not be grounds for a protest and rule 63.1 does not apply. No significant change for most competitors FUNDAMENTAL RULES Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? SECTION D, OTHER RULES Because rules 18 and 19 in Section C became 19, 19 and 20, rules 20, 21 and 22 in section D become 21, 22 and 23 References to making a penalty turn or turns are replaced with ‘Taking a penalty’ Rule 22.2 used to say: A boat shall not change course if her only purpose is to interfere with a boat making a penalty turn or one on another leg or lap of the course. It is difficult to ascertain purpose: a boat on another lap is also on another leg any way; and there can be interference without a course change. So now: 23.2 Except when sailing a proper course, a boat shall not interfere with a boat taking a penalty or sailing on another leg. Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? PART 3, CONDUCT OF A RACE RULE 28.1, SAILING THE COURSE The string now represents a boat’s track rather than her wake. To pass the string test, there is an extra clarification at a gate, where a boat must ‘(c) pass between the marks of a gate from the direction of the previous mark.’ This removes the need to say this in sailing instructions, and will work on leeward and mid-leg gates. RULE 29, RECALLS: RULE 30, STARTING PENALTIES Minor non-critical changes Rule 30 section rule titles changed. ‘Round-an-End Rule’ becomes ‘I Flag Rule’, ’20% Penalty Rule’ becomes ‘Z Flag Rule’. This harmonises with the existing Black Flag Rule (30.3): why change? the 20% penalty could become more or less in the sailing instructions; and you can actually comply with the ‘Round-an-End’ rule without sailing round an end! Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? PART 3, CONDUCT OF A RACE RULE 31, TOUCHING A MARK Rule 31.2, describing the penalty, moves to rule 44 to be alongside the two-turns penalty Rule 31.1, which tells you not to touch marks, is now just rule 31 Rule 32.2, regarding shortening a race, now makes clear that the shortened course shall be signalled before the first boat crosses the finishing line Rule 33, Changing the Next Leg of the Course, now permits a course change to be signalled at a gate, and the rule refers to a leg being ‘decreased’ or ‘increased’ rather than ‘shortened or ‘lengthened’ (possibly to avoid confusion with shortening a race) Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? PART 4, OTHER REQUIREMENTS WHEN RACING RULE 40, PERSONAL FLOTATION DEVICES When flag Y is displayed with one sound before or with the warning signal, competitors shall wear personal flotation devices, except briefly while changing or adjusting clothing or personal equipment. Wet suits and dry suits are not personal flotation devices. ‘Personal Buoyancy’ becomes ‘Personal Flotation Devices’ Temporary ‘comfort break’ removal assumed to be allowed The rule (40.2) that had intended to bring in quick-release trapeze / hiking harnesses in 2006 was withdrawn earlier and does not reappear Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? PART 4, OTHER REQUIREMENTS WHEN RACING RULE 41, OUTSIDE HELP The rule used to permit the receiving of help ‘(a) as provided for in rule 1’, therefore when a boat is in danger That is no longer so. When a boat in danger receives help, she breaks rule 41 The remaining clauses previously (b) to (e) are relettered (a) to (d) Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? PART 4, OTHER REQUIREMENTS WHEN RACING RULE 42, PROPULSION Sailing instructions could not change rule 42. This created problems when it was desirable to allow (or even require) boats to paddle or use an engine for safety reasons, or just to get off a sandbank Rule 42.3,Propulsion: Exceptions, now says: (h) Sailing instructions may, in stated circumstances, permit propulsion using an engine or any other method, provided that the boat does not gain a significant advantage in the race. RULE 43, COMPETITOR CLOTHING AND EQUIPMENT Rule 43.1(c) now refers to ‘an equipment inspector or a measurer’. Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? PART 4, OTHER REQUIREMENTS WHEN RACING RULE 44, PENALTIES AT THE TIME OF AN INCIDENT The title and the contents are changed to incorporate the description of a one-turn penalty for touching a mark into this one rule, together with the existing two-turns penalty and scoring penalty The Scoring Penalty rule (44.3) is restructured, without any change of meaning RULE 51, MOVABLE BALLAST Amended to include sails that are not set within movable ballast, and to allow the bailing out of bilge water Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? PART 5, PROTESTS, REDRESS, HEARINGS, MISCONDUCT AND APPEALS Rule 60, RIGHT TO PROTEST, RIGHT TO REQUEST REDRESS OR RULE 69 ACTION Unintentionally, a previous rule change prevented a boat from being protested on the basis of a report she had made herself, since she would be an interested party - and rules 60.2(a) and 60.3(a) prohibit protests by a race committee or a protest committee arising from information from an interested party. An exception is now made to allow a protest based on information from the representative of the boat concerned RULE 62, REDRESS Rule 62.1(a) now prohibits requesting redress as an alternative to asking for a reopening under rule 66 RULE 