Novice Reach Training

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Reach Truck Forklift Training

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Reach Truck : 

Training For further information on safety presentations email llopllop@rocketmail.com Reach Truck

Subject Covered: : 

PART ONE PART TWO Subject Covered: Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 PUWER 1998 LOLER 1998 Principles of Counterbalance and Stability Factors Rated Capacity and Load Centres Accidents and Associated Risks with FLT Pre-use Checks and Defect Reporting Basic Hydraulic System Part One Revision Questions Pallets and Load Assessments Cages/Corner Post Pallets Adjustable Pallet Racking Charging & Refuelling Procedure Operators/Site Safety Rules

WHY WE NEED TO TRAIN : 

WHY WE NEED TO TRAIN All MHE operators must be correctly trained for 2 main reasons: 1) Safety Operate in a safe and efficient manner Establish a safe working environment 2) It’s a legal requirement All operators must comply with the following legislation & advice: HASAWA 1974 PUWER 1998 LOLER 1998 ACOP L117

HEALTH AND SAFETY AT WORK ACT 1974 : 

HEALTH AND SAFETY AT WORK ACT 1974 The act is largely based upon the report of the Robens committee on health and safety at work in 1972 One of the main aims of the act is to involve everyone at the workplace . From directors and managers, to employees and the self employed in all matters of health and safety. The act also covers members of the public who maybe affected by the employers activities.

HEALTH AND SAFETY AT WORK ACT 1974 : 

HEALTH AND SAFETY AT WORK ACT 1974 Employers responsibilities (Section 2) This section places on the employer a general duty of care to all employees whilst at work “So far as reasonably practicable” The term “reasonably practicable” means that a risk assessment is to be carried out and the risk has to be balanced against the control measures

Reasonably Practicable : 

Assessment of the Risk Time Trouble Cost Physical difficulty Reasonably Practicable A Balancing Act Need to consider the effort needed to make safe – against the cost and possibility of injury

HEALTH AND SAFETY AT WORK ACT 1974 (section 2) : 

HEALTH AND SAFETY AT WORK ACT 1974 (section 2) Employers duties also include Provide and maintain a safe place of work with safe access and egress (exit) Provide and maintain a working environment that is safe and with out risks to health Provide adequate facilities and arrangements for welfare at work Provide adequate instruction, supervision, information and training as is necessary to ensure the health and safety of employees

HEALTH AND SAFETY AT WORK ACT 1974 : 

HEALTH AND SAFETY AT WORK ACT 1974 Employees responsibilities (7a, 7b and 8a) Duty to take reasonable care of yourself and others who maybe affected by your acts or omissions Duty to co-operate with your employer and other people in all matters of health and safety Duty not to interfere with or misuse anything provided in the interests health, safety and welfare Duty to report Health & Safety Deficiencies' to there employer

Slide 9: 

This Regulation states “Every employer must ensure that ” The work equipment provided is suitable for the purpose for which it was to be used It is only used for the purpose it was intended It is maintained in good working order Equipment logs must be maintained where necessary The use of equipment is restricted to those so trained & authorised The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1992 Revised (1998) This regulation covers all work equipment - from manually operated equipment to powered work tools - pallet trucks, forklifts, Mini load picking trolleys, Scissor lifts, safety knives etc PUWER 1998

PUWER 1998 : 

PUWER 1998 Regulation 9 of PUWER deals with training requirements. All Employers must ensure that: 1 Anyone who uses work equipment must receive adequate training including specific work methods used, risks involved and precautions to be taken. 2 Any supervisor or manager of employees using work equipment must receive training in the methods used – so they can monitor effectively. The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1992 Revised (1998)

LOLER 1998 : 

LOLER 1998 Lifting Operations & Lifting Equipment Regulations This Regulation deals with the design, inspection, maintenance and safe use of lifting equipment. Lifting equipment must not be used if it is not: Properly constructed – made from sound materials with adequate strength. Free from obvious defect. Properly maintained. Regularly inspected and certificated – at least every 12 months (if lifting materials), at least every 6 months (if lifting people). Marked with capacity details – Weight, Load centre & Lift height (in the case of a forklift truck).

Slide 12: 

The Health Safety Executive Or Environmental Health Officer May prosecute you for any breach of these duties The Police may prosecute you if you contravene any criminal law whilst doing your job REMEMBER !!!

