Japan10 Nikko2

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YOU CAN DOWNLOAD THIS PRESENTATION HERE: http://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/japan10-nikko2 Thank you! Nikkō is a town at the entrance to Nikko National Park, a popular destination for Japanese and international tourists. Attractions include three UNESCO World Heritage Sites: the mausoleum of shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu (Nikkō Tōshō-gū), Rinnō-ji Shrine and the Futarasan Shrine, which dates to the year 782. Elevations range from 200 to 2,000 m

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JAPAN Nikko Short but sweet touching trip 2

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Nikkō is a town at the entrance to Nikko National Park, a popular destination for Japanese and international tourists. Attractions include three UNESCO World Heritage Sites: the mausoleum of shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu (Nikkō Tōshō-gū), Rinnō-ji Shrine and the Futarasan Shrine, which dates to the year 782. Elevations range from 200 to 2,000 m

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The Sacred Bridge  crossing the Daiya River belongs to the Futarasan Shrine (UNESCO World Heritage Site)

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The Sacred Bridge is one of the main features of Nikko. The Shinkyo Bridge (Shinkyō, "sacred bridge") stands at the entrance to Nikko's shrines and temples. The bridge is ranked as one of Japan's three finest bridges Symbol of Nikkō

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The current Shinkyo was constructed in 1636, but a bridge of some kind had marked the same spot for much longer, although its exact origins are unclear

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According to legend, a priest named Shōdō Shonin and his followers climbed Mt. Nantai in the year 766 to pray for national prosperity. However, they could not cross the fast flowing Daiya River

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Shōdō prayed and a 10 foot tall god named Jinja-Daiou appeared with two snakes twisted around his right arm

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The bridge measures 28 meters long, 7.4 meters wide, and stands 10.6 meters above the river

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Jinja-Daiou released the blue and red snakes and they transformed themselves into a rainbow-like bridge covered with sedge, which Shōdō and his followers could use to cross the river

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That is why this bridge is sometimes called Yamasugeno-jabashi, which means the "Snake Bridge of Sedge"

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The Shinkyo has been rebuilt many times but has followed the same design pattern since 1636, when it could be used only by messengers of the Imperial court. It has been opened to the general public since 1973

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Fallen leaves littered the paths

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Cryptomeria japonica (syn. Cupressus japonicaL.f.) is endemic to Japan, where it is known as sugi. The tree is often called Japanese cedar in English, though the tree is not related to the true cedars (Cedrus). Sugi is the national tree of Japan, commonly planted around temples and shrines, with many hugely impressive trees planted centuries ago

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Sargent (1894; The Forest Flora of Japan) recorded the instance of a daimyō (feudal lord) who was too poor to donate a stone lantern at the funeral of the Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu (1543–1616) at Nikkō Tōshō-gū, but requested instead to be allowed to plant an avenue of sugi, so that "future visitors might be protected from the heat of the sun". The offer was accepted; the avenue, which still exists "has not its equal in stately grandeur"

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Outside the entrance tot he Rinno-ji the statue of Shodo Shonin

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The statue of Shodo Shonin and the Dragon fountain

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A Japanese maple tree (momiji) turning colors just outside of Rinnoji Temple

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Rinnoji is Nikko's most important temple. It was founded by Shodo Shonin, the Buddhist monk who introduced Buddhism to Nikko in the 8th century. The temple's main building, the Sanbutsudo Hall is currently undergoing major renovation works, which are scheduled to last until March 2019. During this period, the temple hall is covered by a huge scaffolding structure, but it remains open to tourists. The Sanbutsudo, houses large, gold lacquered, wooden statues of Amida, Senju-Kannon ("Kannon with a thousand arms") and Bato-Kannon ("Kannon with a horse head"). The three deities are regarded as Buddhist manifestations of Nikko's three mountain deities which are enshrined at Futarasan Shrine

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The Rinnoji temple is currently and completely encased in a framed building used to rebuild-restore it, which should be completed by the 2019

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The three, giant, gold-lacquered, wooden statues of Amida, Senju-Kannon (“Kannon with a thousand arms”), and Bato-Kannon (“Kannon with a horse head”). Bato-Kannon is believed to eat the difficult times of mankind in the way a horse eats grass. 1000-armed Kannon are equipped with 11 heads to better witness the suffering of humans and with 1000 arms to better help them fight the suffering.

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The origins of Rinnō-ji Temple date back to 766, when the temple Shihonryu-ji was founded by priest Shōdō Shōnin. Amida Nyorai is one of the highest Buddhas with the power to save mankind

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© R.Schoutens

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Rinno-ji Sorinto column (built in 1643)  1000 books of Buddhist scriptures are stored under Sorinto column

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Colorful leaves (koyo) are to the Japanese autumn what cherry blossoms are to spring. The viewing of autumn leaves has been a popular activity in Japan for centuries and today draws large numbers of travelers to famous koyo spots both in the mountains and in the cities

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Pictures: Sanda Foi ş oreanu Nicoleta Leu Internet Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Presentation: Sanda Foi ş oreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda Sound : Jigoku Shojou Mitsuganae Ost - Hitori Asobi 2015

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The Japanese saying "Never say 'kekkou' until you've seen Nikko"—kekko meaning beautiful, magnificent or "I am satisfied"—is a reflection of the beauty and sites in Nikkō

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Go to Slideshare with click on the book and for Authorstream click on Tv Nikko

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