motion powerpoint

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physics 1 lesson on motion

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Motion : 

Motion

Slide 2: 

Some Motion Terms Distance & Displacement Velocity & Speed Acceleration Uniform motion Scalar .vs. vector

Scalar versus Vector : 

Scalar versus Vector Scalar - magnitude only (e.g. volume, mass, time) Vector - magnitude & direction (e.g. weight, velocity, acceleration)

Pictorial Representation : 

Pictorial Representation An arrow represents a vector Length = magnitude of vector Direction = direction of vector

Pictorial Representation : 

Pictorial Representation This arrow could represent a vector of magnitude 10 point to the “right” This arrow could represent a vector of magnitude 5 point to the “left”

Distance & Displacement : 

Distance & Displacement Distance is the actual distance traveled. Displacement depends only on Start & Finish line Displacement is the distance traveled , in a certain direction.

Displacement Isn’t Distance : 

Displacement Isn’t Distance The displacement of an object is not the same as the distance it travels Example: Throw a ball straight up and then catch it at the same point you released it The distance is twice the height The displacement is zero

Distance & Displacement : 

Distance & Displacement

Distance & Displacement : 

Distance & Displacement B A C 5 m 4 m 3 m You walk from A to B to C. Your distance traveled is 7m Your displacement form A is 5 m

Velocity & Speed : 

Velocity & Speed Velocity is the displacement traveled in a certain time. Speed is the distance traveled in a certain time. Velocity is speed in a given direction.

Slide 11: 

Instantaneous Speed is the speed at any specific instance Average Speed is the total distance covered divided by total time Types of Speed

Speed : 

Speed The average speed of an object is defined as the total distance traveled divided by the total time elapsed Speed is a scalar quantity

Velocity : 

Velocity The average velocity of an object is defined as the total displacement traveled divided by the total time elapsed Velocity is a vector quantity

Speed, cont : 

Speed, cont Average speed totally ignores any variations in the object’s actual motion during the trip The total distance and the total time are all that is important SI units are m/s

Velocity : 

Velocity It takes time for an object to undergo a displacement The average velocity is rate at which the displacement occurs generally use a time interval, so let ti = 0

Velocity continued : 

Velocity continued Direction will be the same as the direction of the displacement (time interval is always positive) + or - is sufficient Units of velocity are m/s (SI), cm/s (cgs) or ft/s (US Cust.) Other units may be given in a problem, but generally will need to be converted to these

Speed vs. Velocity : 

Speed vs. Velocity Cars on both paths have the same average velocity since they had the same displacement in the same time interval The car on the blue path will have a greater average speed since the distance it traveled is larger

Speed vs. Velocity : 

Speed vs. Velocity You drive from Yakima to Seattle (140 miles away) You stop in Ellensburg for a 2 hr lunch with a friend. Your total driving time is 2 hours

Uniform Velocity : 

Uniform Velocity Uniform velocity is constant velocity The instantaneous velocities are always the same All the instantaneous velocities will also equal the average velocity

Velocity Example : 

Velocity Example

How fast is the plane moving in respect to the ground? : 

How fast is the plane moving in respect to the ground? Velocity again

How fast is the plane moving in respect to the ground? : 

How fast is the plane moving in respect to the ground? Velocity, yet again

How fast is the plane moving in respect to the ground? : 

How fast is the plane moving in respect to the ground? Velocity (finally)

How fast is the plane moving in respect to the ground? : 

How fast is the plane moving in respect to the ground? Velocity again (??)

How fast is the plane moving in respect to the ground? : 

How fast is the plane moving in respect to the ground? Velocity - the last time

How fast is the plane moving in respect to the ground? : 

How fast is the plane moving in respect to the ground? (Last) Velocity…

Acceleration : 

Acceleration Change in velocity divided by the change in time

Acceleration : 

Acceleration Changing velocity (non-uniform) means an acceleration is present Acceleration is the rate of change of the velocity Units are m/s2 (SI), cm/s2 (cgs), and ft/s2 (US Cust)

Average Acceleration : 

Average Acceleration Vector quantity When the sign of the velocity and the acceleration are the same (either positive or negative), then the speed is increasing When the sign of the velocity and the acceleration are in the opposite directions, the speed is decreasing

Instantaneous & Uniform Acceleration : 

Instantaneous & Uniform Acceleration The limit of the average acceleration as the time interval goes to zero When the instantaneous accelerations are always the same, the acceleration will be uniform The instantaneous accelerations will all be equal to the average acceleration

Relationship Between Acceleration & Velocity : 

Relationship Between Acceleration & Velocity Uniform velocity (shown by red arrows maintaining the same size) Acceleration equals zero

Relationship Between Velocity & Acceleration : 

Relationship Between Velocity & Acceleration Velocity and acceleration are in the same direction Acceleration is uniform (blue arrows maintain the same length) Velocity is increasing (red arrows are getting longer) Positive velocity and positive acceleration

Relationship Between Velocity & Acceleration : 

Relationship Between Velocity & Acceleration Acceleration and velocity are in opposite directions Acceleration is uniform (blue arrows maintain the same length) Velocity is decreasing (red arrows are getting shorter) Velocity is positive and acceleration is negative

Kinematic Equations : 

Kinematic Equations Used in situations with uniform acceleration

Kinematic Equations - Ex #1 : 

Kinematic Equations - Ex #1 A car traveling with an initial velocity of 6 m/s, accelerates at 2 m/s2, for 6 seconds. What is the car’s final velocity?

Kinematic Equations - Ex #1 - Ans : 

Kinematic Equations - Ex #1 - Ans A car traveling with an initial velocity of 6 m/s, accelerates at 2 m/s2, for 6 seconds. What is the car’s final velocity?

Galileo Galilei : 

Galileo Galilei 1564 - 1642 Galileo formulated the laws that govern the motion of objects in free fall Also looked at: Inclined planes Relative motion Thermometers Pendulum

Free Fall : 

Free Fall All objects moving under the influence of gravity only are said to be in free fall Free fall does not depend on the object’s original motion All objects falling near the earth’s surface fall with a constant acceleration The acceleration is called the acceleration due to gravity, and indicated by g

Acceleration due to Gravity : 

Acceleration due to Gravity Symbolized by g g = 9.81 m/s2 g is always directed downward toward the center of the earth Ignoring air resistance and assuming g doesn’t vary with altitude over short vertical distances, free fall is constantly accelerated motion

Free Fall – an object dropped : 

Free Fall – an object dropped Initial velocity is zero Let up be positive Use the kinematic equations Generally use y instead of x since vertical Acceleration is g = -9.81 m/s2 vo= 0 a = g

Free Fall – an object thrown downward : 

Free Fall – an object thrown downward a = g = -9.81 m/s2 Initial velocity ≠ 0 With upward being positive, initial velocity will be negative vo 0 a = g

Free Fall - example : 

Free Fall - example If a rock is dropped from a building, and it takes 18 seconds to reach the ground, how tall is the building?

Free Fall - answer : 

Free Fall - answer What do we know?

Free Fall - answer : 

Free Fall - answer

Motion : 

Motion The End