Symmetry (Culture and Aesthetics)

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How we see symmetry in nature, Hawaiian culture, graphic designs, and South Korean culture.

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Symmetryin Nature ,Culture, Media, and Aesthetics : 

Symmetryin Nature ,Culture, Media, and Aesthetics Kayla Webb

First Glance : 

First Glance Symmetry is, at its base, is mathematics An object or design would be considered symmetrical if it looked the same after a specific change was made to it Some mathematical changes that would be applied include translation, rotation, reflection, and any combination of the three.

Translations : 

Translations A translation in math is sliding an object or design across a plane; in symmetry, the design is repeated in one or more directions “Translation” (or Repetition) symmetry is often seen in cultural patterns, and also in fabrics and art This pattern uses repetition in black and white. SOURCE http://photoclub.canadiangeographic.ca/photos/patterns/images/107067/304x375.aspx

Rotations : 

Rotations Rotation in math is the movement of a design around one point; in symmetry, you see the object or design repeated around that point “Rotational” symmetry can often be seen in nature (flowers, starfish) and art All five petals of this native Hawaiian flower are symmetrical, all stemming from the center point. SOURCE http://www.globusjourneys.com/Common/Images/Destinations/hawaiian-flower.jpg

Reflections : 

Reflections Reflections in math require an object to be flipped vertically or horizontally across a line; in symmetry, we see both sides These are perhaps the most commonly seen forms of symmetry; seen in faces, bodies, animals, and many everyday household items In aesthetics, attractiveness is often times based on the level of symmetry between each half of the human face. SOURCE http://www.brandonsd.mb.ca/neelin/art/Additions%20(July%202003)/S2%20Symmetrical%20Face.jpg

Symmetry in Hawaii : 

Symmetry in Hawaii We see so much symmetry every day here in Hawaii without realizing it. Architecture, plants, sea life, cultural art – all can be symmetrical. If we are to look deeply into the design of the lei, we’ll see all three types of symmetry: the flower pedals show radial symmetry, there’s repetition of the flowers, and if we are to look at both halves of the flowers, they show reflection as well. SOURCE http://www.hawaiiflowerlei.com/storeimages/F61894809FA8EF8E2C0752868632332D.jpg The state fish, the Humuhumunukunukuapua’a, is symmetrical on both sides. SOURCE http://discovergarden.com.s59851.gridserver.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/humuhumu.jpg

Symmetry in Graphic Design : 

Symmetry in Graphic Design Company logos usually incorporate interesting symmetrical designs to catch the eyes of the consumers. These logos (from top to bottom, Toyota, Beijing Olympics, and Gucci) each have one or more symmetrical attributes. SOURCES (in order) http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/eng/eed/research/peater/links/toyota.jpg http://bromattsblog.files.wordpress.com/2008/08/2008-olympics.jpg http://www.lifeinitaly.com/files/Gucci_Logo.gif Even the very basic design – the star – that is in the logo of Converse All Star shoes incorporates both rotational and reflection symmetry. SOURCE http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_zmoEeqomXD4/SiwEj_cP9KI/AAAAAAAACVY/-XD1YzRc4mI/s400/converse-all-star-logo.jpg

Symmetry in Nature : 

Symmetry in Nature Symmetry occurs naturally in most forms of life. Over hundreds of thousands of years, we have developed an instinctual fondness of symmetrical things. Several species of birds are thought to be most attracted to a symmetrical partner. This shows how symmetry is not only something that humans find aesthetically pleasing, but also what continues the line of several species. SOURCE http://iberianature.com/lucyblog/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/robin-in-bush2.jpg Several types of plants, including this ivy leaf shown above, show reflection symmetry. SOURCE http://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~alphaphi/public_html/Pictures/Ivy_leaf.jpg

Symmetry in South Korea : 

Symmetry in South Korea The South Korean flag is a great example of symmetry in culture. In the center is a design similar to that of yin-yang. Both sides are the same size and shape. On all four corners of the flag are three rows of lines, each slightly different from the rest. SOURCE http://gregorybrundage.tripod.com/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/korean_flag.gif SOURCE http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/img/art/070501_p18_knot3.jpg Another example of symmetry can be found in traditional Korean knots. They show repetition as well as reflection symmetry.

My Design : 

My Design Based off of the traditional Korean knot 1. Create two similar circles, and place the smaller in the center of the other; group together 2. Resize, then copy and paste to make 9, aligning circles properly into a diamond; group together 3. Around the diamond, connect 8 more circles, black on top and bottom, red on left and right, and blue in between; arrange colored circles as “Send to back”; group 4. Resize design, copy and paste, aligning in a row. Design is complete!

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