THAILAND’S MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

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This presentation tells you about the idiophones in Thailand

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THAILAND’S MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS:...: IDIOPHONES:

THAILAND’S MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS:...: IDIOPHONES by Jasmin Meriam Rose L. Salise

THAILAND:

THAILAND Thailand is a country in the Southeast Asia. Officially it is known as the Kingdom of Thailand and formerly known as Siam. The most practiced religion is BUDDHISM. It’s capital city is Bangkok. The country is a kingdom, with most recorded reigns in the world; a constitutional monarchy with King Rama IX, the ninth king of the House of Chakri .

THE FLAG OF THAILAND:

THE FLAG OF THAILAND

KING OF THAILAND, RAMA IX:

KING OF THAILAND, RAMA IX King Bhumibol Adulyadej

RANAT:

RANAT generic name for keyboard percussion instruments used in the music of Thailand. The bars of the various types of ranat may be made from hardwood or bamboo ( ranat ek and ranat thum ), metal ( ranat ek lek ระนาดเอกเหล็ก and ranat thum lek ระนาดทุ้มเหล็ก) .

KINDS OF RANAT :

KINDS OF RANAT

RANAT EK:

RANAT EK It is a Thai xylophone. It has 21 or 22 wooden bars suspended by cords over a boat-shaped trough resonator, and is played with two mallets. It is used as a leading instrument in the piphat ensemble.

RANAT THUM:

RANAT THUM a low pitched xylophone used in the music of Thailand. It has 18 wooden keys, which are stretched over a boat-shaped trough resonator.

RANAT EK LEK:

RANAT EK LEK a metallophone used in the classical music of Thailand. The ranat ek lek consists of flat metal slabs placed over a rectangular wooden resonator. It is played with two bamboo sticks with padded ends.

RANAT THUM LEK:

RANAT THUM LEK a metallophone used in the classical music of Thailand. The ranat thum lek consists of flat metal slabs placed over a rectangular wooden resonator. It is played with two bamboo sticks with padded ends.

KHONG WONG YAI:

KHONG WONG YAI a circle with gongs used in the music of Thailand. It has 16 tuned bossed gongs in a rattan frame and is played with two beaters. The player sits in the middle of the circle.

KHONG MON:

KHONG MON a gong-circle instrument that is associated with the Mon people of mainland Southeast Asia. It produces the same range of pitches as the more common khong wong gong circle, but rather than resting on the ground, the wooden frame of the khong mon extends into the air in the shape of a horseshoe.

Slide 20:

The image of a half-man, half-bird figure carved onto the frame is traditional, and is meant to symbolize a celestial musician.

CHING AND CHAP:

CHING AND CHAP a percussion instrument that looks like a pair of cymbals. It is made of thick metal that looks like a tea cup. It is played by hitting both metals together.