Physical, Thermal and Spectroscopic Characterization of m-Toluic Acid

Views:
 
     
 

Presentation Description

The aim of present study was to evaluate the impact of biofield treatment on physical, thermal and spectroscopic properties of MTA.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

slide 1:

Volume 4 • Issue 4 • 1000178 Biochem Pharmacol ISSN:2167-0501 BCPC an open access journal Research Article Open Access Biochemistry Pharmacology: Open Access Biochemistry Pharmacology: Open Access ISSN: 2167-0501 Trivedi et al. Biochem Pharmacol Los Angel 2015 4:4 http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/2167-0501.1000178 Abstract m-toluic acid MTA is widely used in manufacturing of dyes pharmaceuticals polymer stabilizers and insect repellents. The aim of present study was to evaluate the impact of biofeld treatment on physical thermal and spectroscopic properties of MTA. MTA sample was divided into two groups that served as treated and control. The treated group received Mr. Trivedi’s biofeld treatment. Subsequently the control and treated samples were evaluated using X-ray diffraction XRD surface area analyser differential scanning calorimetry DSC thermogravimetric analysis TGA Fourier transform infrared FT-IR and ultraviolet-visible UV-Vis spectroscopy. XRD result showed a decrease in crystallite size in treated samples i.e. 42.86 in MTA along with the increase in peak intensity as compared to control. However surface area analysis showed an increase in surface area of 107.14 in treated MTA sample as compared to control. Furthermore DSC analysis results showed that the latent heat of fusion was considerably reduced by 40.32 whereas the melting temperature was increased 2.23 in treated MTA sample as compared to control. The melting point of treated MTA was found to be 116.04°C as compared to control 113.51°C sample. Moreover TGA/DTG studies showed that the control sample lost 56.25 of its weight whereas in treated MTA it was found 58.60. Also T max temperature at which sample lost maximum of its weight was decreased by 1.97 in treated MTA sample as compared to control. It indicates that the vaporisation temperature of treated MTA sample might decrease as compared to control. The FT-IR and UV-Vis spectra did not show any signifcant change in spectral properties of treated MTA sample as compared to control. These fndings suggest that biofeld treatment has signifcantly altered the physical and thermal properties of m-toluic acid which could make them more useful as a chemical intermediate. Physical Thermal and Spectroscopic Characterization of m-Toluic Acid: an Impact of Biofield Treatment Mahendra Kumar Trivedi 1 Alice Branton 1 Dahryn Trivedi 1 Gopal Nayak 1 Ragini Singh 2 and Snehasis Jana 2 1 Trivedi Global Inc. 10624 S Eastern Avenue Suite A-969 Henderson NV 89052 USA 2 Trivedi Science Research Laboratory Pvt. Ltd. Hall-A Chinar Mega Mall Chinar Fortune City Hoshangabad Rd Bhopal- 462026 Madhya Pradesh India Corresponding author: Snehasis Jana Trivedi Science Research Laboratory Pvt. Ltd. Hall-A Chinar Mega Mall Chinar Fortune City Hoshangabad Rd Bhopal- 462026 Madhya Pradesh India Tel: +91-755-666-0006 E-mail: publicationtrivedisrl.com Received July 25 2015 Accepted August 03 2015 Published August 06 2015 Citation: Trivedi MK Branton A Trivedi D Nayak G Singh R 2015 Physical Thermal and Spectroscopic Characterization of m-Toluic Acid: an Impact of Biofeld Treatmentr. Biochem Pharmacol Los Angel 4: 178. doi: 