assistive technology for the autistic student

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Presentation Description

This is my power point about the different assistive technologies for ASD students.

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By: hmiller (43 month(s) ago)

Thank you for taking a stab at the use of assistive technology for students who are on the autistic spectrum. It is generally accepted that "students who are on the autistic spectrum" is more useful than " autistic student" as the student has many traits and autism is just one of them. As they say "person first". Augmentative communications covers all levels of skills and is generally not considered "low level". You might want to look into the Alliance for Technology Access to get a better understanding of your topic. Some of the information you present is not accurate. Good luck. I hope you find more resources to clarify your subject matter.

Presentation Transcript

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE AUTISTIC STUDENT : 

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE AUTISTIC STUDENT This power point will discuss five different assistive technologies that can be used for the exceptional learner; autistic students.

Why Use Assistive Technology? : 

Why Use Assistive Technology?

Other Types of Autistic Learners Include: : 

Other Types of Autistic Learners Include: Auditory Learners: Interpret underlying meanings of speech through tone, pitch, and voice speed Kinesthetic Learners: Absorb information by physically interacting with their environment through movement, drawing, and taking notes

What is Assistive Technology? : 

What is Assistive Technology? any item, piece of equipment, or product system, that is used to increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities children with autism process visual information easier than auditory information. Any time we use assistive technology devices with these children, we're giving them information through their strongest processing area (visual). Therefore various types of technology from "low" tech to "high" tech, should be incorporated into every aspect of daily living in order to improve the functional capabilities of children with autism (Stokes, 2010)

Three Different Levels of Assistive Technology : 

Three Different Levels of Assistive Technology

Augmentative Communication, a low level assistive technology : 

Augmentative Communication, a low level assistive technology This type of technology uses visual information, such as pictures, in a creative format that helps improve the autistic child’s ability to complete activities of daily living at home and at school The visual technology of this system will remind the child of what to do daily when they wake up and get ready for school

Augmentative Communication Continued…. : 

Augmentative Communication Continued….

These visual cues help the autistic child to do things in chronological order, check them off, and begin to remember their sequence of daily events : 

These visual cues help the autistic child to do things in chronological order, check them off, and begin to remember their sequence of daily events There is a 2-minute warning for the child to transition to the next activity Child will feel successful when following daily events and being able to check off items when completed This is an example of a low level assistive technology, but I think any tool that makes a child learn or feel success is important

An Example of Augmentative Communication: PCS: Picture Communication System : 

An Example of Augmentative Communication: PCS: Picture Communication System A visual schedule is a "first-then" strategy, that is, "first you do ___, then you do ___“. The "first" activity can be modified as needed to accommodate the child's changing ability to process in-coming information. Once this is done, then he can move on to his next visually scheduled task/activity. It is important for the child to indicate that he is "all done" with a scheduled activity. For example he can cross out/check off the scheduled item, or place the scheduled activity object/photo/Picture Communication Symbol (PCS) in an "all done" envelope.

Examples of PCS and visual cues : 

Examples of PCS and visual cues

Reasons to Use Augmentative Technology : 

Reasons to Use Augmentative Technology The PCS (Picture Communication System) helps autistic children with their communication Learn the wanted behaviors and repeat them Learn class rules Any steps through out the day that need to be learned; ie. Library times, how to get lunch, how to wash hands, follow basic directions in their day Academically: these cards can be used for behavior modifications, math, and Language arts

Adaptive Hardware for Computers is a medium level assistive technology : 

Adaptive Hardware for Computers is a medium level assistive technology Research shows that autistic children who use computers have: increased attention spans stay longer in their seats develop fine motor skills shower greater ability to generalize skills across their environment; ie. Repeated wanted behaviors at home that were learned at school

Voice Output Communication Aid (VOCA) is one example of hardware for computers : 

Voice Output Communication Aid (VOCA) is one example of hardware for computers Children can express themselves with the assistance of any visual representation mode, or visual cues placed on a "simple" voice output communication aid/device Many children with autism are motivated to communicate by use of these devices, particularly by the auditory feedback immediately given as they use the device

VOCA continued….. : 

VOCA continued….. Use of VOCAs have proven effective in teaching a child the cause/effect of language through activities which are stimulating to him. increased the child's use of gestures, words and vocalizations (Marsh, 2010)

What the VOCA (Voice Output Communication Aid) Offers… : 

What the VOCA (Voice Output Communication Aid) Offers… Communication partner interactions increased when VOCAs were used (Marsh, 2010). Also helps with expressive communication skills. It can be programmed to the appropriate language level of the pupil. Can be programmed for math and Language Arts!!