REFERENCES : 

REFERENCES Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, Chapter 37 Sections 2,7 and 8. PUWER & LOLER 1998 Lift Truck ACOP Organisation or workplace Rules i.e. Safe Systems Of Work

ANY QUESTIONS : 

ANY QUESTIONS Main Menu Who’s responsible for the Health & Safety for everyone on site? Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 PUWER 1998 LOLER 1998 Principles of Counterbalance and Stability Factors Rated Capacity and Load Centres Accidents and Associated Risks with FLT Pre-use Checks and Defect Reporting

STABILITY&RATED CAPACITY : 

STABILITY&RATED CAPACITY For further information on safety presentations email llopllop@rocketmail.com

Principles of Counter Balance : 

Principles of Counter Balance WEIGHT - DISTANCE - FORCE The basic function of a lift truck is to lift and transport heavy loads, this can cause problems with balance The factors that can affect the counter balance are:

Principles of Counter Balance : 

Principles of Counter Balance Using the see saw analogy, we can alter the counter balance effect by either adjusting the distance of the weight or applying heavier weights

Principles of Counter Balance : 

Principles of Counter Balance The counter balance effect as it applies to Reach trucks

RATED CAPACITY : 

RATED CAPACITY All MHE have a Rated Capacity plate – this contains information on the Maximum weight that a machine will safely lift at a specific load centre upto a given height. Load centre is the distance from the vertical face of the forks to the centre of gravity of the load. If the load centre is increased then the truck’s weight capacity must be reduced. So, it’s really important to keep all loads back to the heel of the forks – to maintain stability. BEWARE It’s an offence to exceed the truck’s rated capacity or operate a truck not fitted with a rated capacity plate.

Slide 20: 

LOAD CENTRE A measurement taken from the Vertical face of the heel of the forks to the centre of gravity of the load being lifted with the mast in the vertical position Rule of Thumb For every 100mm added to the load centre. You must take 10% off the maximum weight that can be lifted to the same height Rated Capacity

RATED CAPACITY PLATE : 

RATED CAPACITY PLATE

STABILITY TRIANGLE : 

STABILITY TRIANGLE On a Reach Truck, the single wheel drives & steers the truck. A line is drawn from the centre of the wheel to each of the load wheels thus making a triangle. If the centre of gravity of the truck stays within this triangle, the truck will remain stable.

Slide 23: 

On an un-laden truck the centre of gravity lies towards the narrow part of the triangle. Because this is the narrow part of the triangle it makes the truck more liable to tip over if not driven correctly. If the truck is turned sharply the centre of gravity moves outwards, causing the centre of gravity of the truck to go out of the triangle and the truck lose stability & will tip. STABILITY TRIANGLE

STABILITY TRIANGLE : 

STABILITY TRIANGLE A laden truck as shown on this diagram now has a new center of gravity – this is known as the combined center of gravity of both the truck & the load. This combined centre of gravity depends on how heavy the load is & the distance from the vertical face of the forks. The greater the weight/distance, the closer to the load wheels it will move, but it is also nearer the triangle limits, therefore making it easier to tip the truck diagonally. Combined Centre of Gravity Load’s Centre of Gravity

Slide 25: 

S.W.L. 1000kg

Slide 26: 

S.W.L. 1000kg

ANY QUESTIONS : 

ANY QUESTIONS Main Menu What three points make up the stability triangle? Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 PUWER 1998 LOLER 1998 Principles of Counterbalance and Stability Factors Rated Capacity and Load Centres Accidents and Associated Risks with FLT Pre-use Checks and Defect Reporting

Slide 28: 

LONGITUDINAL INSTABILITY (truck tipping forwards) Exceeding weight capacity. Violent braking. Driving incorrectly on inclines. Undercutting the load. Pot holes. Uneven ground or rough terrain. Harsh use of accelerator. Hitting overhead obstructions Rough use of hydraulic controls – raise, lower, tilt. Operating with a “live” load incorrectly

Slide 29: 

LATERAL INSTABILITY (truck turning over sideways) Load not central on the pallet. Pallet not central on the forks. Side shift not centralised. Turning at speed. Turning with the forks/load in the air. Pot holes. Uneven ground or rough terrain. Operating with a “live” load incorrectly. Travelling across an incline or turning on an incline.

