Material Handling and Back Safety Training

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Presentation Description

Material handling simply refers to the handling, storage and control of materials in a workplace.

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Material Handling and Back Safety Training: 

Material Handling and Back Safety Training

Many workers suffer back injuries each year, which cost employers and add to the employees’ pain and suffering… : 

Many workers suffer back injuries each year, which cost employers and add to the employees’ pain and suffering… Introduction

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Material Handling and Lifting Injuries are exceedingly painful, difficult to heal , and have an effect on everything you do After suffering just one back injury, you are much more likely to experience another one later on It is important to learn how to avoid injuring or re-injuring your back

Objectives: 

At the end of this presentation, you should be familiar with the following topics: Forces involved with lifting Risky moves associated with lifting Contributing factors to materials handling/lifting injuries Injury prevention Proper lifting procedures Using the Calculator For Analyzing Lifting Operations Body Management Work-specific training requirements Objectives

The Forces Involved: 

The amount of force placed on your back under certain conditions can be surprising. Anytime you bend or lean over to pick something up without bending your knees, you put tremendous pressure on your lower back. Think of your back as a lever. With the fulcrum in the center of the lever, it only takes ten pounds of pressure to lift a ten pound object. However, if you shift the fulcrum to one side, it takes much more force to lift the same object. Your waist actually acts like the fulcrum in a lever system, and it is not centered. In fact, it operates on a 10:1 ratio . Lifting a ten pound object actually puts 100 pounds of pressure on your lower back. The Forces Involved

The Forces Involved: 

When you add in the 105 pounds of the average human upper torso , you see that lifting a ten pound object actually puts 1,150 pounds of pressure on the lower back. Given these figures, it is easy to see how repetitive lifting and bending can quickly cause back problems . Even leaning forward while sitting at a desk or table can eventually lead to back related problems. The Forces Involved

Risky Moves: 

Certain actions are more likely to cause back injuries than others. Anytime you find yourself doing one of these things, you should think: DANGER! My back is at risk! Heavy lifting ...especially repetitive lifting over a long period of time Twisting at the waist while lifting or holding a heavy load. (This frequently happens when using a shovel.) Reaching and lifting ...over your head, across a table, or out the back of a truck. Risky Moves

More Risky Moves: 

Lifting or carrying objects with awkward or odd shapes Working in awkward, uncomfortable positions ...gardening, kneeling, tasks that require you to bend over for long periods of time... Also, sitting or standing for too long without shifting. More Risky Moves

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The further you bend, and the more you extend your arms, the more significant the risk of injury!

Other Causes of Injuries: 

It is also possible to injure yourself slipping on a wet floor or ice Tripping or falling over obstacles in the walkway Improper use of lifting of moving equipment Other Causes of Injuries

Contributing Factors to Handling/Lifting Injuries: 

Poor Physical Condition… Your stomach muscles provide a lot of the support needed by your back. If you have weak, flabby stomach muscles, your back may not get all the support it needs, especially when you're lifting or carrying heavy objects. Good physical condition in general is important for preventing strains, sprains, and other injuries. Contributing Factors to Handling/Lifting Injuries

Contributing Factors to Handling/Lifting Injuries: 

Poor posture… Is another contributing factor. When your mother told you to sit and stand up straight, she was giving you good advice. It is best to try to maintain the back in its natural "S" shaped curve. You want to avoid leaning forward (unsupported) when you sit, or hunching over while you're standing. Contributing Factors to Handling/Lifting Injuries

Contributing Factors to Handling/Lifting Injuries: 

Extra weight… Can be a big problem. Remember the fulcrum / lever principle? The more you weigh, the more stress it puts on your back every time you bend over--on a 10:1 ratio. Contributing Factors to Handling/Lifting Injuries

Contributing Factors to Handling/Lifting Injuries: 

Stress… Tense muscles are more susceptible to strains and spasms. Contributing Factors to Handling/Lifting Injuries

Contributing Factors to Handling/Lifting Injuries: 

Overdoing it… Don’t be afraid to say, “This is too heavy for me to lift alone.” It’s important to recognize your physical limitations and abilities. Many people have injured their backs because they were afraid to ask for help. Contributing Factors to Handling/Lifting Injuries

Preventing Back Injuries : 

The best way to prevent back injuries is to develop habits that reduce the strain placed on the back. There are some basic things you can do to help. Avoid Lifting and Bending Whenever You Can! Place objects up off the floor. If you can set Something down on a table or other elevated surface instead of on the floor, do it so you won't have to reach down to pick it up again. Raise / lower shelves . The best zone for lifting is between your shoulders and your waist. Put heavier objects on shelves at waist level, lighter objects on lower or higher shelves. Preventing Back Injuries

Preventing Back Injuries : 

Use carts and dollies to move objects, instead of carrying them yourself. (Remember that it is better on your back to push carts than it is to pull them.) Use cranes, hoists, lift tables , and other lift-assist devices whenever you can. Preventing Back Injuries

Use Proper Lifting Procedures : 

You can't always avoid lifting, but there are ways to reduce the amount of pressure placed on the back when you do so By bending the knees, you keep your spine in a better alignment, and you essentially take away the lever principle forces. Instead of using your back like a crane, you allow your legs to do the work. Use Proper Lifting Procedures

Use Proper Lifting Procedures : 

Take a balanced stance with your feet about a shoulder-width apart. one foot can be behind the object and the other next to it. Squat down to lift the object, but keep your heels off the floor. Get as close to the object as you can. Keep your back straight. Use your palms (not just your fingers) to get a secure grip on the load. Make sure you'll be able to maintain a hold on the object without switching your grip later. Use Proper Lifting Procedures

Use Proper Lifting Procedures : 

Lift gradually (without jerking) using your leg, abdominal and buttock muscles and keeping the load as close to you as possible. Keep your chin tucked in so as to keep a relatively straight back and neck line. Once you're standing, change directions by pointing your feet in the direction you want to go and turning your whole body. Avoid twisting at your waist while carrying a load. By following these lifting guidelines and by practicing good body/back management, you can prevent back injuries on the job and at home. Use Proper Lifting Procedures

Other Lifting Tips : 

Reduce the amount of weight lifted . If you're moving a bunch of books, better to load several small boxes than one extremely heavy load Keep a clear view ahead when carrying/moving a load. Never carry a load in front of your face as it forces you to lean or twist and upsets your balance Use handles and lifting straps Push a dolly or cart in a linear motion. Never pull, as it forces you to twist at the waist! Get help if the shape is too awkward or the object is too heavy for you to lift and move by yourself! Other Lifting Tips

How to determine if the load you are moving is “too much.”: 

Use the Calculator For Analyzing Lifting Operations Form ……. on next slide Easy to use formula based on factors such as the weight to be lifted, at what position you begin the lift from, the frequency of lifting, and if twisting is involved Simple result lets you know if lifting the load could be hazardous or not How to determine if the load you are moving is “too much.”

What is too heavy?: 

What is too heavy?

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It's important to know your body's limitations , and it's important to be aware of your body position at all times Learn to recognize those situations where your back is most a risk: bending, lifting, reaching, twisting, etc. Then take measures to avoid an injury by using this training whenever you handle or lift materials Practice Body Management

Finally…….: 

Don’t forget the 4 most common causes of back injury Bending Reaching Twisting Heavy Lifting Finally…….

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Thanks and take care