LarPCalcLim2_01_01

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

No description available.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Slide 1:

Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. 1 Functions and Their Graphs

Slide 2:

1.1 RECTANGULAR COORDINATES Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

What You Should Learn:

Plot points in the Cartesian plane. Use the Distance Formula to find the distance between two points. Use the Midpoint Formula to find the midpoint of a line segment. Use a coordinate plane to model and solve real-life problems. What You Should Learn

Slide 4:

The Cartesian Plane

The Cartesian Plane:

The Cartesian Plane Just as you can represent real numbers by points on a real number line, you can represent ordered pairs of real numbers by points in a plane called the rectangular coordinate system, or the Cartesian plane, named after the French mathematician René Descartes. The Cartesian plane is formed by using two real number lines intersecting at right angles, as shown in Figure 1.1. Figure 1.1

The Cartesian Plane:

The Cartesian Plane The horizontal real number line is usually called the x -axis, and the vertical real number line is usually called the y -axis. The point of intersection of these two axes is the origin, and the two axes divide the plane into four parts called quadrants. Each point in the plane corresponds to an ordered pair ( x , y ) of real numbers x and y , called coordinates of the point.

The Cartesian Plane:

The Cartesian Plane The x -coordinate represents the directed distance from the y -axis to the point, and the y -coordinate represents the directed distance from the x -axis to the point, as shown in Figure 1.2. ( x , y ) The notation ( x , y ) denotes both a point in the plane and an open interval on the real number line. The context will tell you which meaning is intended. Figure 1.2 Directed distance from y -axis Directed distance from x -axis

Example 1 – Plotting Points in the Cartesian Plane:

Example 1 – Plotting Points in the Cartesian Plane Plot the points (–1, 2), (3, 4), (0, 0), (3, 0), and (–2, –3). Solution: To plot the point (–1, 2), imagine a vertical line through –1 on the x -axis and a horizontal line through 2 on the y -axis. The intersection of these two lines is the point (–1, 2). The other four points can be plotted in a similar way, as shown in Figure 1.3. Figure 1.3

The Cartesian Plane:

The Cartesian Plane The beauty of a rectangular coordinate system is that it allows you to see relationships between two variables. It would be difficult to overestimate the importance of Descartes’s introduction of coordinates in the plane.

Slide 10:

The Pythagorean Theorem and the Distance Formula

The Pythagorean Theorem and the Distance Formula:

The Pythagorean Theorem and the Distance Formula The following famous theorem is used extensively throughout this course. Figure 1.5

The Pythagorean Theorem and the Distance Formula:

The Pythagorean Theorem and the Distance Formula Suppose you want to determine the distance d between two points ( x 1 , y 1 ) and ( x 2 , y 2 ) in the plane. With these two points, a right triangle can be formed, as shown in Figure 1.6. Figure 1.6

The Pythagorean Theorem and the Distance Formula:

The Pythagorean Theorem and the Distance Formula The length of the vertical side of the triangle is | y 2 – y 1 |, and the length of the horizontal side is | x 2 – x 1 |. By the Pythagorean Theorem, you can write d 2 = | x 2 – x 1 | 2 + | y 2 – y 1 | 2 d = This result is the Distance Formula.

Example 3 – Finding a Distance:

Example 3 – Finding a Distance Find the distance between the points (–2, 1) and (3, 4). Solution: Let ( x 1 , y 1 ) = (–2, 1) and ( x 2 , y 2 ) = (3, 4). Then apply the Distance Formula. Distance Formula Substitute for x 1 , y 1 , x 2 , and y 2 . Simplify.

Example 3 – Solution:

Example 3 – Solution So, the distance between the points is about 5.83 units. You can use the Pythagorean Theorem to check that the distance is correct. d 2 ≟ 3 2 + 5 2 ≟ 3 2 + 5 2 34 = 34 cont’d Pythagorean Theorem Substitute for d . Distance checks. Simplify. Use a calculator.

Slide 16:

The Midpoint Formula

The Midpoint Formula:

The Midpoint Formula To find the midpoint of the line segment that joins two points in a coordinate plane, you can simply find the average values of the respective coordinates of the two endpoints using the Midpoint Formula.

Example 5 – Finding a Line Segment’s Midpoint:

Example 5 – Finding a Line Segment’s Midpoint Find the midpoint of the line segment joining the points (–5, –3) and (9, 3). Solution: Let ( x 1 , y 1 ) = (–5, –3) and ( x 2 , y 2 ) = (9, 3). Midpoint Formula Substitute for x 1 , y 1 , x 2 , and y 2 .

Example 5 – Solution :

Example 5 – Solution The midpoint of the line segment is (2, 0), as shown in Figure 1.9. Simplify. Figure 1.9 cont’d

Slide 20:

Applications

Example 6 – Finding the Length of a Pass:

Example 6 – Finding the Length of a Pass A football quarterback throws a pass from the 28-yard line, 40 yards from the sideline. The pass is caught by a wide receiver on the 5-yard line, 20 yards from the same sideline, as shown in Figure 1.10. How long is the pass? Figure 1.10

Example 6 – Solution :

Example 6 – Solution You can find the length of the pass by finding the distance between the points (40, 28) and (20, 5). So, the pass is about 30 yards long. Distance Formula Substitute for x 1 , y 1 , x 2 , and y 2 . Simplify. Simplify. Use a calculator.

Applications:

Applications In Example 6, the scale along the goal line does not normally appear on a football field. However, when you use coordinate geometry to solve real-life problems, you are free to place the coordinate system in any way that is convenient for the solution of the problem.

authorStream Live Help