ANY QUESTIONS : 

ANY QUESTIONS Main Menu What is meant by the term load centre? Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 PUWER 1998 LOLER 1998 Principles of Counterbalance and Stability Factors Rated Capacity and Load Centres Accidents and Associated Risks with FLT Pre-use Checks and Defect Reporting

Slide 31: 

Accidents & Associated Risks

Accidents and Associated Risks : 

Accidents and Associated Risks Accidents don’t happen they are caused by:- Operator error Ground and workplace conditions Excessive speed of operations Lack of Knowledge Poor observation Complacency Pedestrians Lack of Supervision Mechanical state of equipment

Slide 33: 

On average there have been 55 fatal injuries to workers as a result of workplace transport accidents. One in three workplace FATAL accidents involve a lift truck. FATAL WORKPLACE TRANSPORT INJURIES OVER THREE DAY WORKPLACE TRANSPORT INJURIES Forklift trucks account for one quarter of all Major workplace transport injuries to employees.

Results of accidents : 

Results of accidents Personnel injuries- sometimes resulting in death or serious injury/disability Social and emotional costs- immeasurable Company costs Hidden Costs

Slide 35: 

If the smallest accidents can cost hundreds if not thousands of £££’s…

Slide 36: 

What does the large ones cost !!!

Slide 37: 

But what about the cost in human terms Electrical Burn (Traction Battery) 12 volt 24 volt 12 volt

Slide 38: 

How would you feel knowing you caused this!!! Struck by a Truck

ANY QUESTIONS : 

ANY QUESTIONS Main Menu What is the main cause of accidents involving forklift trucks? Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 PUWER 1998 LOLER 1998 Principles of Counterbalance and Stability Factors Rated Capacity and Load Centres Accidents and Associated Risks with FLT Pre-use Checks and Defect Reporting

Slide 40: 

PRE-USE CHECKS AND INSPECTIONS For further information on safety presentations email llopllop@rocketmail.com

PRE-USE CHECKS AND INSPECTIONS : 

PRE-USE CHECKS AND INSPECTIONS IT IS THE LAW TO CHECK ALL LIFTING EQUIPMENT UNDER LIFTING OPERATIONS AND LIFTING EQUIPMENT REGULATIONS 1998 (LOLER) Pre-use checks are a vital part of fork truck operations and are to be carried out prior to operating a fork lift truck. This is done with the aid of a pre-use checklist. Any faults found are to be reported immediately using the forms provided It is the responsibility of the operator to carry out the checks the before they use the truck It is the responsibility of management to ensure that pre-use checks are being carried out

PRE-USE CHECKS – STATIC CHECKS : 

PRE-USE CHECKS – STATIC CHECKS CAPACITY PLATE FORKS FORK CARRIAGE BACKREST EXTENSION MAST MAST ROLLERS / SLIDES LIFT CHAINS CHAIN PULLEYS HYDRAULICS WHEELS & TYRES OVERHEAD GUARD EXTERNAL CONDITION SEAT & SEATBELT

PRE-USE CHECKS – OPERATIONAL CHECKS : 

OPERATING POSITION STARTING PROCEDURE LIGHTS AUDIBLE WARNING DEVICES HYDRAULIC CONTROLS REACH MECHANISM DEADMAN’S PEDAL DRIVING & BRAKING STEERING PRE-USE CHECKS – OPERATIONAL CHECKS

PRE-USE CHECKS : 

PRE-USE CHECKS IF YOU CONSIDER A TRUCK TO BE UNSAFE DO NOT USE IT! For further information on safety presentations email llopllop@rocketmail.com

ANY QUESTIONS : 

ANY QUESTIONS Main Menu When would you carry out a Pre-Operational check End of Part One! Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 PUWER 1998 LOLER 1998 Principles of Counterbalance and Stability Factors Rated Capacity and Load Centres Accidents and Associated Risks with FLT Pre-use Checks and Defect Reporting

Slide 46: 

Part Two REACH TRUCK Basic Hydraulic System Part One Revision Questions Pallets and Load Assessments Cages/Corner Post Pallets Adjustable Pallet Racking Charging & Refuelling Procedure Operators/Site Safety Rules Main Menu

Part One RevisionQuestions : 

