MAKING A PROJECT PROPOSAL

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PROJECT PROPOSAL: A GUIDE, AN AID IN WRITING

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MAKING YOUR PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL : 

MAKING YOUR PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL ECE 516 – PROJECT STUDY ENGR. LIZETTE IVY G. CATADMAN

PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL : 

PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL WHAT IS A PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL? It is a plan of how a study will be undertaken. It describes the steps that will be followed in the conduct of the study or project from problem identification to data analysis. It serves as a guide for the design team or proponents in the implementation of a study or project.

PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL : 

PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL It must be well-written and must be able to convince the person/s to whom it is submitted for approval. It should show that the study or project is worth doing, that it is feasible, and that the proponent can competently undertake the proposed study or project.

CHARACTERISTICS OF A WELL-WRITTEN PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL : 

CHARACTERISTICS OF A WELL-WRITTEN PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL PERSUASIVE The proposal must show that the proposed study or project is relevant and worth doing, that the proponent is knowledgeable about the problem, that the problem has a logical basis, and that the proponent has adequate background knowledge about the problem.

CHARACTERISTICS OF A WELL-WRITTEN PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL : 

CHARACTERISTICS OF A WELL-WRITTEN PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL COMPLETE The proposal must contain all the parts required by the institution to which it will be submitted. CLEAR The proposal must be written in clear and simple language. The methodology must be clearly and adequately described.

CHARACTERISTICS OF A WELL-WRITTEN PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL : 

CHARACTERISTICS OF A WELL-WRITTEN PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL FLEXIBLE The proposal should allow for possible changes or modifications during implementation, if needed.

PARTS OF A PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL : 

PARTS OF A PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL TITLE PAGE INTRODUCTION Background and Rationale of the Study Statement of the Problem / Problem Definition Statement Project Study Objectives General Objectives Specific Objectives Scope and Limitations of the Study Significance of the Study REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE (Presentation of the state of knowledge on the problem.)

PARTS OF A PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL : 

PARTS OF A PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL METHODOLOGY (Description of the design, data collection, procedures, processes, data analysis, etc.) REFERENCES / BIBLIOGRAPHY SCHEDULE OF ACTIVITIES (GANTT CHART) BUDGET PROPOSER’S VITAE APPENDICES (Glossary, Data Sheets, Flow Charts, Comprehensive Calculations, etc.)

THE PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL : 

THE PROJECT STUDY PROPOSAL TITLE OF THE PROPOSED PROJECT STUDY It must be clear, simply worded, and must specify the major components of the study or project. INTRODUCTION The introduction provides a background and rationale of the problem and gives the justification for conducting the study or project.

I. INTRODUCTION : 

I. INTRODUCTION I.A. Background and Rationale of the Study A brief description of the problem situation (what is currently the practice or situation, the existing scenario, the current process or practice, etc.) with supporting facts and figures. Statement of the desired condition (what should be the correct practice or situation, scenario, process, etc.) and the discrepancy between what is and what should be.

I. INTRODUCTION : 

I. INTRODUCTION I.A. Background and Rationale of the Study Possible reasons for the discrepancy. What is already known about the problem (based on literature). Questions still unanswered or information gaps.

I. INTRODUCTION : 

I. INTRODUCTION I.B. Problem Definition Statement One or two sentence definition of the problem the group hopes to solve with an engineering design. Direct to the point and yet specific. The objectives will support the attainment of the solution and/or answer to the problem.

I. INTRODUCTION : 

I. INTRODUCTION I.C. Objectives of the Study The objectives state what the study or project aims to do and find out. Specify the what, why, who, where, and when. General Objective (Problem Statement or the Umbrella Question) Specific Objectives (What the study strives to accomplish)

I. INTRODUCTION : 

I. INTRODUCTION I.D. Scope and Limitation of the Study The scope and limitations of the study in terms of subject matter covered, beneficiaries or users, project design, capacities, capabilities, applicabilities, etc.

I. INTRODUCTION : 

I. INTRODUCTION I.E. Significance/Importance of the Study The proponent must explain the relevance and usefulness of the study or project. Expected contributions of the study to specific groups or individual users of the results of the study or project. Expected benefits that can be or may be derived from the implementation of the study or project.

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE : 

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE Most common types of sources of information: General References Available in most libraries: indexes, reviews, and abstracts. Primary Sources Results of many research studies published in journals or monographs.

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE : 

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE Most common types of sources of information: (continued) Secondary Sources Refers to publications where authors cite the work of others. Books, reviews, yearbooks, and encyclopedias

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE : 

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE Steps in Literature Review (continued) Review the precise definition of the project study problem. Formulate “search terms” pertinent to the problem or question or interest. Using indexes of general references, search for relevant primary and secondary sources guided by the search terms. Start with the most recent issue and work backwards.

