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Native American Tribes in the Wichita School District:

Native American Tribes in the Wichita School District By Kate Pokorski Cultural Diversity Fall 2011

PowerPoint Presentation:

The Wichita School District has a very diverse student population. Approximately 3% of the student body is Native American. The top five tribes with the largest population represented in the school district are; Sioux, Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, and Potawatomi.

Sioux:

Sioux The Sioux are actually made up of four different groups; the Teton, the Santee, the Yanktonai , and the Yankton, who all speak Siouan dialects. In Canada, the Sioux are known as the Dakota.

Sioux:

Sioux Their ancestral territory was located in the states of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, North Dakota, and South Dakota.

Sioux:

Sioux The Teton branch of the tribe migrated with the buffalo and lived in tipis. The Yankton and Yanktonai also hunted buffalo but lived in permanent villages. These tribes’ way of life was greatly changed after the horse was introduced to North America.

Sioux:

Sioux The Sioux are often the tribe depicted in movies and television shows. They rode horses, lived in tipis, wore feathered head dresses, and in the past they fought the U.S. Calvary. They were involved in the famous battles of Custer’s Last Stand and the Battle at Wounded Knee.

Sioux:

Sioux During the 1900’s the Sioux worked hard to rebuild their lives. Many Native American writers and philosophers are part of the Sioux tribe. They have reservations in North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Montana and Canada. Many tribe members still practice traditional ceremonies and arts and crafts .

Choctaw:

Choctaw The Choctaw were descendents of the mound builders of the Southeast. According to legend they were said to be created from the “Mother Mound” located in Mississippi. The Choctaw name means “flat”. From infancy the foreheads of the male infants were flattened with a board so they kept this trait into adulthood.

Choctaw:

Choctaw The Choctaw’s ancestral land was located in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and Louisiana.

Choctaw:

Choctaw These tribe members were skilled farmers. They grew many different varieties of fruits and vegetables. Farming was their main source of food but they did hunt as well. They were able to carve canoes for hunting and fishing.

Choctaw:

Choctaw The Choctaw tribe played lacrosse, also known as Indian stickball. They took this game very seriously. Villages played neighboring villages, often with pre-games ceremonies and dancing. They held song competitions as well, where they singers could present their own original songs.

Choctaw:

Choctaw Choctaw warriors fought with the Americans during the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. Even so they were the first tribe Andrew Jackson ordered removed to Indian Territory, and so began the Trail of Tears.

Potawatomi:

Potawatomi Potawatomi in Algonquian means “people of the place of fire” so they are also known as the Fire Nation.

Potawatomi:

Potawatomi Their ancestral homeland was in the lower peninsula of Michigan, but after settlers took over their land they moved to Missouri, Iowa, Kansas and Mexico.

Potawatomi:

Potawatomi These tribes were hunters and gatherers. They hunted and fished but also gathered wild rice and grew corn and other crops.

Potawatomi:

Potawatomi Like other Great Lakes tribes they smoked tobacco in sacred pipes. They participated in the Grand Medicine Society. They later helped develop the Big Drum Religion, which is still practiced today. As part of this ritual Indians dance for hours to the beat of a drum.

Potawatomi:

Potawatomi Currently, the different branches of the Potawatomi tribe have reservations in Kansas, Oklahoma, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Ontario. They have raised their standard of living through good business investments, and the selling of traditional crafts.

Cherokee:

Cherokee The Cherokee tribes’ native name is Ani-Yun’wiya , meaning “principal people”.

Cherokee:

Cherokee Their ancestral lands were mainly in the Southeast. They had villages located in North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Tennessee, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Kentucky. At one time, the Cherokee nation had over 60 tribes.

Cherokee:

Cherokee The tribes located their villages close to rivers so they could create large farms where they grew many nuts, fruits, and vegetables. They also fished the rivers, and hunted deer and bear. They created blowguns to hunt smaller game.

Cherokee:

Cherokee There were two chiefs for every village. The White Chief ruled over farming, lawmaking, and settled disputes between individuals. The Red Chief ruled over decisions concerning warfare.

Cherokee:

Cherokee While the Cherokee tribe tried to work with the US government and acclimate themselves to the settlers way of life, they were still forced off their land in the late 1830’s. Their forced removal from Georgia to Indian Territory in the Midwest became known as the Trail of Tears.

Creek:

Creek The Creek received their name from the early traders who found that their villages were built near creeks or rivers.

Creek:

Creek Their ancestral homeland was located in Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Tennessee.

Creek:

Creek This tribe was very skilled at farming. They grew such items as corn, squash, pumpkins, melons, and sweet potatoes. They had both family and communal gardens. They added to their diet by hunting and gathering.

Creek:

Creek The Green Corn Ceremony, a renewal ritual, was the most important of all the Creek ceremonies. At the end of the harvest, hearth fires were extinguished and all cooking utensils were cleaned. The tribe fasted for 4-8 days, then met for a village feast.

Creek:

Creek The Creek villages were divided into “red towns”, where the warriors lived, and “white towns”, where the peacemakers lived. Each village had a town square for ceremonies, and a ceremonial lodge to house the elderly and homeless.

Bibliography:

Bibliography Encyclopedia of Native American Tribes by Carl Waldman, Ill. By Molly Brown, Checkmark Books, New York, Copyright 1999 Native American Indian Chants - Sioux War Dance .mp3 . Web. 2 Dec. 2011. <http://beemp3.com/download.php?file=8421426&song=Sioux+War+Dance>.Sioux War Dance MP3 "Cherokee Traditional Music by Tommy Wildcat." Cherokee Proud . Web. 27 Nov. 2011. <http://www.cherokeeproud.com/tommy.htm>.Cherokee Flute - A Warrior's Spirit MP3 recording "John Two-Hawks - Promo Page - JohnTwoHawks.com." Native American Flute Music of GRAMMY® & Emmy Nominated Platinum Award winning Lakota Indian Flute Player and Musician John Two-Hawks . Web. 02 Dec. 2011. <http://www.johntwohawks.com/theJTHpromopage.html>.Clip from the CD Earth~Fire~Water~Wind , " Peta Wakan - Sacred Fire“ "Creek Stomp Dance." Creek Stomp Dance . Creek Stomp Dance . Web. 27 Nov. 2011. <http://lib.store.yahoo.net/lib/zangomusic/songsofearth-8.mp3>.Creek Stomp Dance MP3 Recording Special thanks to Jeff Watkins, head of the Native American Department for the USD 259 Wichita School District

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