Body Language 2012 - By Maxwell Barrington

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B D Y L A N G U A G E

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Charles Darwin may be considered the earliest expert on body language. His works pioneered much ethological thinking, which at that time, began as a science of animal behavior. Over the years however, it increasingly extended to human behavior and social organization. Because of his many scientific observations of the body, people still consider Charles Darwin the founding father of body language. Body Language and Charlie Chaplin 1889 - 1977 In the 1920s, due to the absence of sound in the television industry, Hollywood brought body language into the homes of most Americans as a form of entertainment. There were many actors that excelled in what was known then as the “Silent Movie Industry”, but one particular individual quickly gained popularity faster than the others. His name was Sir Charles Spencer, better known as Charlie Chaplin . Julius Fast 1919 - 2008 Julius Fast was an award winning author of both fiction and non-fiction. His work centered around human physiology and behavior. His popular book entitled “Body Language” sold over a million copies, and he is one of the first people to bring the subject to the mainstream audience. In his book he wrote:“… Kinesics [body language] is still so new as a science that its authorities can be counted on the fingers of one hand …” Dr. Paul Ekman Dr. Paul Ekman is a pioneer in the study of emotions and facial expressions, and is professor emeritus of psychology in the Department of Psychiatry, at the University of California Medical School. He is the Manager of the Paul Ekman Group, a company for emotional training. Eve Ekman, the daughter of Dr. Paul Ekman, is a skilled facial mimic like her father. Here, she demonstrates the seven major groups of facial expressions.  From left to right: Fear, Anger, Happiness, Contempt, Surprise, Disgust , and Sadness . Source: http://discovermagazine.com/2005/jan/physiology-of-facial-expressions A Few Books Written By Dr. Paul Ekman

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Body Language 2012 Examples include: Emblems 2. The thumbs up sign 3. Common Teen gestures 1. The “Ok” sign Emblems are non-verbal behaviors that are direct replacements for words.

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Body Language 2012 Illustrators are Gestures that are used to emphasize or punctuate an idea. Most of the time, we’re not even aware that we’re using them. Illustrators

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Body Language 2012 Affect Displays are gestures that are used to communicate our feelings and emotions. Examples include: Affect Displays 4. Happiness 1. Anger 3. Anxiety 2. Surprise

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Body Language 2012 Regulators are gestures that are used in order to keep a conversation going. An Example would be: Regulators Tilting your head, and smiling; giving the impression that you like or agree with what is being said, so continue..

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Body Language 2012 Adapters are self- Comforting gestures that are used to relieve emotional stress or tension. Examples include: Adapters 2. Biting fingernails 1. Touching the neck

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Body Language – The Eyes The pupil can adjust to lightness or darkness, depending on the situation. Pupils are also said to be connected to our emotions. Pupil

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Contracted (Small) Dilated (Enlarged) Happiness Hostility Fear Attraction Love Excitement Eye Signals Anger Doubt So, what do the eyes tell us?

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Dilated (Enlarged) Dilated (Enlarged) Contracted (Small) Contracted (Small)

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The Eyes Visual Accessing Cues

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The first time "Visual Accessing Cues" were discussed was by Richard Bandler and John Grinder in their book called… Frogs into Princes: Neuro Linguistic programming(NLP) From their experiments, here’s what they found : Visual Accessing Cues

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We have five senses. That's how we come to know the world. In NLP (Neural Linguistic Programming), we call these Channel Representation Systems Vc – Visual Constructed: Used to create visual images. Vr – Visual Remembered: Used to access visual memories. Ac – Auditory Constructed: Used to imagine new sounds. Ar – Auditory Remembered: To access memory of sound. Aid – Auditory Internal Dialogue: The Inner Voice. K – Kinesthetic: Used to access our feelings.

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Imagined or Untrue Imagined or Untrue Imagined or Untrue The Truth The Truth The Truth Vc Ac K Vr Ar Aid NLP Eye Patterns Looking to the right Looking to the left

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If you ask someone to imagine a blue pig, this would probably be the direction their eyes would move in, when thinking about the question, and while they are V isually C onstructing a blue pig in their mind. Visually Constructed Images (Vc) His Right (upward) Your Left (upward)

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If you ask someone the color of the first house they lived in, this would probably be the direction their eyes would move in, while they are thinking about the question, and V isually R emembering the color of their childhood home. Visually Remembered Images (Vr) Your Right (upward) His Left (upward)

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If you ask someone to think of a strange noise or sound, this would probably be the direction their eyes would move in as they think about the question, and A uditorily C onstruct a sound that they have never heard before. Auditory Constructed Thought (Ac) His Right or His Left (Sideways)

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If you ask someone when the last time they were happy or sad about something, this would probably be the direction their eyes would move in, while they are thinking about the question, and accessing their feelings ( K ). Accessing Our Feelings (K) Your Left (downward) Their Right (downward)

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Referred to as a reflection of one’s inner voice, this is the general direction of someone’s eyes when they are talking to themselves. Auditory Internal Dialogue (Aid) Your Right (downward) Their Left (downward)

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Body Postures

BODY LANGUAGE - :

BODY LANGUAGE - Here, person “ A ” is positioning her body to exclude herself from person “ B ” by turning herself slightly away from her. Exclusion

BODY LANGUAGE - :

BODY LANGUAGE - Here, person “ A ” is positioning her body to in clude herself with person “ B ” by facing her. A much better way to show that you are friendly. Inclusion

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BODY LANGUAGE - Head Tilt A head tilt could mean someone likes or doesn’t like what you or saying; or it could mean that they think they are better than you. (Context is important!)

