Church History 6

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By: merlin112 (110 month(s) ago)

This one too!

By: kimoy11 (111 month(s) ago)

dear sir, am from the philippines, can i get a copy for a lecture on church history, email is kimoy11@yahoo.com, salamat.

By: ancilj (114 month(s) ago)

I would please like permission to copy your presentations

By: milvan (115 month(s) ago)

very informative

By: mikecriswell (122 month(s) ago)

I apologize for missing the note about the Church History presentation. You are welcome to any or all of my material. If you still want it let me know and I can either email or send you a CD. Sincerely, Mike Criswell

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Presentation Transcript

Church History : 

The Protestant Reformation Part 2 1516-1563 Church History

Events Leading to the Protestant Reformation : 

Events Leading to the Protestant Reformation Catholicism, Corruption and Control

Quick Review of part 5 : 

Quick Review of part 5 Catholicism is on the decline. Power abuses are rampant in “the Church.” Renaissance attitude leads to learning and a rejection of religious authority. 1455 Gutenberg’s printing press leads to mass communication. The Bible begins to find its way into the hands of the common people. Various men such as Luther begin to speak out!

The Reformation : 

The Reformation Luther’s Ninety Five Theses October 31, 1517 Luther posts his objections to the sale of indulgences on the door of Castle Church in Wittenberg. The Reformation Begins! Two interesting facts: 1. In the 1520’s one third of all books in Germany were written and published by Luther. 2. Church doors were public bulletin boards. 3. Luther’s works were being read across Europe

The Reformation : 

The Reformation The Reformation Spreads . . . The Protestant Reformation begins to spread across the continent of Europe. However, men like Luther did not set out to develop their own “denominations” Their goal was to “reform” the Catholic Church. The “protested” the abuses of the Catholic Church.

The Reformation : 

The Reformation The Reformation Spreads . . . Disagreement with various Catholic doctrines fueled the Reformation Movement. 1. Forced Celibacy of Priesthood 2. Purgatory 3. Devotion of Mary 4. Authority of the Pope

The Reformation : 

The Reformation The Reformation Splits . . . Uniformity was never achieved in the Reformation period. Unity at first came more on the basis of dissatisfaction with Catholicism rather than a single doctrinal issue. The Reformation Movement soon split along doctrinal lines. Disagreements arose between Luther and Zwingli and then later between Luther and Calvin.

The Reformation : 

The Reformation Legacy of the Reformation

Some Major Doctrinal Differences : 

Luther - Germany Zwingli - Switzerland Consubstantiation The Lord’s Supper does not literally become the body and blood of Christ but Christ is mystically present in the Eucharist and aides the believer . Some Major Doctrinal Differences Symbolic Only The Lord’s Supper is merely symbolic and in remembrance of Christ’s work on the cross. Has no sacramental significance.

Some Major Doctrinal Differences : 

Luther - Germany Zwingli - Switzerland Some Major Doctrinal Differences Silence Allows Luther held that anything the Bible does not specifically prohibits is allowed. Luther always had his heart rooted in Catholicism and was hesitant to condemn some of its practices. Silence Forbids If the Old or New Testament did not say something explicitly and literally, then no Christian should believe or practice it. Ex: Fast of Lent is wrong because NTdoesn’t authorize it.

Implications of Luther and Zwingli’s Views : 

Implications of Luther and Zwingli’s Views Zwinglian influences on Western thought. A literal reading of the Bible No more esoteric, mystic, allegorical reading of the scriptures Bible becomes more like “statue law.” The bible meant what it said there any contradiction was a problem with the reader and not with the text. Text had one and only one meaning. Led to severe interpretations and Puritanism.

Implications of Luther and Zwingli’s Views : 

Viewed as an International Incident The disagreement between Luther and Zwingli was viewed as a political crisis of the highest order. Disagreements between these two great reformation leaders threatened the alliances between Germany and Switzerland. Both were infant Protestant states. In 1529 the two leaders met but the meeting ended in failure. Luther thought Zwingli was a mad religious fanatic. Zwingli thought Luther was too enmeshed in Catholicism. After their meeting at Marburg all hope was lost for a united Protestant Movement. The movement fragmented into the religious world we know today. Implications of Luther and Zwingli’s Views

Implications of Luther and Zwingli’s Views : 

Implications of Luther and Zwingli’s Views Implications of this controversy today. The Instrumental Music in Worship Issue. Zwinglian: not authorized therefore unacceptable Lutheran: not specifically condemned therefore acceptable. Sunday School and Bible Class Issue Zwinglian: not authorized therefore unacceptable Lutheran: not specifically condemned therefore acceptable.

Implications of Luther and Zwingli’s Views : 

Implications of Luther and Zwingli’s Views Implications of this in “our” brotherhood! The discussion we are having in some congregations about whether or not we can have “preaching” or “singing” while the communion is being passed. The issue of what the “church building” can or cannot be used for. Can it be used to base a counseling service out of? What about a church dinner? What about a privately funded vacation bible camp? Lock ins? Is it permissible to allow kids to act out the preacher’s sermon? Is there any difference in this and using a PowerPoint?

The Influence of John Calvin : 

The Influence of John Calvin John Calvin - 1509-1564 Lawyer, scholar, prolific writer. Tried to systematize the movement Institutes of the Christian Religion Major emphasis of Calvin Sovereignty of God Little individual freedom No pope or man has right to absolute power TULIP

The Influence of John Calvin : 

The Influence of John Calvin John Calvin - 1509-1564 T – Total depravity U – Unconditional Election L – Limited Atonement I – Irresistible Grace P – Perseverance of the Saints

The Influence of John Calvin : 

The Influence of John Calvin Teaching spread throughout Europe Came to American in the form of: Reformed Church Presbyterian Church Calvinistic churches typified by the Westminster Confession of Faith of 1646.

Other Protestant Movements and Leaders : 

Other Protestant Movements and Leaders John Knox – Scotland Carried Calvinism into Scotland where he was opposed by Mary, Queen of Scotts. The struggle between Catholicism and Calvin Protestantism led to legendary persecutions and atrocities. Was influential in helping develop Presbyterianism which elects its officials from the “bottom up.” Presbyterianism influenced the form of government in America where the power is elected from the bottom up!

Other Protestant Movements and Leaders : 

Other Protestant Movements and Leaders The Anabaptists – rebaptizers! Lesser leaders supported Zwingli’s reforms. Major Beliefs: Christians should not be involved in Government. Only adults should be baptized Those baptized as infants were “rebaptized” (Anabaptist) Heavily persecuted by Catholics and Protestants Some tied to posts and drowned as the tide came in. Many fled to Amsterdam and joined Menno Simons and became known as Mennonites. Others eventually became known as Baptists.

Other Protestant Movements and Leaders : 

Other Protestant Movements and Leaders The Church of England King Henry VIII Affair with Anne Boleyn Wanted an annulment from his currentwife, Catherine of Aragon. Appealed to Pope Clement VII Rome refused its blessing and eventuallyties between England and Rome werebroken off. Church of England (Anglican/ Episcopal Church) started in 1534 when the “Act of Supremacy” declared the king as the head of the church.

Conclusion : 

Conclusion The Reformation had many good and ill effects Brought about the translation of scripture into English Brought about a greater emphasis on scripture over tradition. Undermined the monolithic power of the Catholic church. It sought mainly to reform a corrupt institution. It was fraught with political intrigue and power. It did not seek to restore NT Christianity. It produced many false doctrines. It replaced corruption with divisiveness as denominations arose.

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