10.4172/2167-0501.1000178 Copyright: © 2015 Trivedi MK et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use distribution and reproduction in any medium provided the original author and source are credited. Keywords: Biofeld treatment m-Toluic acid X-ray difraction study Surface area analysis Diferential scanning calorimetry Termogravimetric analysis Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy Introduction Te m-toluic acid MTA is a benzoic acid derivative having a foral honey odour. Benzoic acid occurs naturally in many plants and its name was also derived from a plant source i.e. Gum benzoin. Although it is used as precursor to plasticizers preservatives such as sodium benzoate it also has wide application in many pharmaceutical preparations meant for treatment of fungal skin diseases topical antiseptics expectorants analgesics and decongestants 12. Te benzoic acid derivatives are also very useful due to their bacteriostatic and fragrant properties. Tey are used as intermediate in the production of various pharmaceuticals having analgesic antirheumatic and vasodilator properties 3. MTA is used as a chemical intermediate in manufacturing of insect repellent and plastic stabilizer in the chemical industry. It is also used in the production of various chemicals like 3-carboxybenzaldehyde 3-benzoylphenylacetic acid 3-methylbenzophenone and NN-diethyl- 3-methylbenzamide etc. 45. It is a main component of NN-diethyl- m-toluamide commonly known as DEET which is frst insect repellent that can be applied to skin or clothing and provide protection against mosquitoes and other biting insects 6. MTA is used as intermediate in various chemical reactions hence its rate of reaction plays a crucial role. It was reported previously that any alteration in crystallite size and surface area can afect the kinetics of reaction 7. Moreover the rate kinetics of any chemical reaction also depends on the thermal properties of the intermediate chemical compound i.e. latent heat of fusion vaporisation temperature decomposition temperature etc. 8. Afer considering the properties and applications of MTA authors wanted to investigate an economically safe approach that could be benefcial to modify their physical thermal and spectral properties. Te concept of human bioenergy has its origin thousands of years back. It is scientifcally termed as the biologically produced electromagnetic and subtle energy feld that provides regulatory and communication functions within the human organs 9. It generates through internal physiological processes such as blood fow brain and heart function etc. Nowadays many biofeld therapies are in practice for their possible therapeutic potentials such as enhanced personal well-being improved functional ability of arthritis patient decreased pain and anxiety 10-12. Te practitioners of these therapy claim that the healers channel supraphysical energy and intentionally direct this energy towards target 13. Tus a human has the ability to harness the energy from environment or universe and can transmit into any living or non-living objects. Te objects always receive the energy and responding into useful way that is called biofeld energy and the process is known as biofeld treatment. Mr. Trivedi’s biofeld treatment is well known and signifcantly studied in diferent felds such as microbiology 14-16 agriculture 1718 and biotechnology 19. Exposure to biofeld energy caused an increase in medicinal property growth and anatomical characteristics

