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by : ENGR. FEDERICO V. CUDIA. Professional Electrical Engineer Chief, Management Staff, Fire Prevention Branch, BFP-Manila "ELECTRICAL FIRE SAFETY" presents Bureau of Fire Protection & Powerline Review Center

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636 63 41 59 134 80 266 104 52 25 44 110 27 89 23 6 136 12 7 9 6 10 25 32 2 6 13 12 2 9 4 0 42 8 1 15 12 6 13 22 1 6 2 11 4 2 0 2 10 7 6 11 6 5 27 22 4 6 9 6 11 5 3 2 151 7 7 6 12 2 16 11 6 8 3 12 14 3 1 1 1469 94 37 145 547 42 160 173 48 31 95 122 115 30 59 23 4437 298 149 385 1103 200 1046 582 207 128 253 445 399 182 100 44 392 51 3 18 214 10 241 48 36 12 30 51 133 9 2 0 ORIGIN / CAUSES Electrical Combustion /Heat/ Bonfire Open Flames/ Cooking Fworks/ Explo./ Sparks Cig. Butts/ Smoking Flamma-ble Liquids LPG (Tanks, Stove) Unknown / Others TOTAL REGION ARMM NCR REGION 1 REGION 2 REGION 3 REGION 4 REGION 5 REGION 6 REGION 8 REGION 9 REGION 10 REGION 11 REGION 12 CAR CARAGA REGION 7 1601 56 47 122 172 45 298 170 58 34 57 121 93 35 8 10 TOTAL 1759 285 147 140 2927 1250 260 3190 9958 Republic of the Philippines Department of the Interior and Local Government BUREAU OF FIRE PROTECTION Fire Safety Enforcement Division FIRE INCIDENT REPORT NATIONWIDE

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Republic of the Philippines Department of the Interior and Local Government BUREAU OF FIRE PROTECTION Fire Safety Enforcement Division 2,927 1,250 1,759 285 147 140 260 3,190 NO. OF FIRE INCIDENTS 9,958

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Republic of the Philippines Department of the Interior and Local Government BUREAU OF FIRE PROTECTION Fire Safety Enforcement Division FIRE INCIDENT REPORT NATIONWIDE KILLED Fire Fighters Civilian TOTAL ESTIMATED DAMAGES REGION TOTAL NCR REGION 1 REGION 2 REGION 3 REGION 4 REGION 5 REGION 6 REGION 8 REGION 9 REGION 10 REGION 11 REGION 12 CAR CARAGA ARMM 2 256 258 89 569 658 3,199,010,409.88 REGION 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 65 9 5 43 20 2 11 30 5 9 3 15 3 1 10 25 65 9 5 43 20 2 11 30 5 10 3 15 4 1 10 25 30 8 0 0 4 1 10 11 6 3 4 1 4 1 1 5 160 15 2 47 84 10 45 37 4 7 12 16 9 26 4 91 190 23 2 47 88 11 55 48 10 10 16 17 13 27 5 96 939,193,292.66 73,616,243.90 62,327,109.32 399,573,289.00 477,949,590.00 62,187,360.00 188,957,570.00 117,654,240.00 113,930,722.00 120,368,250.00 81,695,050.00 238,321,238.00 48,104,680.00 21,607,250.00 150,132,200.00 103,392,325.00 INJURED Fire Fighters Civilian TOTAL

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OZONE DISCO 19 MARCH 1996 160 persons killed 83 persons injured P 15M in damages

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75 DEATHS Q.C. MANOR HOTEL FIRE Testimonial evidence of Ronilo Pacinos Y Ritual, hotel guest billeted at room 306 who noticed the fire at the ceiling of the stockroom at the 3rd floor. Overloading that led to heating of wiring and electrical short circuit. CAUSE OF FIRE: August 18, 2001 Damage was estimated to about 10Million pesos.

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Wiring Design; Electrical Materials; and Wiring Methods INTEGRITY OF ELECTRICAL WIRING defends on the following: Unfortunately, this is not so because of the following reasons: Inadequate wiring design; Sub-standard electrical materials; and Lack of knowledge & skill in wiring methods

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ELECTRICAL HAZARDS Fire Safety Measures

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Check regularly your electrical installations, and have all frayed wirings, damaged sockets, switches, and other destroyed electrical fixtures changed or repaired immediately. These are the common sources of sparking and arcing, which oftentimes become the nucleus of destructive fires. All electrical installations, repairs, and changes shall be undertaken by a competent man. In some cities/municipalities, only licensed electricians are allowed to undertake such work.

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Do not leave your wirings dangling, nor drape them over pipes, nails, or other supports susceptible to destruction or contact by human movements. Never run electrical cords under rags. Cords to portable electrical appliances should be as short as possible.

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Flexible cords should never be used for fixed wiring, nor should they be spliced, tacked, stapled, or otherwise fastened to combustible walls or woodwork .