Part One RevisionQuestions Question 3 Question 2 Question 4 Question 1 Question 6 Question 5 Basic Hydraulic System Part One Revision Questions Main Menu Pallets and Load Assessments Cages/Corner Post Pallets Adjustable Pallet Racking Charging & Refuelling Procedure Operators/Site Safety Rules

BASIC FORKLIFT HYDRAULIC SYSTEM : 

BASIC FORKLIFT HYDRAULIC SYSTEM THE POWER OF LIQUID UNDER PRESSURE PASSED THROUGH PIPES For further information on safety presentations email llopllop@rocketmail.com

BASIC FORKLIFT HYDRAULIC SYSTEM : 

BASIC FORKLIFT HYDRAULIC SYSTEM HYDRAULIC OIL TANK TILT CYLINDERS PISTON GEAR TYPE PUMP CONTROL VALVE BLOCK HOIST CYLINDER A typical hydraulic circuit in its most basic form. It consists of a tank for the oil, and a pump which draws oil out of the tank into a high pressure line. The oil then carries on to the control valve, this can have from 2 to 5 spools. Each spool has a lever attached and these are the levers that the operator uses for hoist, tilt, side shift, reach, etc. If the hydraulic system is not needed at that time, the oil gets shunted back from a low pressure line in or on the control valve and is then returned to the oil tank.

BASIC HYDRAULIC MAST SYSTEM : 

BASIC HYDRAULIC MAST SYSTEM BASIC COMPONENTS TANK SIZE DEPENDS UPON THE SYSTEM OIL SPECIAL NON - CORROSIVE OIL PUMP GEAR TYPE PIPES STEEL, COPPER AND ARMOURED RUBBER VALVES CONTROL AND DIRECT OIL FLOW CYLINDERS PISTONS TRANSMIT THE POWER CREATED SAFETY PRESSURE RELIEF AND FLOW VALVES RESTRICTOR TILT MAST MAST

BASIC HYDRAULIC MAST SYSTEM : 

BASIC HYDRAULIC MAST SYSTEM BASIC COMPONENTS TANK SIZE DEPENDS UPON THE SYSTEM OIL SPECIAL NON - CORROSIVE OIL PUMP GEAR TYPE PIPES STEEL, COPPER AND ARMOURED RUBBER VALVES CONTROL AND DIRECT OIL FLOW CYLINDERS PISTONS TRANSMIT THE POWER CREATED SAFETY PRESSURE RELIEF AND FLOW VALVES RESTRICTOR TILT

BASIC HYDRAULIC REACH SYSTEM : 

BASIC HYDRAULIC REACH SYSTEM REACH MAST REACH WARNING!!! Skin will scald at 48°C Under normal conditions the operating temperature of a hydraulic system can reach up to is 60°C At this temperature you can receive 2nd degree burns in ½ to 1 second It can develops pressure up to 2,400lbs psi

BASIC HYDRAULIC REACH SYSTEM : 

BASIC HYDRAULIC REACH SYSTEM REACH MAST WARNING!!! Skin will scald at 48°C Under normal conditions the operating temperature of a hydraulic system can reach up to is 60°C At this temperature you can receive 2nd degree burns in ½ to 1 second I can develop pressure up to 2,400lbs psi

ATTACHMENTS : 

ATTACHMENTS There are many different types of attachments that can be fitted to a fork truck, all are designed to carry out specific tasks Bear in mind that the fitting of an attachment will reduce the lifting capacity of the truck and can also adversely effect stability Before operating any attachment the operator should have received training on that attachment, which will include any specific risks associated with it When fitting an attachment ensure it is suitable for the truck it is to be fitted to, it is in good condition and when fitted, it is securely attached

LOAD ASSESSMENT : 

LOAD ASSESSMENT Before picking up a palletised load check: Condition of the pallet:- No damaged or missing blocks/cross rails! No protruding Nails! Condition & Security of Load Load securely wrapped to base of pallet! Make sure the load is evenly distributed so both forks take an even weight Remember the Load Centre

LOAD ASSESSMENT : 

LOAD ASSESSMENT Before picking up a palletised load check: Weight & Size of Load:- Is it within the trucks rated capacity Does the load overhang the pallet Will it fit in its place of destination Load nett weight – refers to the weight of the product alone. Load gross weight – refers to the combined weight of the product, packaging and pallet.