slide 2:

Citation: Trivedi MK Branton A Trivedi D Nayak G Singh R 2015 Physical Thermal and Spectroscopic Characterization of m-Toluic Acid: an Impact of Biofeld Treatmentr. Biochem Pharmacol Los Angel 4: 178. doi:10.4172/2167-0501.1000178 Page 2 of 8 Volume 4 • Issue 4 • 1000178 Biochem Pharmacol Los Angel ISSN:2167-0501 BCPC an open access journal of ashwagandha 20. Recently the impact of biofeld treatment on atomic crystalline and powder characteristics as well as spectroscopic characters of diferent materials was studied 2122. Te biofeld treatment had increased the particle size by six fold and enhanced the crystallite size by two fold in zinc powder 23. Hence based on the outstanding results obtained afer biofeld treatment on diferent materials and considering the pharmaceutical applications of MTA the present study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of biofeld treatment on physical thermal and spectroscopic properties of MTA. Materials and Methods m-toluic acid MTA was procured from S D Fine Chemicals Pvt. Ltd. India. Te sample was divided into two parts one was kept as a control while other was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofeld treatment and coded as treated sample. Te treatment sample in sealed pack was handed over to Mr. Trivedi for biofeld treatment under standard laboratory conditions. Mr. Trivedi provided the treatment through his energy transmission process to the treated group without touching the sample. Te biofeld treated sample was returned in the similarly sealed condition for further characterization using XRD surface area analyser DSC TGA FT-IR and UV-Vis spectroscopic techniques. X-ray difraction XRD study XRD analysis was carried out on Phillips Holland PW 1710 X-ray difractometer system which had a copper anode with nickel flter. Te radiation of wavelength used by the XRD system was 1.54056 Å. Te data obtained were in the form of a chart of 2θ vs. intensity and a detailed table containing peak intensity counts d value Å peak width θ ° relative intensity etc. Te crystallite size G was calculated by using formula: G kλ/bCosθ Here λ is the wavelength of radiation used b is full width half maximum FWHM of peaks and k is the equipment constant 0.94. However percent change in crystallite size was calculated using the following equation: Percent change in crystallite size G t -G c /G c ×100 Where G c and G t are crystallite size of control and treated powder samples respectively. Surface area analysis Te surface area was measured by the Surface area analyser Smart SORB 90 based on Brunauer–Emmett–Teller BET. Percent changes in surface area were calculated using following equation: Treated Control Control S -S changeinsurfacearea 100 S × Where S Control and S Treated are the surface area of control and treated samples respectively. Diferential scanning calorimetry DSC study For studies related to melting temperature and latent heat of fusion of MTA Diferential Scanning Calorimeter DSC of Perkin Elmer/ Pyris-1 USA with a heating rate of 10°C/min under air atmosphere and fow rate of 5 ml/min was used. Melting temperature and latent heat of fusion were obtained from the DSC curve. Percent change in latent heat of fusion was calculated using following equations: Treated Control Control ÄH ÄH changein Latent heat of fusion 100 ÄH − × Where ΔH Control and ΔH Treated are the latent heat of fusion of control and treated samples respectively. Similarly percent change in melting point was also calculated to observe the diference in thermal properties of treated MTA sample as compared to control. Termogravimetric analysis/ Derivative Termogravimetry TGA/DTG Termal stability of control and treated sample of MTA was analysed by using Mettler Toledo simultaneous Termogravimetric analyser TGA/DTG. Te samples were heated from room temperature to 400°C with a heating rate of 5°C/min under air atmosphere. From TGA curve onset temperature T onset temperature at which sample start losing weight and from DTG curve T max temperature at which sample lost its maximum weight were recorded. Percent change in temperature at which maximum weight loss occur in sample was calculated using following equation: change in T max T max treated − T max control / T max control × 100 Where T max control and T max treated are the temperature at which maximum weight loss occurs in control and treated sample respectively. Percent change in onset peak temperature was calculated using following equation: change in onset peak temperature T onset T onset treated −T onset control / T onset control ×100 Where T onset control and T onset treated are onset peak temperature in control and treated sample respectively. Spectroscopic studies For determination of spectroscopic characters the treated sample was divided into two groups i.e. T1 and T2. Both treated groups were analysed for their spectral characteristics using FT-IR and UV-Vis spectroscopy as compared to control MTA sample. FT-IR spectroscopic characterization FT-IR spectra were recorded on Shimadzu’s Fourier transform infrared spectrometer Japan with the frequency range of 4000-500 cm -1 . Te samples are prepared by grinding the dry blended powders of control and treated MTA with powdered KBr and then compressed to form discs. Te FT-IR spectroscopic analysis of MTA control T1 and T2 were carried out to evaluate the impact of biofeld treatment at atomic and molecular level like bond strength stability rigidity of structure etc. 24. UV-Vis spectroscopic analysis Te UV-Vis spectral analysis was measured using Shimadzu UV-2400 PC series spectrophotometer over a wavelength range of 200-400 nm with 1 cm quartz cell and a slit width of 2.0 nm. Tis analysis was performed to evaluate the efect of biofeld treatment on the structural property of MTA sample. Te UV-Vis spectroscopy gives the preliminary information related to the skeleton of chemical structure and possible arrangement of functional groups. With UV- Vis spectroscopy it is possible to investigate electron transfers between orbitals or bands of atoms ions and molecules existing in the gaseous liquid and solid phase 24.