Another example of an adaptive hardware for a medium level assistive technology is the Language Master : 

Another example of an adaptive hardware for a medium level assistive technology is the Language Master Language Master: has been used for more than 20 years The Language Master is an electronic device about the size of an old tape recorder. The cards, which are approximately 3" by 8" with a "recordable strip" across the bottom, are played "through" the Language Master A short verbal message can be recorded on each card The cards are also big enough to include corresponding visual cues (e.g., words, PCS, photos) of the recorded message

Why Use the Language Master? : 

Why Use the Language Master? Language Master used as a model for imitation for those who are able to imitate Is considered to be a speech output device The teacher can record multi-step directions on the cards, one step per card. If a student cannot remember the auditory directions that were given, he can run the cards through the Language Master to hear some or all of the directions Helps children develop conversational skills Good for younger learners because the cards can be set up to be basic words such as, sit down, pick up book….(Siegel, 2003).

Language Master continued… : 

Language Master continued… Language Master provides: motivating and novel approach to focus on sequence stories, a typically difficult activity for a child with autism the child listens to the sentence on the card describing a picture, which is part of a sequence story then he or she can put the appropriate picture in sequential order for the story, according to the message given on the Language Master (Marsh, 2010).

An Example of an adaptive hardware for a high level assistive technology is the Trackball : 

An Example of an adaptive hardware for a high level assistive technology is the Trackball Trackballs come in many different sizes and shapes They allow the child to move the mouse around the screen by rolling a stationary "ball" around with either his fingertips or hand Some children with autism can master the mouse operations with a trackball, and eventually transfer to use of a standard mouse Trackballs can be purchased from many retailers for approximately $40 - $100

What the Trackball offers autistic children… : 

What the Trackball offers autistic children… A child who is unable to maneuver a regular mouse can feel successful on the computer with the trackball Because there are so many valuable software programs on the computer for autistic children, the trackball allows them to click on the correct pictures, build sentences, and help develop some language skills through different software programs

The Last Adaptive Hardware for a High Level Assistive Technology is the Touch Screen Computer : 

The Last Adaptive Hardware for a High Level Assistive Technology is the Touch Screen Computer Many touch screen computers are resistant to breakage unique, scratch-resistance surfaces offer safety for all users They are typically made of Acrylic Track balls can help children of any age with their math skills, communication, and written language skills.

Why use a touch screen…. : 

Why use a touch screen…. Touch screens work with all mouse-driven programs using the touch of a finger or stylus The touch screen solutions are available as an add-on touch screen kit that work with CRT monitors, flat screen monitors and laptops; or select an integrated monitor with the touch screen built in  The add on touch screens are portable and make learning more engaging. Children with autism and special needs children find touch screens allow them to develop computer skills more quickly and easily (Computer Aids, Special Needs.com)

The Practicality of Touch Screens : 

The Practicality of Touch Screens A child can take the portable touch screen to school and home Preschool aged children can use a touch screen The purpose of a touch window is to allow the child to "navigate" and "interact" with the computer by touching the screen, rather than operating the mouse The use of a touch screen can assist a student who experiences difficulty understanding the abstract relationship between the mouse actions and the screen

Slide 24: 

References Computer Aids (2010). Assistive Technology for Special Needs Children. Retrieved on Oct. 15, 2010 from www.especialneeds.com Cutter, Deborah (2009). Helping Children with Autism Build Skills with Adaptive Hardware for Computers. Retrieved on Oct 6, 2010 from www.brighthub.com. Intellikeys Program Overview (2005). Cambium Learning Group. Retrieved Oct. 7, 2010 from www.store.cambiumlearning.com/resolve Marsh, Debbie (2010). Assistive Technology for Autism: Available at all costs and for all levels. Retrieved on Oct. 9, 2010 from www.disaboom com/assistive-tech-general. Siegel, Bryna (2003). Helping Children with Autism Learn: Treatment Approaches for Parents and Educators. Retrieved on Oct. 10, 2010 from www.googlebooks.com Stokes, Susan (2010). Assistive Technology for Children with Autism. Wisconsin Dept. of Public Institutions. www.specialed.us/autism/ assist.