CORNER-POST PALLETS : 

CORNER-POST PALLETS Adjust the forks as wide as possible to reduce side-slippage. Apply full back-tilt (if possible). Where possible travel in reverse at a speed consistent with the load. Leave a 75mm gap between adjacent stacks to avoid cup overlap. REMEMBER Metal on metal is a slippery combination, even more so when wet, oily or greasy KEEP YOUR SPEED DOWN.

ANY QUESTIONS : 

ANY QUESTIONS How would you find the weight of an unmarked load? Basic Hydraulic System Part One Revision Questions Main Menu Pallets and Load Assessments Cages/Corner Post Pallets Adjustable Pallet Racking Charging & Refuelling Procedure Operators/Site Safety Rules

RACKING SAFETY : 

RACKING SAFETY Static racking must conform to the SEMA regulations (Storage & Equipment Manufacturing Association) Beams & uprights set to pallet size. Uprights to be bolted to the floor. Beams to be marked with rated capacity (SWL & UDL). Safety locking pins/bolts fitted to beams. Heavy loads to be placed near the bottom of the racking, lighter loads towards the top. Any damaged racking should be reported – structural integrity is dependant on each component performing at maximum capacity. Any damage will reduce the overall capacity of the racking.

AdjustablePalletRacking : 

AdjustablePalletRacking

STACKING & DE-STACKING : 

STACKING & DE-STACKING Ensure the pallet & load is in good order before & after stacking or de-stacking. The pallet should be evenly distributed across both beams. Be careful not to shock load. All blocks must sit securely on the beams & approximately 3”- 4” from the upright. Don’t operate the hydraulics whilst moving. Don’t forget to check all round before moving off.

Incorrect & Unsafe!!! : 

Incorrect & Unsafe!!!

PALLET RECOVERY : 

PALLET RECOVERY If you dislodge a pallet:- Do not attempt to correct it Cordon off the area. (this may mean more than one isle) Report it to your FLM.

Charging&Refuelling : 

Charging&Refuelling For further information on safety presentations email llopllop@rocketmail.com

BATTERIES : 

BATTERIES General observations Terminals: Connectors and cables are kept clean and free from corrosion Cables: Are free from visible defect Outer Casing: Make sure it is not damaged or cracked Leaks: Spillages of fluids are neutralised where applicable and wiped up immediately. Faults: Must be reported to your supervisor Battery changing will be carried out by a qualified & trained person

ANY QUESTIONS : 

ANY QUESTIONS Who is responsible for organising pallet recovery for dislodged pallets within the APR? Basic Hydraulic System Part One Revision Questions Main Menu Pallets and Load Assessments Cages/Corner Post Pallets Adjustable Pallet Racking Charging & Refuelling Procedure Operators/Site Safety Rules

OPERATORS SAFETY RULES : 

OPERATORS SAFETY RULES For further information on safety presentations email llopllop@rocketmail.com

Slide 68: 

All-round checks before moving or lifting/lowering, & always look in direction of travel Ensure all checks are complete before commencing work. Slow down for wet or slippery surfaces and be prepared to stop.

Slide 69: 

Ideally, when driving on a slope with a laden truck the forks should face uphill Never travel across or turn on slope on a slope Ideally, when driving on a slope without a load the forks should face downhill – Driving in this way aids stability traction & adhesion

Slide 70: 

The use of mobile phones & mp3 players is strictly forbidden whilst operating a forklift truck. Only Carry Loads that are stabilised below the backrest extension. (no pallet should be stacked above the backrest) Always travel with forks trailing unless picking up / depositing loads.

Slide 71: 

Never carry passengers. Slow down, sound your horn & be prepared to stop at blind corners, aisle intersections, doorways, when approaching other trucks or pedestrians. Never lift pedestrians.

Slide 72: 

When following other vehicles leave a gap of at least 3 truck lengths. You have a responsible for the safety of pedestrians whilst operating a truck. If stock is falling from above, stay in your seat & let the overhead guard take the impact

Slide 73: 

Travel on the LHS of aisles & gangways & only overtake on the right, if it is safe to do so. Several short blasts is needed when sounding the horn (This attracts attention more) If you encounter debris on the floor – stop, park safely and remove it.