slide 3:

Citation: Trivedi MK Branton A Trivedi D Nayak G Singh R 2015 Physical Thermal and Spectroscopic Characterization of m-Toluic Acid: an Impact of Biofeld Treatmentr. Biochem Pharmacol Los Angel 4: 178. doi:10.4172/2167-0501.1000178 Page 3 of 8 Volume 4 • Issue 4 • 1000178 Biochem Pharmacol Los Angel ISSN:2167-0501 BCPC an open access journal Results and Discussion X-ray difraction X-ray diffraction study was conducted to study the crystalline nature of the control and treated sample of MTA. XRD diffractograms of control and treated samples of MTA are shown in Figure 1. The XRD diffractogram of control MTA showed an intense crystalline peak at 2θ equals to 14.00°. The single intense peak indicated the crystalline nature of MTA. However the XRD diffractogram of treated MTA showed the crystalline peak at 2θ equals to 13.90°. The treated sample peak showed high intensity as compared to control that indicated that crystallinity of treated MTA sample increased as compared to control. It is presumed that biofield energy may be absorbed by the treated MTA molecules that may lead to formation of more symmetrical crystalline long range pattern that caused increase in intensity of peak. In addition the crystallite size was found to be 104.211 and 59.543 nm in control and treated MTA respectively. The crystallite size was decreased by 42.86 in treated MTA as compared to control Figure 2. The decreased crystallite size may be due to biofield energy that can induce strain in lattice and that possibly resulted in fracturing of grains into sub grains and hence decreased crystallite size 23. MTA is used as intermediate in synthesis of many pharmaceutical compounds hence decrease in crystallite size may lead to fasten the rate kinetics which ultimately enhances the percentage yield of end products 8. Surface area analysis Te surface area of control and treated samples of MTA were investigated using BET method. Te control sample showed a surface area of 0.14 m 2 /g however the treated sample of MTA showed a surface area of 0.29 m 2 /g. Te percentage increase in surface area was 107.14 in the treated MTA sample as compared to control Figure 2. Te XRD results of treated MTA sample revealed that crystallite size decreased afer biofeld treatment. It could be a possible reason for increase in surface area of treated MTA sample 25. Moreover increase in surface area of reactant molecules fastens the rate of reaction 26. Hence it is hypothesized that increase in surface area of treated MTA sample can be used to increase the rate of those reactions where MTA is used as intermediate reagent. Termal studies DSC analysis: DSC was used to determine ΔH and melting temperature in control and treated sample of MTA. Te DSC thermograms of control and treated samples of MTA are shown in Figure 3 and the analysis results are presented in Table 1. In a solid the amount of energy required to change the phase from solid to liquid is known as latent heat of fusion ΔH. Further the energy supplied during phase change i.e. ΔH is stored as potential energy of atoms. Te data showed that ΔH was reduced from 198.78 J/g control to 118.63 J/g in treated MTA. It indicates that ΔH was decreased by 40.32 in treated sample as compared to control Figure 5. Te reduction in Control Treated 2 θ 2 θ Intensity Count Figure 1: XRD diffractogram of control and treated samples of m-toluic acid. -60 -40 -20 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Percent change Crystallite size Surface area Figure 2: Percent change in crystallite size and surface area of treated sample of m-toluic acid.

slide 4:

