bethel Expectations for EFL Teachers in Japan

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Expectations for Native-SpeakingEFL Teachers in Japan : 

Expectations for Native-SpeakingEFL Teachers in Japan Christina Bethel ENGL 6528 7 April 2008

Expectations for Native-SpeakingEFL Teachers in Japan : 

Expectations for Native-SpeakingEFL Teachers in Japan Teacher Credentials Curriculum Requirements Learner Expectations Administrative Expectations Conclusion

Preferred Teacher Credentials : 

Preferred Teacher Credentials Full-time—Universities Highly competitive Masters in Applied Linguistics Experience Full-time—JET Government-funded Bachelors degree Younger than 40

Curriculum Requirements : 

Curriculum Requirements University Some freedom in text choice and curriculum Secondary Transition to from grammar-translation to communicative methods Focus on text

Curriculum Requirements : 

Curriculum Requirements Integration of culture Expected in all curricula Teachers introduce culture, but not enough Rely on “spontaneous” instruction Some don’t recognize benefit

Curriculum Requirements : 

Curriculum Requirements Student Evaluation Writing

Learner Perspectives : 

Learner Perspectives English as an International Language Student comfort level Students prefer native speakers mostly for culture “benefits,” if at all

Conclusion : 

Conclusion No scientific advantage to native speakers ALT seems sufficient to address culture Linguistic and teaching competence most important

Questions? : 

Questions? Please post questions and comments on the class discussion board. Thank you!

For More Information : 

For More Information Browne, C. M. and Wada, M. (1998). Current Issues in High School English Teaching in Japan: An Exploratory Survey. Language, Culture, and Curriculum, 11(1), 97-112. Retrieved from CSA Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (9900240). Fujita, M. and Sakamoto, M. (1998). EFL Composition Evaluations by Native EFL and Japanese EFL Instructors. Annual Meeting of the Japan Association for Language Teaching (Hamamatsu, Japan, October 1997). Retrieved from ERIC (ED460639). Fukumura, A. (1993). Qualifications of Language Teachers and English as an International Language. TESL Reporter, 26(1), 29-34. Retrieved from ERIC. Jeon, M. and Lee, J. (2006). Hiring Native Speaking English Teachers in East Asian Countries. English Today, 22(4), 53-58. Retrieved from CSA Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts. Kachi, R and Choon-hwa, L. A Tandem of Native and Nonnative Teachers: Voices from Japanese and American Teachers in the EFL Classroom in Japan. Annual International Conference on Language Teacher Education. Minneapolis, MN, May 17-19, 2001. Retrieved from ERIC Database (ED478746). Lessard-Clouston, M. (1998). Perspectives on Language Learning and Teaching in Japan—an Introduction. Language, Culture, and Curriculum, 11(1), 1-8. Retrieved from CSA Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts. Moussu, L. M. (2002). English as a Second Language Students’ Reactions to Nonnative English Speaking Teachers (Master of Arts Thesis, Brigham Young University, 2000). Retrieved from ERIC (ED468879). Stapleton, P. (2000). Culture’s Role in TEFL—an Attitude Survey in Japan. Language, Culture, and Curriculum, 13(3), 291-305. Retrieved from CSA Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (200110986). Torpey, M. J. (2006). A Case Study of Conflict in an Educational Workplace: Managing Personal and Cultural Differences. Teachers College Record, 108(12), 2523-2549. Retrieved from ERIC Database (EJ747142). Usuki, M. (2001). From the Learners’ Perspectives: The Needs for Awareness Raising Towards Autonomy and Roles of the Teachers. Research Report (Hokukiku University). 12 pgs. Retrieved from ERIC (ED455694).

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