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE : 

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE Steps in Literature Review (continued) List in a note the bibliographical data of the pertinent sources. Author of the source Title Name of publisher Date and place of publication Pages of the article

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE : 

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE Steps in Literature Review (continued) Read the selected reading materials, take notes, and summarize. Be as brief as possible. Include all relevant information. Avoid plagiarism. Don’t copy and paste into your paper. It is illegal!

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE : 

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE Writing the Literature Review Introduction Briefly describe the nature of the problem and explain what led your team as the proposers to choose that particular project. Body Briefly report what the experts in the field think or what other researchers have found about the topic.

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE : 

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE Writing the Literature Review (continued) Body (continued) Cite and summarize the common findings of several studies reviewed. Cite other similar designs proposed and implemented, and those that are already commercially available. Take note of the features, capabilities, capacities, prices, etc.

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE : 

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE Writing the Literature Review (continued) Summary or Synthesis Tie together the major findings. Point out similar results as well as conflicting ones. Compare other designs with the one your team is proposing. Point out the praiseworthy features, weaknesses, deficiencies, limitations, etc.

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE : 

II. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE Writing the Literature Review (continued) Conclusion Based on the state of knowledge revealed in the literature, your team could now further justify the need to pursue the project study.

III. METHODOLOGY : 

III. METHODOLOGY This is the heart and life of the proposal. It must be very complete, lacking nothing. Very thoroughly and exhaustively written. Make it so complete that if it were given to other “competent” person, that person may be able to make or perform the project study too.

III. METHODOLOGY : 

III. METHODOLOGY Mention the project study title and its general description or purpose. It would contain the most graphics: tables and figures. Observe proper formatting. Flush left. Graphics wrapping - top and bottom Table caption - on top of table Figure caption - below the figure

III. METHODOLOGY : 

III. METHODOLOGY Cite all the things and materials or resources needed to create the project such as equipments, tools, parts and devices, energy or power requirements, softwares and computer system requirements, etc. Enumerate the procedure or the logical steps or phases involved in creating the said project.

III. METHODOLOGY : 

III. METHODOLOGY Design Criteria Utility Practicality or Economic Feasibility Technical Complexity Innovativeness or Uniqueness Safety Durability or Maintainability Flexibility or Upgradability Impacts (Environmental, Social, etc.)

III. METHODOLOGY : 

III. METHODOLOGY For visual clarity, show the flowchart, block diagram, process flow, etc. of the proposed project. This must always be followed by the text description. Clarify the connection and significance between each process or how one relates to the others.

III. METHODOLOGY : 

III. METHODOLOGY If there is a need for a survey or statistical analysis, present the data gathering procedure you propose to use. Data collection process Sampling technique Instrument (Interview Schedule or Survey Questionnaire) Data analysis All other related activities to be used and undergone.

III. METHODOLOGY : 

III. METHODOLOGY When applicable, cite the laws, principles, and formula that will be needed or used. Present the results of the computations only. Computations will be shown in the appendices. When applicable, cite the software and/or the programming language to be used and present its proposed flowchart.

III. METHODOLOGY : 

III. METHODOLOGY Near the end of the methodology, show a figure of the proposed end result or look and give a written description of what it may look like including dimensions, weight, color, shape, and such; what are its features and label the major parts; how it would function; how to operate, and etc.

REFERENCES / BIBLIOGRAPHY : 

REFERENCES / BIBLIOGRAPHY A reference list which is placed at the end of the paper. It allows the reader to observe the scope of the research behind the paper or to see particular works used. Three Categories of Information Needed for Each Bibliography Entry Author Title Facts of Publication

REFERENCES / BIBLIOGRAPHY : 

REFERENCES / BIBLIOGRAPHY Books Bronowski, Jacod. The Ascent of Man. Boston: Little, Brown, 1973. March, James G. and Herbert A. Simon. Organizations. New York: Wiley, 1958. McPherson, William, Stephen Lehman, Craig Likness, and Marcia Pankake. English and American Literature: Sources and Strategies for Collection Development. Chicago: American Library Association, 1987.

REFERENCES / BIBLIOGRAPHY : 

REFERENCES / BIBLIOGRAPHY Books Ebbitt, Wilma R. and David Ebbitt. Writer’s Guide and Index to English. 6th edition. Glenview: Scott, Foresman, 1978. Green, Hanna [Joanne Greenberg]. I Never Promised You a Rose Garden. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1964. [Scarborough, Dorothy]. The Wind. New York: Harper, 1925.

REFERENCES / BIBLIOGRAPHY : 

REFERENCES / BIBLIOGRAPHY Books Columbia University. The Faculty Handbook. New York, 1987. Corrigan, Robert W., ed. Theatre in the Twentieth Century. New York: Grove, 1963. Crutchfield, James C., ed. The Fisheries: Problems in Resource Management. Vol. 1 of Studies on Public Issues in Resource Management. Seattle: Univ. of Washington Press, 1965.