Citation: Trivedi MK Branton A Trivedi D Nayak G Singh R 2015 Physical Thermal and Spectroscopic Characterization of m-Toluic Acid: an Impact of Biofeld Treatmentr. Biochem Pharmacol Los Angel 4: 178. doi:10.4172/2167-0501.1000178 Page 4 of 8 Volume 4 • Issue 4 • 1000178 Biochem Pharmacol Los Angel ISSN:2167-0501 BCPC an open access journal ΔH revealed that treated MTA probably have extra internal energy in the form of potential energy as compared to control which might be transferred through biofeld treatment. Tis potential energy may be stored in treated MTA molecules that could lead to lowering of ΔH in treated sample as compared to control. However the melting temperature is related to the kinetic energy of the atoms 27. Te melting temperature of treated MTA was increased from 113.51°C control to 116.04°C. Tus data suggest that melting point was increased by 2.23 as compared to control Figure 5. Previously our group reported that biofeld treatment has altered ΔH and melting point in lead and tin powder 28. Besides the increase of melting point in treated MTA suggests that kinetic energy and thermal vibrations of molecules probably altered afer biofeld treatment. In addition the sharpness of the endothermic peaks showed a good degree of crystallinity in control and treated sample of MTA. TGA/DTG analysis: Termogravimetric analysis/derivative thermogravimetry analysis TGA/DTG of control and biofeld treated samples are summarized in Table 1. TGA thermogram Figure 4 showed that control MTA sample started losing weight around 170°C onset and stopped near 212°C end set. However the treated MTA started losing weight near to 164°C onset and terminated near 209°C end set. It indicates that onset temperature of treated MTA decreased by 3.52 as compared to control Figure 5. Furthermore in this process control sample lost 56.25 and treated MTA sample lost 58.60 of its weight which could be due to vaporisation of MTA. Besides DTG thermogram data showed T max at 187.02°C in control whereas it was decreased to 183.32°C in treated MTA Table 1. It indicates that T max was decreased by 1.97 in treated MTA Figure 5. Furthermore the reduction in T max in treated MTA with respect to control sample may be correlated with increase in vaporisation of treated MTA afer biofeld treatment. A possible reason for this reduction in T max is that biofeld energy might cause some alteration in internal energy which results into earlier vaporisation of treated MTA sample as compared to control. Moreover it was previously reported that the state of reactant afect rate of reaction i.e. gases reacts faster than solid and liquids because gases consumed less energy to separate their particles from each other 26. Also decrease in vaporisation temperature indicates that MTA molecules change their phase from liquid to vapour at low temperature which may result in more frequent collision of MTA molecules with other reactants at low temperature hence fasten the reaction rate 26. Apart from that it was previously reported that vapour phase reaction can be more advantageous as compared to liquid phase reaction in terms of reaction time generation of objectionable amounts of odour and undesired by-products 2930. Hence overall observations suggest that biofeld treated MTA can be used to enhance the reaction kinetics and yield of the end product. Spectroscopic studies FT-IR analysis: FT-IR spectra of control T1 and T2 samples of MTA are shown in Figure 6. It showed similar distribution patterns for both control and treated T1 and T2 samples of MTA. Te O-H stretching carboxylic acid peak was appeared at 3061-2576 cm -1 in control MTA. In treated samples O-H stretching carboxylic acid peak appeared in same range i.e. 3061-2576 cm -1 in T1 and 3064-2576 cm -1 in T2 sample. Te peak due to C-H stretching sp 3 was appeared at 2951 2953 and 2951 cm -1 in control T1 and T2 sample respectively. Te CO stretching carboxylic acid peak was appeared at 1689 cm -1 in control and 1685 cm -1 in both T1 and T2 samples. Te peak due to aromatic CC stretching was appeared at 1608 cm -1 in all three samples i.e. control T1 and T2. Similarly C-C stretching peak in ring was found at 1589 cm -1 in all three samples i.e. control T1 and T2. O-H bending peak was found at 1417 1415 and 1417 cm -1 in control T1 and T2 sample respectively. C-O stretching carboxylic acid peak was appeared at 1311 cm -1 in all three samples i.e. control T1 and T2. Similarly C-OH stretching peak appeared at 1217 cm -1 in all three samples i.e. control T1 and T2. C-H bending out of plane peak was found at 931 cm -1 in control and 933 cm -1 in both T1 and T2 sample. Te peak due to meta substituted arene was appeared at 748 cm -1 in control and T1 and at 750 cm -1 in T2. Te FT-IR spectra were well supported by reference data 31. Te FT-IR spectroscopic study showed that no alteration was found in FT-IR spectra of treated samples T1 and T2 as compared to control. It suggests that biofeld treatment did not cause any alteration in structural and bonding properties like bond strength stability rigidity of structure etc. Control Treated Figure 3: DSC thermogram of control and treated samples of m-toluic acid. Parameter Control Treated Latent heat of fusion ΔH J/g 198.78 118.63 Melting point °C 113.51 116.04 T max °C 187.02 183.32 Weight loss 56.25 58.60 T max : temperature at which maximum weight loss occur Table 1: Thermal analysis of control and treated sample of m-Toluic acid.

