Japan80 Kyoto22 Nijo Castle Ninomaru gardens

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YOU CAN DOWNLOAD THIS PRESENTATION HERE: https://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/japan80-kyoto22-nijo-castle-ninomaru-gardens Thank you! Nijō Castle is a flatland castle in Kyoto. The castle consists of two concentric rings (Kuruwa) of fortifications, the Ninomaru Palace, the ruins of the Honmaru Palace, various support buildings and several gardens. The surface area of the castle is 275,000 square metres, of which 8,000 square metres is occupied by buildings. The castle area has several gardens and groves of cherry and ume trees. The Ninomaru garden was designed by the famous landscape architect and tea master, Kobori Enshu. It is located between the two main rings of fortifications, next to the palace of the same name. The garden has a large pond with three islands and features numerous carefully placed stones and topiary pine trees

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JAPAN Kyoto Short but sweet touching trip 22

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Nijo Castle (Nijōjō) was built in 1603 as the Kyoto residence of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the first shogun of the Edo Period (1603-1867). After the Tokugawa Shogunate fell in 1867, Nijo Castle was used as an imperial palace for a while before being donated to the city and opened up to the public as a historic site. The castle area has several gardens and groves of cherry and plum trees. The Ninomaru garden was designed by the famous landscape architect and tea master, Kobori Enshu. It is located between the two main rings of fortifications, next to the Ninomaru palace

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Nijō Castle is a flatland castle in Kyoto, Japan. The castle consists of two concentric rings (Kuruwa) of fortifications, the Ninomaru Palace, the ruins of the Honmaru Palace, various support buildings and several gardens. It is one of the seventeen Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto which have been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site

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The Honmaru The Ninomaru The Seiryu-en garden Nijo Castle can be divided into three areas: the Honmaru (main circle of defense), the Ninomaru and some gardens that encircle the Honmaru and Ninomaru The Seiryu-en garden

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The Tonan Sumiyagura (Southeast Corner Tower) built in about 1603 of the Edo Period, has been designated as an Important cultural property

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The moat outside of historic Nijo Castle in Kyoto

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When this castle was built, there were four corner towers in this castle

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However, the two of these disappeared by the great Kyoto’s fire of the Tenmei Era in 1788

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The second corner tower

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Just outside the Ninomaru Palace is the lovely strolling pond garden titled simply as “The Ninomaru Garden”. The Ninomaru Garden was designed by famous landscape architect and tea master Kobori Enshu (1579-1647). Because this garden is designed to be able to look from 8 directions, it is also called ‘Hachijin-no-niwa (the garden of eight positions)’

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 In 2006, the American magazine Journal of Japanese Gardening ranked Ninomaru Garden 8th out of 731 gardens all over Japan

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Nothing in a Japanese garden is natural or left to chance; each plant is chosen according to aesthetic principles, either to hide undesirable sights, to serve as a backdrop to certain garden features, or to create a picturesque scene, like a landscape painting or postcard

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Trees are carefully chosen and arranged for their autumn colors. Moss is often used to suggest that the garden is ancient. Flowers are also carefully chosen by their season of flowering

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Some plants are chosen for their religious symbolism, such as the pine, which represents longevity

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Ninomaru garden is constructed around a large central pond decorated with a variety of stones of all shapes and sizes,

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and the pond also has three islands; Hōrai-jima (Island of Eternal Happiness), Tsuru-jima (Crane Island) and Kame-jima (Turtle Island)  

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The main purpose of a Japanese garden is to attempt to be a space that captures the natural beauties of nature

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The two main principles incorporated in a Japanese garden are scaled reduction and symbolization

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A cascade or waterfall is an important element in Japanese gardens, a miniature version of the waterfalls of Japanese mountain streams

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A cycadophyta (palmlike gymnosperm) is a distant relative to palm-fern commonly known as cycad

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Ninomaru garden has a large pond with three islands that symbolize Horai-San, and the crane and turtle mountains of the Taoist mythology

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Traditional Japanese gardens have small islands in the lakes. In sacred temple gardens, there is usually an island which represents Mount Penglai or Mount Horai, the traditional home of the Eight Immortals

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The Ninomaru garden is located between the two main rings of fortifications, next to the palace of the same name

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The Ninomaru garden has a large pond with three islands and features numerous carefully placed stones and topiary pine trees

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The castle area has several gardens and groves of cherry and plum trees, which bloom between March and April

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Kyoto was the capital of Japan for over a millennium, and carries a reputation as its most beautiful city. What we are loving about Japan is the attention to detail, its delicacies in special features (gardens, food, shops), the orderliness of the community, and the humbleness and helpfulness of the people https://www.travelblog.org/Asia/Japan/Kyoto/Kyoto/blog-914902.html

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Protection of the cycads from the winter at the Ninomaru 

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Japanese gardens always have water, either a pond or stream, or, in the dry rock garden, represented by white sand

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In Buddhist  symbolism, water and stone are the yin and yang, two opposites that complement and complete each other

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Sakuteiki  is the oldest published Japanese text on garden-making. Sakuteiki is most likely the oldest garden planning text in the world. It was written in the mid-to-late 11th century

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According to the Sakuteiki, the water should enter the garden from the east or southeast and flow toward the west because the east is the home of the Green Dragon (seiryu) an ancient Chinese divinity adapted in Japan, and the west is the home of the White Tiger, the divinity of the east

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Water flowing from east to west will carry away evil, and the owner of the garden will be healthy and have a long life

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The shores of the Ninomaru garden are lined with rocks, the number of which has seemed excessive to critics of the garden

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  In contrast to Imperial gardens of the Edo Period where long stretches of shore line have no rocks, the shores of Ninomaru and other Shogunal gardens are lined with stones set virtually "shoulder to shoulder"

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Text: Internet Pictures: Nicoleta Leu Internet Sanda Foi ş oreanu Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Presentation: Sanda Foi ş oreanu https://plus.google.com/+SandaMichaela Sound: Shigeru Umebayashi - Yumeji's Theme (In The Mood for Love) 2017

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