63, HEARINGS Rule 63.4, Interested Party, now requires protest committee members to declare any possible self-interest as soon as they are aware of it Previous Section Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? PART 5, PROTESTS, REDRESS, HEARINGS, MISCONDUCT AND APPEALS RULE 64, DECISIONS There is a new clause (b) in section 64.1, Penalties and Exoneration, which says that when a boat has already taken a penalty (by a turn or turns, or by retiring) then she is not to be penalized further unless she broke a rule for which the penalty is a non-excludable disqualification (DNE) Effectively, this applies when she broke a right-of-way rule or rule 31, Touching a Mark, and took a penalty, but is nevertheless protested, and the protest committee finds that she also broke rule 2, Fair Sailing Rules 64.1(b) and (c) now become 64.1(c) and (d). Protest committees often refer to these rules in decisions Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? PART 5, PROTESTS, REDRESS, HEARINGS, MISCONDUCT AND APPEALS RULE 69, GROSS MISCONDUCT The rule is clarified to deal with the following situations: when the competitor has a good reason not to attend when the competitor does not provide a good reason for not attending when an event’s protest committee is unable or unwilling to call a hearing before it disbands When an international jury appointed by ISAF penalizes a boat under rule 69.1, or is unable to hold a hearing and so must forward a report, the report goes to ISAF as well as to the national authorities of the venue, the competitor and the boat owner. Most International Juries are NOT appointed by ISAF. ISAF as well as a national authority can now initiate a hearing under rule 69.2 Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? PART 5, PROTESTS, REDRESS, HEARINGS, MISCONDUCT AND APPEALS RULE 70, APPEALS AND REQUESTS TO A NATIONAL AUTHORITY There is a race organized by a GBR club to from the Solent to Cherbourg, and there are incidents resulting in protests and requests for redress at the start, in mid-Channel and at the finishing line. The protests are heard in France. Where are appeals or requests for confirmation to go? Now we know 70.3 An appeal under rule 70.1 or a request by a protest committee under rule 70.2 shall be sent to the national authority with which the organizing authority is associated under rule 89.1. However, if boats will pass through the waters of more than one national authority while racing, the sailing instructions shall identify the national authority to which appeals or requests may be sent. Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? PART 6, ENTRY AND QUALIFICATION The ISAF Sailor Classification Code, Regulation 22, is a system for classifying competitors by work and skills into professionals, amateurs and industry experts (though those terms are not used). An event can then limit the number of non-amateurs on a boat to give small budgets a fighting chance against deep pockets. It can also restrict non-amateurs from performing crucial functions like helming, either for all or part of a race New rule 79, Classification, makes the ISAF system the only one RULE 79, CLASSIFICATION If the notice of race or class rules state that some or all competitors must satisfy classification requirements, the classification shall be carried out as described in ISAF Regulation 22, Sailor Classification Code. Old Rule 79, Advertising, becomes rule 80, and old rule 80, Rescheduled Races, becomes rule 81 Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? PART 6, ENTRY AND QUALIFICATION RULE 81, RESCHEDULED RACES When a race has been rescheduled, all boats entered in the original race shall be notified. New entries that meet the entry requirements of the original race may be accepted at the discretion of the race committee. This removes references in the rule to rule 36 and to boats disqualified under the Black Flag rule not being entitled to participate. That is because those issues are not related to the fact of a race being rescheduled. Separately, a new case submission offers the following clarification: ‘A ‘rescheduled race’ is a race for which a new time for the warning signal is announced that is significantly later than the time of, and often the date of, the warning signal in the sailing instructions. The original race may have been postponed before…or after the warning signal, abandoned either before or after the starting signal, or subject to a general recall after the starting signal. The term is used only in rule 81, for the purposes of notifying the original entrants and accepting new entries.’ Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? PART 7, RACE ORGANIZATION RULE 86, CHANGES TO THE RACING RULES Sailing instructions and prescriptions cannot change the ISAF Sailor Classification Code, either directly or via rule 79 which makes it the only method that can be used to classify competitors Sailing instructions can change to ‘two’ or ‘four’ the number of hull lengths determining the zone around marks, provided that the number is the same for all marks and all boats using those marks. If the sailing instructions change a rule or that definition, they shall refer specifically to the rule or definition and state the change From 1 January 2011, when a class rule changes a racing rule when allowed to do so, (rules 42, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53 and 54) the changes must, like changes to sailing instructions, refer specifically to the rule and state the change. So classes have two years to address this Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? PART 7, RACE ORGANIZATION RULE 87, CHANGES TO CLASS RULES The sailing instructions may change a class rule only when the class rules permit the change, or when written permission of the class association for the change is displayed on the official notice board. This new rule clears up an uncertainty, but classes have to decide which of their rules can be changed with or without notice, and race committees have to be careful when writing sailing instructions that purport to relax a class rule or add further restrictions. This could cause issues: when class rules require membership of the class association, and there are races for boats of that class when requiring boats of a class that bans electronics to carry a VHF radio When wishing to allow cruisers not to have to sail with all cushions in winter As this is a new rule being inserted at this point, previous rule numbers 87 to 90 are each increased by one Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? PART 7, RACE ORGANIZATION RULE 88, NATIONAL PRESCRIPTIONS 88.1 The prescriptions that apply to an event are the prescriptions of the national authority with which the organizing authority is associated under rule 89.1. However, if boats will pass through the waters of more than one national authority while racing, the sailing instructions shall identify any other prescriptions that will apply and when they will apply. A race from Britain to Spain passes through French waters. Which prescriptions apply? The sailing instructions must tell us 88.2 The sailing instructions may change a prescription. However, a national authority may restrict changes to its prescriptions with a prescription to this rule, provided the ISAF approves its application to do so. The restricted prescriptions shall not be changed by the sailing instructions. When a national authority restricts prescription changes, it needs ISAF’s approval. (ISAF has approved RYA restrictions for 2009 onwards) Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? PART 7, RACE ORGANIZATION Rule 89 (now rule 90) required the sailing instructions for an international event to include, in English, the applicable national prescriptions What is an ‘international event’? To avoid having to define this, rule 90(b) now requires: When appropriate, for an event where entries from other countries are expected, the sailing instructions shall include, in English, the applicable national prescriptions. Previous Section Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? Previous Page Next Page This summary does not refer to some minor editing Part 2 Rules – When Boats Meet Change to preamble Deletion of rule 17.2 Rewritten Section C (rules 18, 19 and 20 at marks and obstructions) Other changes Quick guide

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? What’s New for 2009? QUICK GUIDE TO THE RULE CHANGES Many minor changes that: usually clarify a rule sometimes change a rule sometimes change a rule number A complete rewrite of Section C of Part 2 (rules 18,19 and now 20) dealing with marks and obstructions But few real game changes Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULES THAT AFFECT COMPETITORS Fundamental Rule 1.2 The term ‘personal buoyancy’ is replaced by ‘personal flotation device’ Fundamental Rule 3, Acceptance of the Rules You are not meant to try to challenge the decisions of protest committees and appeal bodies in court Preamble to Part 2, When Boats Meet You as a competitor now have the same right as a race committee or a protest committee to protest a boat in your race that does not comply with the Collision Regulations (IRPCAS) or local navigation byelaws when she meets a vessel that is not racing, like a sailing boat cruising through the course Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULES THAT AFFECT COMPETITORS No change to: Rule 10, (Port and Starboard) Rule 11, (Windward and Leeward) Rule 12, (Clear Ahead, Clear Astern) Rule 13, While Tacking Rule 14, Avoiding Contact Rule 15, Acquiring Right of Way Rule 16, Changing Course Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULES THAT AFFECT COMPETITORS RULE 17, ON THE SAME TACK; PROPER COURSE 17.2 Except on a beat to windward, while a boat is less than two of her hull lengths from a leeward boat or a boat clear astern steering a course to leeward of her, she shall not sail below her proper course unless she gybes. Rule 17.2 is deleted A windward boat can bear away towards a leeward boat, as long as the windward boat continues to keep clear A boat clear ahead can bear away towards the course of a boat clear astern steering a course to leeward of her as long as she gives room There are several examples in the main section of this presentation Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULES THAT AFFECT COMPETITORS Rules 18 and 19, which dealt with rounding and passing marks and obstructions, have been rewritten – to make them easier to understand to avoid them including exceptions to the rules which apply away from