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Do not overload your electrical circuits by profusely putting extra lights and appliances. Combustible and other flimsy materials should not be placed near bulbs. Long exposure to the heat of lighted bulbs can raise the temperature of proximate objects to a degree of heat as would be enough to eventually generate fire.

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Do not take liberty with your blown fuses by replacing them with pennies, wires on any metal to short circuit the current. Standard fuses are manufactured apparently for the purposes of regulating the load of your circuits. Lighting circuits should be equipped with 15 ampere fuse. Use only approved types of electrical appliances and equipment. Do not improvise them.

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“OZONE and MANOR-LIKE INCIDENTS” could be prevented if everyone gives Due Importance to his Electrical System as follows: 1. Require a Professional Electrical Engineer to design your Electrical system, regardless of capacity. 2. Require a “Licensed Electrical Contractor” to implement your electrical system, except for main CB’s below 200 amperes. 3. Require a “Licensed PEE, REE, or RME” in the conduct of inspection of your electrical system. You have the right to do so. 4. Employ a “ Licensed PEE, REE, or RME” when your electrical system is more than the specified capacity, as the New EE Law requires. 5. Insist on “ Periodical Inspection” of your Electrical system by a “Licensed PEE, REE, or RME”. 6. Consult your designer or a “Licensed PEE” in case of additional loads, alteration, upgrading, revision, rehabilitation, testing, and evaluation of your electrical systems.

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It takes one minute to write a Safety Rule Fire Safety Creedo It takes one hour to hold a Safety Meeting It takes one day to inspect a Workplace It takes one month to put into Practice It takes one year to win a Safety Award It takes a lifetime to make a Safety Worker It takes one week to plan a Safety Program It only takes a second to destroy all in one FIRE

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Thank You and Good Day

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KITCHEN HAZARDS

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Don’t leave the stove while cooking is being done.

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Never let the stove get red hot. Always turn off the stove when you leave the house or before going to bed. Most fires in the home occur at night time.

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Keep stove at least a foot distance from any surrounding combustible wall or sidings. Make sure all gas connections are rigid and tight. Avoid rubber or flexible tubings.

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Don’t pour gasoline or any flammable liquid to start kindling fuel in the stove. Use a piece of cloth or paper soaked in the liquid for the purpose.

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Keep your heat-producing appliances clean. Old food particles and greasy build-up can ignite.

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Never leave your pot holder near a hot burner for this will catch fire.

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Don’t keep or store any flammable substances in your kitchen.

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Don’t heat wax, paints and other polishing substances over open fire.

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GAS (KEROSENE) STOVE OR LAMP HAZARDS

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Do not set the lamp too close to the curtain.

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Do not leave a burning candle unattended.

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Never read in bed by candle or lamp light.

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FLATIRON (ELECTRIC OR CHARCOAL) HAZARDS

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Watch your “plancha” while ironing. Fires often result from carelessness in disposing ashes. Never leave heated flat iron to long on combustible materials or on the ironing board. Do not allow your electric iron to overheat, nor desert them with the current on.

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SMOKING HAZARDS

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Be sure to crush with your foot all embers of discarded cigars or cigarettes.

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Never smoke in bed. This is exceptionally IMPORTANT.

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Never throw cigar and cigarette butts into waste paper.

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Take heed and obey strictly “NO SMOKING” signs whenever you see them.

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Never smoke in manufacturing plants, except where buildings and contents are non-combustible materials.

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RUBBISH HAZARDS

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Keep your house tidy. Do not allow rubbish to accumulate. Clear the corners and nooks of the house as well as the accumulation of leaves in gutters and other parts of the roof. Dispose properly and regularly rubbish, waste paper and other combustible waste materials. Provide metal cover for oily rags, mops and cleaning compounds. Remove waste material from important areas and hidden spaces within the building at the end of each day’s work. Burnable objects such as fire woods and rags should not be indiscriminately dumped or strewn in the house. Boxes should be provided for them. Rubbish burning in small quantity should be done in the stove, otherwise it should be done in the yard away from the neighboring houses. Every smoldering coal or ember left from the bonfire should be carefully extinguished. Be careful that during the burning no flying ember from the bonfire would fall or alight on the roofs of the nearby houses. Be ready with pails filled up with water in case the bonfire gets out of control or spread to a wider proportion. Rubbish burning could be done safely in a pit dug in the ground one meter deep and one square meter area.

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OILY MATERIALS HAZARDS

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Provide a sufficient number of standard waste metal cans with metal cover and oily waste should be placed in these cans during the day and remove them from building during night time without fail. Clean waste should be stored in metal-lined bins. If preferred, standard cans may be hung from posts, provided they are arranged to be readily removed and to maintain a 4-inch clearance to wood posts. When waste is past its usefulness, it should be burned; and care should be taken to keep it from sweeping or other refuse, owing to the extra hazard it gives. Keep all paint-stained or oil-soaked rags or mops in a covered metal can unless they can be washed and hung out to dry.