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BODY LANGUAGE - Reservation In this picture, Alice is showing a look of reservation , which means, she probably has doubts about what someone is Saying to her.

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BODY LANGUAGE - Interest Now Alice is showing a look of interest , holding a slight smile, a more erect stance, and a sideways glance, letting you know that she is giving you her attention.

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BODY LANGUAGE - Hands On The Face Hands on the face could mean that the other person is thinking. But, if the hand is covering the mouth it could be an indication of lying.

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BODY LANGUAGE - Pretending Alice is pretending to be interested in what you are saying. But if you look closely, you will see her eyes are almost starring, and her body is not in an erect position; also a tiny smile is hidden behind her finger.

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Body Language 2012 We use our hands more than any other part of our body to express ourselves. Hands can express: Our current emotions Directions Agreement / Disagreement A language Of It’s Own The Hands

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The Raised Steeple Position This gesture is usually shown by people in leadership positions. Those who use this gesture want you to know that they are “ thinkers ”, and that they know the subject inside out. Rupert Murdock CEO of News Corporation

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The Clenched Fist Gesture This gesture is the Clenched Fist Gesture. It suggests anger, frustration or, on the upside, resolve. Jack Welch Chairman and CEO of General Electric

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The Palms Up Gesture This gesture is called the Palms up Gesture: With fingers spread, the gesture indicates you’re making a request. Eric Schmidt CEO of Google.com

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The Illustrator Gesture This vertical palms movement is called an illustrator gesture. It indicates precise measurement or timing, like a visual period or comma. It emphasizes a point, or punctuates an idea. Mark Zuckerberg Founder and CEO of Facebook

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The Finger Pointing Gesture This gesture is the Finger Pointing Gesture: When the finger is pointing or wagging, it shows you’re pulling rank (but may be losing control). Barack Obama President of The United States of America

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The Open Palms Gesture This gesture resembles the illustrator gesture, but in this case it is not. It is referred to as the Open Palms Gesture: It suggests candor and openness — literally having nothing to hide. Bill Gates Founder and CEO of Microsoft Corporation

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The Over-the-shoulder gesture This gesture is the Over the Shoulder Gesture: waving, cheering and other arm movements can show a great deal of enthusiasm, but it can also make you look erratic. Michael Li-Chen Billionaire Chairman of NCB Insurance

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The Pacifying Gesture This gesture is the Pacifying Gesture: Self-touching, meant to settle the speaker’s nerves, signals insecurity. Heather Reisman Founder and CEO of Indigo Books and Music

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Power of Certainty This gesture is usually shown by successful business people, or by people in leadership positions that want to demonstrate a power of certainty. Andrea Jung Successful Chinese-American Business Executive

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Body Language 2012 A handshake let’s us know three basic things about a person: This person is trying to dominate me, (2) I can dominate this person and , (3) I feel comfortable with this person. The Handshake

BODY LANGUAGE - :

BODY LANGUAGE - This is an example of the “ dominant ” handshake, with the palm facing down . Dominance

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BODY LANGUAGE - This is a picture of a handshake that demonstrates equality . It sends out the message “ I feel comfortable with this person .” Equality

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BODY LANGUAGE - The person on the right is an example of the “ Dead Fish ” handshake. Dead Fish handshakes gives the impression that the person is weak, insecure, or lacks confidence. Dead Fish

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BODY LANGUAGE - The shoulder handshake communicates trust, goodwill, and agreement. A handshake that uses two hands or extends to the elbow can convey care or condolence. Shoulder Handshake

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Seven Body Language Mistakes You Should Avoid During A Job Interview

Crossing Your Arms:

Crossing Your Arms Th is can make you appear over-confident or uncomfortable. Instead, gesture with your hands. That way you'll appear more enthusiastic and engaging. Source: www.forbes.com Interview Body Language, by Jacquelyn Smith (staff). http://www.forbes.com/sites/jacquelynsmith/2011/08/31/interview-body-language-mistakes-that-can-cost-you-the-job/

Playing With Your Hair:

Playing With Your Hair Source: www.forbes.com Interview Body Language, by Jacquelyn Smith (staff). http://www.forbes.com/sites/jacquelynsmith/2011/08/31/interview-body-language-mistakes-that-can-cost-you-the-job/ According to one expert, it’s childish to do this when talking to someone interviewing you for a job, because this body language would probably distract the interviewer, and send out the wrong message.

Bad Posture:

Bad Posture Source: www.forbes.com Interview Body Language, by Jacquelyn Smith (staff). http://www.forbes.com/sites/jacquelynsmith/2011/08/31/interview-body-language-mistakes-that-can-cost-you-the-job/ In a word, sit up straight. Bad posture sends the message that you lack enthusiasm, interest, confidence, and you can even be perceived as being lazy.

Lack of Eye Contact:

Lack of Eye Contact It’s okay for the candidate to look around when he or she is talking, b ut be attentive and make eye contact when the interviewer is speaking. Think of eye contact as a connection tool.

Looking Like You’re Not Interested:

Looking Like You’re Not Interested Be aware of your facial expressions, and don’t check your watch or your cell phone during the interview.

Not Smiling:

Not Smiling You can all too easily appear nervous or unfriendly. Smile, but keep it subtle.

Summary:

Summary Before forming a conclusion about someone’s body language, you should remember 3 things: 1. Put The Gesture in Context: Is the behavior normal for the situation? 2. Track Patterns: How does this person “normally” behave? 3. Study Clusters: What other gestures are being shown?

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The End Body Language 2012

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