marks and obstructions to make clearer which rules apply at marks, and which rules apply at obstructions to allow for the fact that some types of boats are very fast relative to their length to eliminate ambiguities that had been found in the previous rules Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULES THAT AFFECT COMPETITORS This has been done by: splitting old rule 18, which used to deal with both marks and obstructions, into two rules – rule 18, which applies only when passing marks rule 19, which applies when passing obstructions This means that old rule 19, which gave the right to hail for room to tack at obstructions, has become rule 20 (with new words) Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULES THAT AFFECT COMPETITORS This has been done by: increasing the standard size of the ‘zone’ at a mark from two hull lengths of the boat nearer to it to three hull lengths getting rid of the vague concept that rule 18 begins to apply when boats are ‘about to round or pass’, and making it start instead at the three-length zone – which is now just called the ‘zone’, since sailing instructions can reduce it to two lengths or increase it to four lengths (for all boats on that course and for all marks of that course) retaining the rights and obligations based on the right-of-way rules that apply away from marks (port / starboard, windward / leeward, clear ahead / clear astern), and then adding to them or limiting them by the requirement to give room (the old rules already did this to a certain extent) defining the room to be given at marks more clearly Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? RULES THAT AFFECT COMPETITORS ROOM AT MARKS There is a new term – Mark-Room. Rule 18’s title is Mark-Room, as its primary purpose is to show how the obligation to give room at marks adds to or limits the normal rules Mark-room is defined as ‘room for a boat to sail to the mark, and then room to sail her proper course while at the mark…’ Mark-room applies only at marks. The ordinary definition of room applies at obstructions Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? ROOM AT MARKS The standard three hull lengths for the zone can be changed in the sailing instructions to two or four lengths, as long as this is done for all marks on that course and all boats at those marks When a boat has to give mark-room from zone entry until no more room is needed, there are only limited excuses for failure to do so. Therefore, a boat that will have to give room has to prepare to do so before the zone is entered, which is what she had to do under the old rule If something was not permitted or not required at a mark under the old rule, it is almost always not permitted or not required under the new rule If something WAS permitted or required at a mark under the old rule, it almost always still is There are lots of examples in the main section of this presentation RULES THAT AFFECT COMPETITORS Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? ROOM TO PASS AN OBSTRUCTION – NOW A RULE ON ITS OWN Under the new rule 19, there is no ‘zone’ when approaching an obstruction and passing it. If overlaps are made or broken close to the obstruction or at the obstruction, this will decide whether room has to be given. If room can be given, it must be given when boats are overlapped. When they are not overlapped, the rule does not apply. (This is in fact how most people sailed at obstructions under the old rule anyway!) When an obstruction can be passed on either side, the right-of-way boat has the choice as to which side to pass the obstruction. That was always the case, but the rule now says so explicitly As before, another boat racing can be an obstruction to two boats that must keep clear of her, give room or mark-room to her, or avoid her under rule 22. But another vessel under way, including a boat that is racing, cannot now be a CONTINUING obstruction to other boats. The continuing obstruction rule now applies only between boats passing a fixed feature RULES THAT AFFECT COMPETITORS Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? ROOM TO TACK AT AN OBSTRUCTION Rule 20, previously rule 19, has new words but the same rights and obligations It is made even clearer that when one boat hails for room to tack, the other must respond (either by tacking or replying ‘You tack’, and then giving the hailing boat room to tack and avoid her) If the hailed boat does not believe that the hailing boat was entitled to hail for room to tack, her only option is to protest The hailing boat will not be entitled to hail for room to tack if safety does not require her to make a substantial course change to avoid the obstruction, or the obstruction is a mark that the hailed boat is fetching, or The obstruction is a starting mark, like a line-end committee boat, when boats are starting (see preamble to Section C) RULES THAT AFFECT COMPETITORS Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? Rule 28, Sailing the Course This now deals with gate marks, and so a boat’s obligation at a gate does not have to be spelled out in the sailing instructions Rule 31, Touching a Mark The part of the rule that described the one-turn penalty has been moved to be with the description of the two-turns penalty in rule 44 Rule 40, Personal Flotation