Digraph

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Digraph:

Digraph

Consonant digraph:

Consonant digraph “two consonants that come together and make one sound.” The consonant digraphs are as follows: ck kn th wh sh ng ph ch

[Ck], [k], [c], [ke]:

[Ck], [k], [c], [ ke ] digraph ck makes only one /k/ sound. bla ck du ck lo ck mil k boo k wee k bro ke li ke ma ke garli c picni c Atlanti c

[Ck], [k], [c], [ke]:

[Ck], [k], [c], [ ke ]

/th/ and /DH/:

/ th / and /DH/ /TH/  /θ/    this sound is not "voiced." It is made by putting the tongue between or just behind the teeth. The tongue presses and then moves away. The tongue is thickly pressed for a moment--the sound should not be the same as D.

/th/ and /DH/:

/ th / and /DH/ /DH/ /ð/ this sound is "voiced." It vibrates a little bit, like a soft Th with a Z sound.

/th/ and /DH/:

/ th / and /DH/ 1. this they that those 2. these there them the 3. mother father brother breathe 4. smooth seethe gather rather

/sh/:

/ sh / In English, sh usually represents [ʃ]. The exception is in compound words, where the s and h are not a digraph, but pronounced separately e.g. hogshead is hogs-head / haɡz.hɛd /, not *hog- shead / hɒɡ.ʃɛd /.

/sh/:

/ sh / sh ip sh op sh e sh ed sh ell shut shoe fre sh fi sh bru sh cr cru sh Di sh wi sh ma sh

/ng/:

/ ng / in English and several other European and derived orthographies, generally represents the velar nasal To make this sound, put your tongue up against the roof of the back of your mouth, as if you are going to say /k/ or /g/.

/ng/:

/ ng / bring wrong fang sang young wing gong hang fling rung bang gang long thing song ring thong swing

/ng/:

/ ng / When the letter n precedes /k/ it will sound like a digraph ng . However, nk is not considered a digraph because it makes two sounds. The / ng / sound made by n before k often distorts the vowel before it.

/ph/:

/ph/ Ph is a digraph in the English language and many other languages that represents the sound /f/ (voiceless labiodental fricative). Ph in English generally occurs in words derived from Greek, due to Latin transcription of Greek Phi (Φ φ ) as ph.

/ph/:

/ph/ ph oto tro ph y go ph er ph otosynthesis ph antom atro ph y or ph an gra ph sphere phoneme

/CH/:

/CH/ The most common English sound for this digraph is [ tʃ ], as in church . In English words coming mostly from Greek chi , it is the sound [k], as in mechanics and chemistry . In English words of French origin, " ch " represents [ʃ], as in machine .

/CH/:

/CH/ [ tʃ ] bran ch scrat ch ch ap bun ch ch amp ch at cat ch su ch wat ch ch art ch ur ch mu ch ch est ch eck ben ch ch ug sket ch quen ch ch eer ch um ch ip ch in ri ch ch op ch imp ch ase in ch

/kn/:

/ kn / is used in English to write the word-initial sound /n/ in some words of Germanic origin, such as knee and knife .

/kn/:

/ kn / knock knoll knee knack knife kneel knot knight knob knob knit knew known

/WH/:

/WH/ ‹ wh › is used in English language for /hw/, the continuation of the PIE labiovelar formerly spelled hw. Most English interrogative words begin with this phoneme, whence their name wh -words. However, this digraph has usually come to represent /h/ when followed by the letter 'o', as in "who" or "whole".

/WH/:

/WH/ when white While whip which whim whale whiz whisper

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