REFERENCES / BIBLIOGRAPHY : 

REFERENCES / BIBLIOGRAPHY Journals, Periodicals, and Magazines Aron, Raymond. “The Education of the Citizen in Industrial Society.” Daedalus 91 (1962): 249-63. Harding, D. W. “Regulated Hatred: An Aspect of the Work of Jane Austen.” Scrutiny 8 (Mar. 1940): 346-62. Tuchman, Barbara W. “The Decline of Quality.” New York Times Magazine, Nov. 2, 1980, 38-45, 50, 53-57.

REFERENCES / BIBLIOGRAPHY : 

REFERENCES / BIBLIOGRAPHY Journals, Periodicals, and Magazines Rasky, Susan F. “Senate Calls for Revisions in New Tax for Health Care.” New York Times, June 8, 1989, A20. Reference Books “Huygens, Christian.” Encyclopedia Britannica. 13th ed. “Advertisement.” Webster’s Third International Dictionary. “Hidden Face of the Moon.” Times Atlas of the World. 1971 ed.

REFERENCES / BIBLIOGRAPHY : 

REFERENCES / BIBLIOGRAPHY Web Sites Felluga, Dino. Undergraduate Guide to Literary Theory. Dec. 17, 1999. Purdue University. Nov. 15, 2000 <http://omni.cc.purdue.edu%7Efelluga/ theory2.html>. Poland, Dave. “The Hot Button.” Roughcut. Oct. 26, 1998. Turner Network Television. Oct. 28, 1998 <http://www.roughcut.com>. Genzuk, M. “A Synthesis of Ethnographic Research.” Apr. 1, 2003 <http://www.rcf.usc.edu/genzuk/ Ethnographic Research.html>.

SCHEDULE OF ENGINEERING WORKS : 

SCHEDULE OF ENGINEERING WORKS Scheduling is an important part of any design project. It arises in two different contexts: Lies out expected progress in conducting the design itself Schedule for realizing the design. Determine the sequence in which they will most likely start tasks. Identify tasks that must be done sequentially and those that can go on concurrently.

SCHEDULE OF ENGINEERING WORKS : 

SCHEDULE OF ENGINEERING WORKS Teams are asked to use it as an initial design process plan but also as a working document, which is revised periodically to track progress, always with a view toward meeting impending deadlines. Revisions are made in response to new information, to make adjustments and troubleshooting for the design, to accommodate unforeseen problems, and in response to changes in the project design.

SCHEDULE OF ENGINEERING WORKS : 

SCHEDULE OF ENGINEERING WORKS Gantt Chart is one of the simplest, yet informative, way of presenting a schedule. The Gantt Chart is simply a list of all the tasks necessary to complete a project arranged sequentially followed by a horizontal timeline bar. A Timeline is simply a proposed schedule based on your “best estimate” of what the necessary tasks are, when you will do them, how long it will take you to complete them, and what your deadlines are.

SCHEDULE OF ENGINEERING WORKS : 

SCHEDULE OF ENGINEERING WORKS Several Elements to Successfully Constructing a Gantt Chart Identify the tasks necessary to complete the design. Estimate the time required in completing each task. Determining if there is a sequence in which tasks must be scheduled. Identifying deadlines.

SCHEDULE OF ENGINEERING WORKS : 

SCHEDULE OF ENGINEERING WORKS Constructing the Chart The tasks are listed approximately in chronological order and a horizontal time line is constructed. Draw open bars whose length would signify or indicate the duration of the tasks. The bar begins when the task is scheduled to start and ends when the tasks are expected to end. This is where a lot of judgment comes into play! Some tasks can overlap and can be worked on simultaneously. There are several team members.

SCHEDULE OF ENGINEERING WORKS : 

SCHEDULE OF ENGINEERING WORKS Constructing the Chart (continued) Other tasks must await completion of an earlier task before it can be done. Deadlines are indicated with asterisks. When a task is through, shade that portion of the open bar in relation to the timeline. Obviously, things change! If things change, update your schedule but remember that your deadlines are fixed!

SCHEDULE OF ENGINEERING WORKS : 

SCHEDULE OF ENGINEERING WORKS Please see the MS Excel File (for a sample) named Gantt Chart Project. Keep the photocopy of the printout as file. This will serve as a pattern and guide as you construct your own Gantt Chart.

BUDGET FOR ENGINEERING WORKS : 

BUDGET FOR ENGINEERING WORKS Please see the MS Word File (for a sample) named Project Budget. Keep the photocopy of the printout as file. This will serve as a pattern and guide as you construct your own Budget.

PROPOSERS’ VITAE : 

PROPOSERS’ VITAE The resume and credentials of the proposers. An introduction of all the proposers. It is almost what people would read and say when they would introduce you as a speaker, presentor, and the like. Please see the MS Word File (for a sample) named Resume for Vitae. Keep the photocopy of the printout as file. This will serve as a pattern and guide as you construct your own Proposers’ Vitae.