Monarch Butterflies

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By: chuckclark549 (26 month(s) ago)

Probably already sent a message to you, so as you can see I am totally lost. I would like to use your presentation at a program for our Garden Club. Thanks Chuck Clark please email me at brdwtchr at yahoo.com

By: theorchardhouse (33 month(s) ago)

I LOVE this presentation! Very detailed and LOTS of slides!

Presentation Transcript

Monarch Butterflies : 

Monarch Butterflies Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

Slide 2: 

The process from egg to butterfly takes about 1 month. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott Monarch Life Cycle

Slide 4: 

A female monarch lays between 100-300 eggs during her lifetime. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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Monarch eggs are oval in shape. Round eggs are other insects. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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If you look closely, sometimes you can see the black caterpillar head at the top of the egg shell. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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It takes about 4 days for an egg to hatch into a caterpillar. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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The first thing a caterpillar does when it hatches is eat its eggshell. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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When a caterpillar is born, it is about 1 centimeter in length. The caterpillar will grow to about 5 centimeters. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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Caterpillars feed on milkweed. Milkweed is poisonous to other animals, so this protects the caterpillars from predators when they become adults. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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When a caterpillar grows, its skin becomes too tight for its body, so the caterpillar must shed its skin. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

Slide 12: 

A caterpillar squeezes, pushes, and tugs as it wiggles out of its old, tight skin. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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Then it rubs off its face mask. Even the face mask has become too small for its body! Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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After shedding, the caterpillar eats its old skin. The skin is full of vitamins to help it grow. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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The caterpillar continues to grow and shed its skin 5 times. It stays a caterpillar for about 2 weeks. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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When a caterpillar is ready to turn into chrysalis, it will attach itself to the plant stem with silk and form a j. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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The silk button that the caterpillar spins is sticky. It keeps the caterpillar stuck to the stem while it forms its chrysalis. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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The chrysalis is formed from the inside out. The caterpillar’s skin first splits open between the head and back. This process continues until the old skin shrivels away. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

Slide 19: 

The j stage, the transformation stage from caterpillar to chrysalis, lasts about 20 hours. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

Slide 20: 

If you look closely at the chrysalis, you can see the wings outline and belly segments of the butterfly “engraved” on the chrysalis shell. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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You’ll also notice a gold ring near the top. This is how the monarch butterfly gets its name. “Monarch” means king. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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The chrysalis looks green inside and becomes more transparent as the caterpillar transforms into a butterfly. The chrysalis stage lasts about 10 days. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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One day before the butterfly hatches, the chrysalis becomes completely clear. You can see the fully formed butterfly sleeping inside. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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Bright sunlight triggers hatching. Hatching is a quick process. It only takes 10-15 minutes for a butterfly to hatch. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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When its time for hatching, the chrysalis breaks in the middle. The butterfly falls out and grabs the shell with its legs. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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Newborn monarchs have one important thing to do…and that’s stretch its wings! In the chrysalis its wings are packed in tight. When they are born their wings look small and folded. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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The butterfly uses liquid inside its body to unfold its wings. It pumps the liquid through its veins and the wings unfold. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott BEFORE AFTER

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At first, the butterfly’s wings are soft. It has to wait several hours for the wings to dry and harden before it can fly. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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Butterfly wings are made up of thousands of tiny, overlapping scales. These powdery scales gives butterflies their color and pattern. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

Slide 30: 

Monarchs are brightly colored to warn predators that they are poisonous. Monarchs are poisonous because they ate milkweed as caterpillars. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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You can tell if a monarch is a boy or girl by looking at its bottom wings. Boys have a black dot on their lower wings. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott BOY GIRL

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There are 4 generations of monarchs every year. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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First generation monarchs live from March to April. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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Second generation monarchs live from May to June. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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Third generation monarchs live from July to August. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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The first, second, and third generation monarchs only live 2-6 weeks after they hatch from the chrysalis. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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The fourth generation of monarchs are born in September and October. They live the longest. They can live 6-8 months! Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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These are the monarchs that travel south for the winter. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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The fourth generation monarchs travel between 50-100 miles a day. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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They fly during the day, and roost at night. Monarchs huddle together to keep warm. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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It can take the monarchs up to two months or 3,000 miles to reach their destination. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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Monarchs settle in Mexico and California to live during for the winter. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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In February and March, the fourth generation lays its eggs and die. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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A new generation is born and begins to fly north. It takes 3-4 generations of monarchs to make the flight back to the United States in the Spring. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

Slide 45: 

The monarchs migration is truly a miracle. They are the only butterflies known to make a two way migration like birds do. Copyright © 2009 Kelly Mott

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