Japan Rain, Snow & Art19

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YOU CAN DOWNLOAD THIS PRESENTATION HERE: https://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/japan-rain-snow-art19 Thank you! Late May to June is the season of iris flowers in Japan. Irises are major flowers in Japanese gardens, some big temples and shrines. Purple of the flowers and glossy green of their leaves are symbolic of natural beauty of Japanese early summer. Irises are extremely beautiful in rain and people connect the image of irises to rain rather the clear sky in Japan.

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JAPAN Rain, Snow & Art

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Seasons are a main theme in the Japanese culture. Flowers are like mirrors to the seasons, reflecting the passage of time. Fittingly, flower viewing is a very popular activity in Japan as most prominently seen in the annual festivities surrounding the cherry blossoms, but not limited to them

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Late May to June is the season of iris flowers in Japan. Irises are major flowers in Japanese gardens, some big temples and shrines. Is now early summer but people connect the image of irises to rain rather the clear sky in Japan. Kakitsubata and zigzag wooden bridges have been linked as a motif in art, literature, and gardening Yoshiko Yamamoto (1973-)

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Akira Isogawa - Tulle strap shibori dress with iris motif, 2010 Akira Isogawa (五十川明 b. 1964 in Tokyo) is one of Australia's most prominent contemporary fashion designers

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Akira Isogawa for Designer Rugs Ayame Japanese Tenugui Fabric, Iris Flower & Bird, Traditional Wall Decor, Floral Art Wall Hanging Tapestry Japanese Tenugui Fabric

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Katō Shinmei (Japan, 1910-1996) - Flowering Iris, 1954 Umeki Shinsaku

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Ella Du Cane (British, 1874-1943) Japanese Iris Garden Ippei Kusaki (1937-)

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Kunio Kaneko (1949-) Folding fan

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Kunio Kaneko (1949-) Folding fan

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Katsukawa Shunchō (Japanese, active ca. 1783–95) Courtesans in an Iris Garden Metropolitan Museum of Art

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 Kitao Masayoshi (Kuwagata Keisai) Japanese, 1764–1824

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 Hidetoshi Mito   Yoshiko Yamamoto (1973-) Iris in Bloom

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 Kitao Shigemasa (Japanese, 1739–1820) Girl holding iris Kiyoko - Bijin and Iris (1910) Toshi Yoshida (1911-1995) Imperial Enterprises

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Hisui Sugiura (1876 - 1965) Hisui Sugiura (1876 - 1965)

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Kyoko Kontani

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Ryusei Okamoto born 1949 Ohara Koson (1877 - 1945) Carp and iris

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Mizuno Toshikata (1866-1908)  Girl in iris garden

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Katsuyuki Nishijima (1945 -)

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Okiie Hashimoto (1899-1993) Young woman and iris

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Okiie Hashimoto (1899-1993) Young woman and iris

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Taika Kinoshita (1957-)

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Taika Kinoshita (1957-)

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Papercut handicraft - Handcut Paper Art

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Papercut handicraft - Handcut Paper Art

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Tatsumi Shimura (1907 - 1980) Iris

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Tatsumi Shimura (1907 – 1980)

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Yuichi Osuga (1939-) Iris

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Yōshū (Hashimoto) Chikanobu (Japanese, 1838–1912) Iris garden 1890

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Toyohara Chikanobu (1838–1912) 12 months of the Year – Iris and Egrets

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Toyohara Chikanobu (1838–1912) Beauties Viewing Iris

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Toyohara Chikanobu (1838–1912) Ueno Park 

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Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839 - 1892) Beauty With Irises

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Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839 – 1892)

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Unknown ca1930 Utagawa Hiroshige (1797–1858) Bird and Iris Metropolitan Utagawa Hiroshige Iris and Sparrow Metropolitan Museum f

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Utagawa Hiroshige (1797–1858) Egret in Iris and Grasses. Met Utagawa Hiroshige Kingfisher and Iris. Metropolitan Museum Utagawa Hiroshige White Heron and Iris. Metropolitan museum

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Utagawa Hiroshige (1797–1858) Kingfisher and iris Boston museum of fine arts

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Utagawa Hiroshige (1797–1858) Horikiri Iris Garden border

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Utagawa Hiroshige II (Japanese, 1829–1869) View of Iris Gardens at Horikiri Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Utagawa Toyokuni III (Utagawa Kunisada, 1786-1865) Iris Garden 1849

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Utagawa Toyokuni III (Utagawa Kunisada, 1786-1865) Iris, from the series Six Fashionable Floral Selections

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Kitagawa Utamaro (1750-1806) Beauties with irises

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Yanagawa Shigemasa (Japanese, 18th–19th century) Peonies and Iris Metropolitan Museum of Art Yokouchi Ginnosuke (1870-1942) Iris garden

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Taikan Yokoyama (Japanese, 1868 – 1958)

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Yoshimoto Gesso (1881-1936) Iris Yoshimoto Gesso (1881-1936) Iris on the Riverside

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Traditional Japanese origami has evolved over many hundreds of years from very basic, ritual objects to the myriad of contemporary designs we see today. Japanese love origami. It's the first subject for children at schools, and if you visit a hospital, therooms are completely full of origami birds hanging from ceiling.  Japanese Fukagawa porcelain vase with Mt. Fuji mark

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Origami (from ori meaning "folding", and kami meaning "paper") is the art of paper folding, which is often associated with Japanese culture

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A folk art, a creative art, a mathematical puzzle, a game-- all of these terms describe origami.

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Some people are attracted to origami for its simplicity, while others marvel at the minds of people who can devise the patterns for such ingenious creations

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Some look to origami as a way to entertain, while others find it has a calming, relaxing effect

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Origami was first practiced in the Japanese imperial Court, where it was considered an amusing and elegant way of passing the time

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Today in Japan the art of paper- folding is as widely practic ed by children, parents and grandpar ents as it was centuries ago

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Text & pictures: Internet All  copyrights  belong to their  respective owners Presentation: Sanda Foi ş oreanu https://plus.google.com/+SandaMichaela Sound : Goro Yamaguchi et al. - Kojo no tsuki 2017

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