Funky Ceramic Shoes

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Funky Ceramic Shoes! : 

Funky Ceramic Shoes! You will design and make your own funky shoe! http://www.batashoemuseum.ca/

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People all over the world have sought to elevate themselves using footwear. In Europe, chopines (16th and 17th centuries ) are an extravagant examples of early elevating shoes. Inspired by exotic footwear from distant lands Impractical platforms were first worn by the courtesans of Venice. Before long, fashionable women of wealth throughout Europe were seen struggling to walk in chopines while supported by servants or chivalrous men. Manchu women were forbidden by law to have their feet bound, as was the custom among some Chinese women. In order to mimic the desirable "lotus, gait” Manchu women added high platforms to their shoes that stilted their gait. ~This pair is beautifully embroidered with a peony motif.Manchu platformsChina, 19th centuryBSM P00.125 Definitions: Renaissance Europe, courtesans played an important role in upper-class society, sometimes taking the place of wives at social functions. A gait is a particular way or manner of moving on foot, East Meets West *The Rise of the Chopine

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Although the high heel was an improvement over the chopine in terms of increased mobility, problems remained. The debris of daily life was unavoidable before paved streets, garbage collection and sewers became the norm. Although the heel could lift a wearer's garments above the filth, it was also susceptible to sinking down into the muck. Inventive solutions to this problem were varied. The Little Street, 1657-58Johannes VermeerRijksmuseum, Amsterdam That Sinking Feeling The High Heel Before Pavement

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Extravagance had become frivolous lending the upper classes throughout Europe and North America to embrace the more modest aesthetic /look/fashion of the rising middle class.Men had abandoned high heels by the middle of the 18th century and, throughout the last decades of the century, women's heels became increasing lower. Sturdy heels were replaced by more delicate and thin heels and, by the 1790s, heels usually rose no higher than a few centimeters. After the French Revolution, heels quickly went out of style. By the early 1800s, flats were the fashion. High heels would not be seen again in Western fashion for another fifty years. Keeping a Low Profile ~Off With Their Heels

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Chopine, Italy, 1580-1620 The debut of chopines occured during the Renaissance but they were still the footwear of choice for many wealthy women at the beginning of the 17th century. Highly impractical, the chopine's primary purpose was to make the wearer stand out and therefore it was perfectly suited for extravagant and expensive embellishment. This treasured pair features silk velvet covered wooden platforms ornamented with silver lace, silver tacks and an upper of ruched silk edged with silver lace and finished with a silk tassel. Chopines are rarely visible in paintings of the period since women wore long dresses that covered their footwear.

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Hintha bird footwear, Burma (now Myanmar), 19th century Golden footwear in the shape of the sacred hintha bird was part of the five royal garments worn by the Buddhist kings in what is now Myanmar. These royal shoes are believed to date to the last Burmese dynasty, the Konbang dynasty, which lasted from 1755-1885. Hintha, or hamsa, birds are important Buddhist symbols signifying purity, harmony and good character. This pair of shoes features traditional shwe-chi-doe embroidery which incorporates sequins, beads and cut glass into its lavish designs.

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Cherokee, c. 1840 The black buckskin on this beautifully beaded moccasin was a favoured material of many Eastern and Great Lakes people. This dark colour could be achieved by using the oxidized pulp of walnuts and provided a perfect background for colourful beadwork.

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Karen Kain Karen Kain is perhaps Canada's most famous ballerina. She began studying ballet at the National Ballet School of Canada at the age of 11 and by 1971 was the principal dancer for the National Ballet of Canada. Today she is the company's Artistic Director. Ms. Kain donated this pair of well-worn Freed pointe shoes to the Museum in 1993.

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Sketch your designs from the side, top, front, and back. You will also decide if you are going to use mixed media with clay, or clay alone  (for example, you could use feathers, raffia, etc.)

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In your sketchbook come up with a list of random ideas for shoes, see what you can come up with... shoes to cook in, shoes to go around the world in, shoes to wear in prison, shoes to wear on the ceiling, shoes for a first date or when you want to break up with someone, shoes to hold water, shoes with a mind of their own, shoes that sing, shoes that float, shoes for the depressed, shoes for a rhino, shoes to wear to a barbeque, shoes for a dog trainer, etc., etc., etc.

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Procedures: Brainstorm on kinds of shoes …In your sketchbook come up with a list of random ideas for shoes, see what you can come up with... shoes to cook in, shoes to go around the world in, shoes to wear in prison, shoes to wear on the ceiling, shoes for a first date or when you want to break up with someone, shoes to hold water, shoes with a mind of their own, shoes that sing, shoes that float, shoes for the depressed, shoes for a rhino, shoes to wear to a barbeque, shoes for a dog trainer, etc., etc., etc.  -choose 1-2 2. Draw those shoes from all sides (top, sides, back & front)….you can choose which one you will create in clay. 3. Using a rolling pin and wooden slab sticks, roll out an even slab of clay. Keep your shoe in the bag while you work! 4. Cut the sole of your shoe from this slab. (Hint: no matter what the shoe looks like, the soles will be the same basic shape) Use your own shoe to cut a basic shape and then trim it to be no more than 10-11 inches long and 4-5 inches wide. ~To make the sides those should also be slabs you attach with slipping and scoring, you can trim them to any shape or size..make two at the same time before attaching if both are to be the same. 5. Form the heel of the shoe using slab, coil, or pinching methods. Remember the heel has to support your shoe. The heel should be no higher than 3” and may require the front to be built up as well. 6. Attach heel to upside down sole, then place shoe right side up. Support arch of shoe if needed with wads of newspaper. You can use this trick inside the shoe if it needs support there as well which it will most likely need. 7. Use additive technique to add at least five 3-D details. You may choose to create some subtractive qualities but make sure they are somewhat deeply carved so paint won’t cover them later. Slip and score sections together! 8. Use a sponge to smooth all rough areas before letting shoe dry. Add any desired textures 9. Paint and add any additional embellishments. 10. Write about meaning of shoe - Self Assessment ~EVERYDAY wrap your shoe in a damp paper towel and plastic bag, tie it once, squeeze out the air and tuck the handles under the shoe on a tray to keep ALL air out!

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