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Stop, Drop and Roll Stop: Don't run. Running feeds oxygen to the fire and makes it worse. Drop: Instead, drop immediately to the floor. Roll: Cover your face with your hands and roll over and over to smother the flames. Naturally, many people, especially children, panic when their clothing catches fire. Be prepared to tackle them if necessary and to help them follow these steps. If your clothing catches on fire, remember: TIPS ON FIRE SAFETY

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What to do in case of fire . . . It is easy to start to put out a fire at the start; even your mere impulse may sometimes be enough. If you know how, you can put out a fire with a rug, a heavy garment or a pail of water. It will be advantageous for us to learn the technique of putting out the different kinds of fire at its earliest stage, and to have available all times the various extinguishing agents. However, the best equipment in fire fighting is calmness. We should not get excited and lose our minds. Call the fire department at once or Call 117. Arrange for emergency of all occupants, after all human lives are more precious.

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 If fire starts in any electrical wire or device inside the house, cut-off the current first whenever possible at the switch or at the plug.  If the fire is beyond control, warn the family and go to the nearest and safest exit. Do not attempt to save your belongings, you might get trapped inside the burning house. Your life is more important than your things.  Call for help immediately. Phone the Fire Department ( Call 117 ) at once. Be sure to give the exact address.  Do not jump from upper storey, except as a last recourse. What to do in case of fire . . .

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How to get out of a Burning Building It is always dangerous to remain in a burning building. Fires often spread rapidly and cut-off escape and are likely to generate poisonous gases. If you are trapped inside the burning building, do not open a door that feel warm. Superheated air might quickly kill you. Try to get out some other way.

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How to get out of a Burning Building Stuff clothes in the cracks under and around the door to keep out smoke and gases. Open windows, break it if necessary and shout for help. If there is dense smoke but no flame, crawl and if possible, get a wet towel and wrap it around yourself. Cover your nose and mouth with damp cloth.

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How to get out of a Burning Building If there is a panic rush for the main exit, keep out of the crowd and attempt to find some other means of escape. Above all, keep calm. A temporary refuge may be behind any door. Even a thin, wooden door will temporary stop smoke and hot gases and may not burn through for several minutes.

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How to get out of a Burning Building When forced to remain in a smoke-filled building, remember that the air is usually better near the floor. If you must make a dash through smoke or flame, hold your breath. If you are cut-off upstairs, make a rope out of beddings or clothing. You can utilize porch and garage roofs or trees to get to the ground.

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Fighting Fires Immediate correct action gives the best chance of putting out a fire quickly, reducing the danger to life and keeping damage to a minimum. If you find fire, remember these SIX STEPS TO SAFETY . S – Sound the Alarm A – Advice Fire Brigade F – Fight Fire E – Evacuate T – Tell Others Y – You Get Clear

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FIRE – The active principle of burning, characterized by the heat and light of combustion. Three essential elements, fuel , oxygen and heat which form a fire triangle are required to start a fire.

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Elements of Fire

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How to Prevent a Fire Insolating one part of the three components from the other two elements can prevent a fire. It can be suppressed or stopped by removing Heat (with water spray, for example), by removing the Fuel (turning off the fuel, for example), or by removing the Oxygen (by smothering the fire with a fire blanket).

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Class A fires involve ordinary combustible materials, such as wood, cloth, paper, rubber, and many plastics. Classes of Fire

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Class B fires involve flammable/combustible liquids, greases, and gases.

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Class C fires involve energized electrical equipment.

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Class D fires involve combustible metals, such as magnesium, titanium, zirconium, sodium, and potassium .

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Incipient Stage. There is no visible smoke or flame. Stages of Fire

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Smoldering Stage. There is smoke but no flame.

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Flame Stage. There is smoke and flame.

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Heat Stage. There is uncontrolled spread of superheated air.

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Direct Heat Transfer. This is the transfer of heat from one body to another through direct flame contact. Fire Spreads in Four Ways

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Heat Transfer by Radiation . It is the act of radiating or the emission and propagation of radiant heat or energy. It involves the stages of emission, absorption and transmission of heat or energy. It involves the thermal process whereby atmospheric circulation is maintained through the upward or downward transfer of air masses of different temperature.

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Heat Transfer by Conduction . It is the transmission of heat from one body to another. It is the transfer of heat from one molecule to another molecule M E T A L Ordinary combustible materials M E T A L

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Heat Transfer by Convection. It is the diffusion of heat in liquid or gas form through the motion of its parts

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Electrical Common Causes of Fire

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Open Flames

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Smoking.

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Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG).

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Incendiarism (Arson).

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Flammable Liquids

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Asosasion de Damas de Filipinas Inc ( PACO SETTLEMENT HOUSE )

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THANK YOU!!

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