Slide 74: 

Safe laden travel is:- with the reach in & the load “4 – 6 inches above the load wheels. Safe unladen travel is:- with the reach in & the forks low as practical taking into account the ground conditions “4 – 6 inches” (heel) Drive at a speed constant to the type of load & surrounding conditions.

Slide 75: 

Unless stacking, you must not drive with an elevated load and always lookout for overhead obstructions Report all accidents if/when they occur. Never lift / carry a load with only one fork arm.

Slide 76: 

Only undercut only if necessary & keep it to a minimum. Beware of the traffic light system in the APR. Park where it won’t cause an obstruction to others & the hand brake must be applied before getting off the truck.

Slide 77: 

Never allow pedestrians to walk under the load/forks Don’t travel with the reach extended – The sole purpose of the extension is for load placement / retrieval. Do not walk between the mast & the cab.

Slide 78: 

When bulk stacking, always ensure stack is stable & unlikely to collapse. Don’t stack heavy loads on top of lighter fragile loads. Ensure loads are suitable for stacking - top of load is level & can support the loads of those above.

Slide 79: 

Only carry a maximum of six collapsed cages. Only carry a maximum of two stacked cages. Never stack no more than twelve collapsed cages high & two for erect cages.

Slide 80: 

Only carry a maximum of one pallet when lifting / transporting heavy loads. Only carry a maximum of eight empty stacked pallets. Never stack no more than eight empty pallets high in the warehouse.

Slide 81: 

Do not operate forklifts whilst under the influence of either alcohol or medication For further information on safety presentations email llopllop@rocketmail.com

ANY QUESTIONS : 

ANY QUESTIONS How Dangerous is a Forklift Truck? End of Part Two! Basic Hydraulic System Part One Revision Questions Main Menu Pallets and Load Assessments Cages/Corner Post Pallets Adjustable Pallet Racking Charging & Refuelling Procedure Operators/Site Safety Rules

Slide 83: 

Click to End For further information on safety presentations email llopllop@rocketmail.com For further information on safety presentations email llopllop@rocketmail.com

Slide 84: 

A lift trucks rated capacity will be reduced when....? Question 3 Question 2 Question 4 Question 1 Question 6 Question 5 Basic Hydraulic System Part One Revision Questions Main Menu Pallets and Load Assessments Cages/Corner Post Pallets Adjustable Pallet Racking Charging & Refuelling Procedure Operators/Site Safety Rules

Slide 85: 

What is meant by the term load centre? Question 3 Question 2 Question 4 Question 1 Question 6 Question 5 Basic Hydraulic System Part One Revision Questions Main Menu Pallets and Load Assessments Cages/Corner Post Pallets Adjustable Pallet Racking Charging & Refuelling Procedure Operators/Site Safety Rules

Slide 86: 

A Reach truck that is equally balanced by its load is safe / unsafe Question 3 Question 2 Question 4 Question 1 Question 6 Question 5 Basic Hydraulic System Part One Revision Questions Main Menu Pallets and Load Assessments Cages/Corner Post Pallets Adjustable Pallet Racking Charging & Refuelling Procedure Operators/Site Safety Rules

Slide 87: 

What three lots of information would you find on a capacity plate? Question 3 Question 2 Question 4 Question 1 Question 6 Question 5 Basic Hydraulic System Part One Revision Questions Main Menu Pallets and Load Assessments Cages/Corner Post Pallets Adjustable Pallet Racking Charging & Refuelling Procedure Operators/Site Safety Rules

Slide 88: 

Name four causes of lateral instability! Question 3 Question 2 Question 4 Question 1 Question 6 Question 5 Basic Hydraulic System Part One Revision Questions Main Menu Pallets and Load Assessments Cages/Corner Post Pallets Adjustable Pallet Racking Charging & Refuelling Procedure Operators/Site Safety Rules

Slide 89: 

What three points make up the stability triangle? Question 3 Question 2 Question 4 Question 1 Question 6 Question 5 Basic Hydraulic System Part One Revision Questions Main Menu Pallets and Load Assessments Cages/Corner Post Pallets Adjustable Pallet Racking Charging & Refuelling Procedure Operators/Site Safety Rules

Slide 90: 

For further information on safety presentations email llopllop@rocketmail.com For further information on safety presentations email llopllop@rocketmail.com For further information on safety presentations email llopllop@rocketmail.com