slide 5:

Citation: Trivedi MK Branton A Trivedi D Nayak G Singh R 2015 Physical Thermal and Spectroscopic Characterization of m-Toluic Acid: an Impact of Biofeld Treatmentr. Biochem Pharmacol Los Angel 4: 178. doi:10.4172/2167-0501.1000178 Page 5 of 8 Volume 4 • Issue 4 • 1000178 Biochem Pharmacol Los Angel ISSN:2167-0501 BCPC an open access journal UV-Vis spectroscopic analysis: Te UV spectra of control and treated samples T1 and T2 of MTA are shown in Figure 7. Te UV spectrum of control sample showed characteristic absorption at 204 nm which was also observed in both treated samples T1 and T2 at 203 nm. Another absorption peak was observed at 230 nm in control sample which was evident in T1 and T2 at 230 nm and 229 nm respectively. Te spectrum of control sample showed weak absorption at 278 nm. Te treated samples i.e. T1 and T2 also showed same kind of peak at 278 nm and 275 nm respectively. Te UV spectrum of control MTA was well supported by literature data 32. It suggests that biofeld treatment could not make any alteration in chemical structure or arrangement of functional groups of treated MTA samples. Conclusion Te overall study showed the infuence of biofeld treatment on physical and thermal properties of MTA. XRD result showed that crystallite size was decreased by 42.86 in treated MTA samples as Control Treated Figure 4: TGA thermogram of control and treated samples of m-toluic acid.

slide 6:

Citation: Trivedi MK Branton A Trivedi D Nayak G Singh R 2015 Physical Thermal and Spectroscopic Characterization of m-Toluic Acid: an Impact of Biofeld Treatmentr. Biochem Pharmacol Los Angel 4: 178. doi:10.4172/2167-0501.1000178 Page 6 of 8 Volume 4 • Issue 4 • 1000178 Biochem Pharmacol Los Angel ISSN:2167-0501 BCPC an open access journal -45 -40 -35 -30 -25 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 Percent change Latent heat of fusion Melting temperature T max Onset temperature Figure 5: Percent change in latent heat of fusion melting point T max and onset temperature in biofeld treated m-toluic acid with respect to control Control T1 T2 Figure 6: FT-IR spectra of control and treated samples of m-toluic acid.

slide 7:

Citation: Trivedi MK Branton A Trivedi D Nayak G Singh R 2015 Physical Thermal and Spectroscopic Characterization of m-Toluic Acid: an Impact of Biofeld Treatmentr. Biochem Pharmacol Los Angel 4: 178. doi:10.4172/2167-0501.1000178 Page 7 of 8 Volume 4 • Issue 4 • 1000178 Biochem Pharmacol Los Angel ISSN:2167-0501 BCPC an open access journal compared to control which might be due to fracturing of grains into sub grains caused by lattice strain produced via biofeld energy. Te surface area analysis showed an increase in surface area of 107.14 in treated MTA sample as compared to control. Te reduced crystallite size and increased surface area may lead to increasing the reaction kinetics of MTA which could make it more useful as an intermediate compound. Termal analysis data revealed that latent heat of fusion was reduced by 40.32 in treated MTA as compared to control. TGA/ DTG studies showed that T max was decreased by 1.97 in treated MTA samples. On the basis of reduction in T max it is hypothesized that MTA molecules turn into vapour phase at low temperature as compared to control. Hence molecules in vapour phase may collide more frequently with other reactants in any reaction that might enhance the rate of reaction. Terefore it is assumed that biofeld treated MTA could be more useful as an intermediate in the production of various pharmaceutical products. Acknowledgement The authors would like to acknowledge the whole team of Sophisticated Analytical Instrument Facility SAIF Nagpur Indian Rubber Manufacturers Research Association IRMRA Thane and MGV Pharmacy College Nashik for providing the instrumental facility. Confict of Interest The authors declare that they have no competing interest. References 1. Wilson CO 2004 Wilson and Gisvolds textbook of organic medicinal and pharmaceutical. 11thedn Lippincott Williams Wilkins Philadelphia U.S. 2. http://www.medipharmalimited.com/whitfeld_ointment.asp 3. Lillard B 1919 Practical druggist and pharmaceutical review of reviews. Lillard Company Michigan U.S. 4. Knoess PH Neeland EG 1998 A modifed synthesis of the insect repellent DEET. J Chem Educ 75: 1267. 5. Bays D Foster R 1974 Benzoylphenylacetic acids and related compounds. U.S. Patent 3828093. 6. Pavia DL Lampman GM Kriz GS Engel RG 2005 Introduction to organic laboratory techniques: A small scale approach. Cengage Learning U.S. 7. Carballo LM Wolf EE 1978 Crystallite size effects during the catalytic oxidation of propylene on Pt/-Al2O3. J Catal 53: 366-373. 8. Chaudhary AL Sheppard DA Paskevicius M Pistidda C Dornheim M et al 2015 Reaction kinetic behaviour with relation to crystallite/grain size dependency in the Mg–Si–H system. Acta Mater 95: 244-253. 9. Movaffaghi Z Farsi M 2009 Biofeld therapies: biophysical basis and biological regulations Complement Ther Clin Pract 15: 35-37. 10. Giasson M Bouchard L 1998 Effect of therapeutic touch on the well-being of persons with terminal cancer. J Holist Nurs 16: 383-398. 11. Peck SD 1998 The effcacy of therapeutic touch for improving functional ability in elders with degenerative arthritis. Nurs Sci Q 11: 123-132. 12. Turner JG Clark AJ Gauthier DK Williams M 1998 The effect of therapeutic touch on pain and anxiety in burn patients. J Adv Nurs 28: 10-20. 13. Mager J Moore D Bendl D Wong B Rachlin K et al. 2007 Evaluating biofeld treatments in a cell culture model of oxidative stress. Explore NY 3: 386-390. 14. Trivedi MK Bhardwaj Y Patil S Shettigar H Bulbule A 2009 Impact of an external energy on Enterococcus faecalis ATCC-51299 in relation to antibiotic susceptibility and biochemical reactions-an experimental study. J Accord Integr Med 5: 119-130. 15. Trivedi MK Patil S 2008 Impact of an external energy on Staphylococcus epidermis ATCC-13518 in relation to antibiotic susceptibility and biochemical reactions-an experimental study. J Accord Integr Med 4: 230-235. 16. Trivedi MK Patil S 2008 Impact of an external energy on Yersinia enterocolitica ATCC-23715 in relation to antibiotic susceptibility and biochemical reactions: An experimental study. Internet J Alternat Med 6: 13. 17. Shinde V Sances F Patil S Spence A 2012 Impact of biofeld treatment on growth and yield of lettuce and tomato. Aust J Basic Appl Sci 6: 100-105. 18. Sances F Flora E Patil S Spence A Shinde V 2013 Impact of biofeld treatment on ginseng and organic blueberry yield. Agrivita J Agric Sci 35: 22- 29. 19. Patil SA Nayak GB Barve SS Tembe RP Khan RR 2012 Impact of biofeld treatment on growth and anatomical characteristics of Pogostemon cablin Benth.. Biotechnology 11: 154-162. 20. Altekar N Nayak G 2015 Effect of biofeld treatment on plant growth and adaptation. J Environ Health Sci 1: 1-9. 21. Dabhade VV Tallapragada RR Trivedi MK 2009 Effect of external energy on atomic crystalline and powder characteristics of antimony and bismuth powders. Bull Mater Sci 32: 471-479. 22. Trivedi MK Nayak G Patil S Tallapragada RM Latiyal O et al. 2015 Studies of the atomic and crystalline characteristics of ceramic oxide nano powders after bio feld treatment. Ind Eng Manage 4: 161. 23. Trivedi MK Tallapragada RR 2008 A transcendental to changing metal powder characteristics. Met Powder Rep 63: 22-28. 24. Pavia DL Lampman GM Kriz GS 2001 Introduction to spectroscopy. 3rdedn Thomson Learning Singapore. 25. Okada K Nagashima T Kameshima Y Yasumori A Tsukada T 2002 Control T1 T2 Figure 7: UV-Vis spectra of control and treated samples of m-toluic acid.