Devices The title and the words change ‘personal buoyancy’ to ‘personal flotation devices’ (as in rule 1). The device can be temporarily removed Rule 41, Outside Help A boat in danger that receives help now breaks this rule Rule 42, Propulsion Sailing instructions can allow you to paddle or use an engine in stated circumstances provided you do not gain an advantage RULES THAT AFFECT COMPETITORS Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? Rule 51, Movable Ballast Sails not in use must be properly stowed – and you can bail bilge water! Rule 62, Redress If you are unhappy about a protest committee’s decision, your only option (apart from lodging an appeal) is to ask for a reopening under rule 66. You cannot bypass that rule by asking for redress claiming the decision was an improper action Rule 64.1(b), Decisions: Penalties and Exoneration This confirms that if you are found in a protest hearing to have broken a rule, but you took a penalty at the time of the incident (by taking a turn(s) penalty or by retiring), you cannot be penalized further, unless you also broke rule 2, Fair Sailing, whose penalty is a non-excludable ( = non-discardable) disqualification. If so, you will be given that ‘DNE’ RULES THAT AFFECT COMPETITORS Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? There’s a new rule 19, so old 19, 20, 21 and 22 are now 20, 21, 22 and 23 There’s a new rule 79, so old 79 and 80 are now 80 and 81 There’s a new rule 87, so old 87, 88, 89 and 90 are now 88, 89, 90 and 91 New rule 42.3(h) allows sailing instructions to permit the use of engines or other means of propulsion in stated circumstances, and rule 86.1(b), Changes to the Racing Rules, allows the mark zone’s new 3 hull lengths to be stated to be either 2 or 4 hull lengths, subject to conditions New titles for rules 1.2, 5, 18, 30.1, 30.2, 40, 44, 63.7, 69.2, 70, 71, 88 Rule 31.2, the one-turn mark-touching penalty, is now described in rule 44.2 together with the two-turns penalty. Rule 31.1 becomes rule 31 Rule 60.2(a) says that a race committee can once again protest a boat based on information from that boat (as in a declaration) Sailing instructions for races to or through other countries’ waters must say where appeals must go (new 70.3) and whose prescriptions apply ( new 88.1) RULES THAT AFFECT RACE COMMITTEES AND SAILING INSTRUCTIONS Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? New rule 87, Changes to Class Rules, says that sailing instructions may change a class rule only when the class rules permit the change, or when written permission of the class association for the change is displayed on the official notice board So classes have to decide which of their rules can be changed with or without notice, and race committees have to be careful when writing sailing instructions that purport to relax a class rule or add further restrictions RULES THAT AFFECT RACE COMMITTEES AND SAILING INSTRUCTIONS Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? Rule 60.3(a), Right to Be Present, says that a race committee can once again protest a boat based on information from that boat (as in a declaration) Rule 62, Redress, says that this rule cannot be used by a party to a hearing to contest an unfavourable protest or redress decision: rule 66, Reopening a Hearing, must be used Rule 63.4, Interested Party, says that protest committee members must declare any possible self-interest as soon as they are aware of it Rule 64.1(b), Penalties and Exoneration, says that a boat that has taken a penalty (one or two turns, or retired) can still be given a DNE penalty if she also broke rule 2 Rule 69, Allegations of Gross Misconduct, now clarifies procedures when it is difficult to call a hearing RULES THAT AFFECT PROTEST COMMITTEES Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? The rule that required trapezes and hiking harnesses to have a quick-release device from January 2006 never took effect From January 2011, class rules that change racing rules when permitted to do so must refer specifically to the racing rule as well as stating the change RULES THAT AFFECT CLASSES Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? New rule 87, Changes to Class Rules, says that sailing instructions may change a class rule only when the class rules permit the change, or when written permission of the class association for the change is displayed on the official notice board. So classes have to decide which of their rules can be changed with or without notice, and race committees have to be careful when writing sailing instructions that purport to relax a class rule or add further restrictions. This could cause issues, for instance: when class rules require membership of the class association, and there are races for boats of that class when requiring boats of a class that bans electronics to carry a VHF radio when wishing to allow cruisers not to have to sail with all cushions in winter RULES THAT AFFECT CLASSES Previous Page Section Start Main Menu Next Page

What’s New for 2009? : 

What’s New for 2009? Previous Page Next Page This summary does not refer to some minor editing Part 2 Rules – When Boats Meet Change to preamble Deletion of rule 17.2 Rewritten Section C (rules 18, 19 and 20 at marks and obstructions) Other changes Quick guide

authorStream Live Help