slide 8:

Citation: Trivedi MK Branton A Trivedi D Nayak G Singh R 2015 Physical Thermal and Spectroscopic Characterization of m-Toluic Acid: an Impact of Biofeld Treatmentr. Biochem Pharmacol Los Angel 4: 178. doi:10.4172/2167-0501.1000178 Page 8 of 8 Volume 4 • Issue 4 • 1000178 Biochem Pharmacol Los Angel ISSN:2167-0501 BCPC an open access journal Relationship between formation conditions properties and crystallite size of boehmite. J Colloid Interface Sci 253: 308-314. 26. Espenson JH 1995 Chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms. 2ndedn Mcgraw-Hill U.S. 27. Moore J 2010 Chemistry: The molecular science. 4thedn Brooks Cole Belmont U.S. 28. Trivedi MK Patil S Tallapragada RM 2013 Effect of biofeld treatment on the physical and thermal characteristics of silicon tin and lead powders. J Material Sci Eng 2: 125. 29. Morrell CE Beach LK 1948 Oxidation of aromatic compounds. U.S. Patent 2443832. 30. Hull EH 1979 Production of NN-diethyl-meta-toluamide from meta-toluic acid by liquid phase catalytic reaction with diethylamine. U.S. Patent 4133833. 31. Cutler HG 1999 Biologically active natural products: Agrochemicals. CRC Press U.S. 32. Lang L 1969 Absorption spectra in the ultraviolet and visible region. Akademiai Kiado Publishers Budapest 10: 115-400. Citation: Trivedi MK Branton A Trivedi D Nayak G Singh R 2015 Physical Thermal and Spectroscopic Characterization of m-Toluic Acid: an Impact of Biofeld Treatmentr. Biochem Pharmacol Los Angel 4: 178. doi:10.4172/2167- 0501.1000178 Submit your next manuscript and get advantages of OMICS Group submissions Unique features: • User friendly/feasible website-translation of your paper to 50 world’s leading languages • Audio Version of published paper • Digital articles to share and explore Special features: • 400 Open Access Journals • 30000 editorial team • 21 days rapid review process • Quality and quick editorial review and publication processing • Indexing at PubMed partial Scopus EBSCO Index Copernicus and Google Scholar etc • Sharing Option: Social Networking Enabled • Authors Reviewers and Editors rewarded with online Scientifc Credits • Better discount for your subsequent articles Submit your manuscript at: http://www.omicsonline.org/submission

authorStream Live Help