Librarians and Social Capital

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A crowd-sourced talk built on social capital.

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http://www.writerscast.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Daniel-Pink-Sketchnote- web.jpg

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we need social capital to build our knowledge and our communities

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l ibrary community pln

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b uild community

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http://www.slate.com/articles/life/design/2014/04/ the_future_of_the_library_how_they_ll_evolve_for_the_digital_age.html

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Librarians build tools to enhance their true collection – the communities they serve . The community is y our collection. Closing Keynote for ILEADU March Session. Springfield, IL https ://vimeo.com/ 90151815

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The community is the collection. If you want to be a brilliant librarian. If you want to make a difference in people’s lives . . . You must be active. You must see your community as your collection and you must be into collection development every day. Not sitting behind a desk . . .not waiting for someone to come to you and ask for help, but being out there and saying, “I’m here. You’re important. . . You are not in the library business. You are not in the book business. You are not in the building business. You are not in the website business. You are in the community business. Dave Lankes , Closing Keynote for ILEADU March Session. Springfield, IL https://vimeo.com/90151815

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We’re all in sales. Selling isn’t just selling . U pserving means doing more for the other person than he expects or you initially intended, taking the extra steps that transform a mundane interaction into a memorable experience .

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Sipyeykina, Dar'ya “Speechless.” 25 Jan. 2009. Flickr . http :// www.flickr.com /photos/10522622@N00/3228273137 It won’t help to be a social media introvert.

What is social capital? :

What is social capital? Resources and support accumulated by an individual, institution or group through relationships and the possession of a durable network. Tappable goodwill available

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Social capital is what allows any organization or individual to make requests of its followers successfully. Think of social capital as funds in a sort of intangible bank account that you add to by listening to, engaging with, and doing favors for others. Each time you make a request, you are drawing on that account. If no social capital has been established from which to draw, actions requested of others are likely to be ignored. Having social capital is, in many ways, equivalent to having credibility in a selected online community. Social capital can be earned only over time, by participating appropriately in the community. Laura Solomon, on Save Ohio Libraries 2009, missing lack of followers & lack of social capital http://www.americanlibrariesmagazine.org/article/understanding-social-capital

It’s not just who you know, but . . .:

It’s not just who you know, but . . . who/what you have access to because of/via who you know s ocial capital increases when you use it .

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personal / Professional e go-centric l ibrary/ instutional Community-centric

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Howard Rheingold NetSmart What does Howard say About social capital?

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New knowledge about the nature of networks is essential for getting around in this century because digital data and human communication networks erase barriers and multiply possibilities for one of our most powerful capabilities: our sociality . Howard Rheingold, Net Smart , p. 23

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Milgram : “Six Degrees of Separation” ( Psychology Today , 1967) The small world problem Milgram, S. (1967). The small world problem. Psychology today , 2 (1), 60-67 . Randomly selected people in mid-West to send packages to stranger in Massachusetts. Senders knew the recipient's name, occupation, general location. Instructed to send package to person they knew on a first-name basis who they thought was most likely, out of all their friends, to know the target personally . That person would do the same, and so on, until the package was personally delivered to its target recipient. Participants expected the chain to include more than a hundred intermediaries Took (on average) between five and seven intermediaries to get each package delivered.

Anyone can be connected to any other person through a chain of acquaintances with no more than five intermediaries. :

Anyone can be connected to any other person through a chain of acquaintances with no more than five intermediaries.

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Which are the most important nodes in this network?

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Granovetter , M. S. (1973). The strength of weak ties: A network theory revisited American journal of sociology , 1360-1380.

Mark Granovetter 1973 study “The Strength of Weak Ties”:

Mark Granovetter 1973 study “ The Strength of Weak Ties” Before the study, strong ties considered most important W eak ties matter, a lot! Jobs come from weak network ties, more often than strong Diversity is important— people who are nothing like you

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strength of weak ties (sociological concept connected to network analysis) Strong vs. weak (really a continuum) Strong=trusted friends & family, not many (10ish?) Weak=co-workers, classmates, acquaintances People you don’t spend lots of time with (many of them )

Bridges:

Bridges Tie strength is related to how information spreads through networks Strong ties more trusted Strong ties overlap Strong ties are rarely bridges Weak ties lead to ideas beyond and help us make discoveries Weak ties most important in social networks Information reaches larger number of people diffused through weak ties Most times weak ties form bridges in networks, connecting groups

Think about jokes and ties:

Think about jokes and ties

Two types of social capital (Robert Putnam):

Two types of social capital (Robert Putnam) Bonding: emotional & substantive support, usually through strong ties Bridging: new information possible, often through weak ties to diverse groups

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Noordegraaf , Marina. Generatiekloof . 18 Sep. 2012. Flickr . https ://www.flickr.com/photos/verbeeldingskr8/8002418180 /

Implications:

Implications When you create and share content across weak ties, you reach new people, attract opportunities, access new content. Blair, Ann. Two Hands Reach Out. 5 June 2006 Flickr . https:// www.flickr.com /photos/ frances __ ann __ blair /161423548/

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authors experts community parents scholars journalists + o ther librarians

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(some) Old rules are effective

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+ Fundamentals: Don't criticize, condemn or complain. Give honest and sincere appreciation. Arouse in the other person an eager want . Six ways to make people like you 1. Become genuinely interested in other people. 2. Smile . 3. Remember that a person's name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in any language. 4. Be a good listener. Encourage others to talk about themselves. 5. Talk in terms of the other person's interests. 6. Make the other person feel important - and do it sincerely .

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(some) Old rules are not effective

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What would Don Draper do today?

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Whoever you are, I’ve always depended on the kindness of strangers . A Streetcar Named Desire. Dir. Elia Kazan. Perf . Vivien Leigh. Warner Bros., 1951. Film .

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I am your community. I can talk. I can help readers talk to each other. I can help readers learn what they like. I can help readers find more of what they like. I can be wherever the reader needs me.

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INADEQUATE

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new rules

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In a networked world You are your content & connections You are somebody’s critical weak tie Someone else is your critical weak tie You can scan, curate, interpret, create meaningful content for others You can bridge connections for others You can find/get what you need if you plan for it

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Create/contribute/share

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http://flipgrid.com/# 35423ff0

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Success is increasingly dependent on how we interact with others . M ost people operate as either takers, matchers, or givers. Whereas takers strive to get as much as possible from others and matchers aim to trade evenly, givers are the rare breed of people who contribute to others without expecting anything in return. Although some givers get exploited and burn out, the rest achieve extraordinary results across a wide range of industries. ‹

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Jono Hey, Sketchplanations http ://www.sketchplanations.com/post/83450471103/sharing-is-taking-a-risk-increases- quality

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http://flipgrid.com/# 4f31d787

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https://www.flickr.com/photos/info_grrl/sets/72157625298744518 /

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http://www.slideshare.net / http:// www.authorstream.com

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http://www.slideshare.net/LouiseSpiteri/social-medias-role-in-tenure-and-promotion-2014- 0317

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r eciprocate

Social Capital is reciprocal :

Social Capital is reciprocal The more you give . . . the more you get

reciprocity:

reciprocity social norm of in-kind responses to the behavior of others; in cultural anthropology , defined as people's informal exchange of goods and labour . Social Media Issues Lexicon

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Gaining social capital really means becoming a strong, consistent member of the online community. People expect reciprocity. Building a social media reputation means giving back.

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http://homes.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman/publications/reciprocity05/reciprocity3-5.pdf Plickert , G., Côté , R. R., & Wellman, B. (2007). It's not who you know, it's how you know them: Who exchanges what with whom?. Social Networks , 29 (3), 405-429.

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http://flipgrid.com/# 25e6b94e

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http://flipgrid.com/# b3d25097

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ask

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Ask for readers’ favorite Oprah Book Club pick or their favorite program at the library. Try asking for opinions on the worst book ever written. The more controversial the question, the more feedback it will likely get. Although generating controversy for its own sake may not be your library’s goal, facilitating conversation between the library and others is something you want.

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http://flipgrid.com/# db4d46c9

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http://vanmeterlibraryvoice.blogspot.com/2013/07/i-would-love-to-hearwhat-changes-do- you.html http://padlet.com/wall/ a6ep53laoi

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u nderstand/empathize/respond

We are not in the book business, we are in the St. Paul business.:

We are not in the book business, we are in the St. Paul business. http://youtu.be/tWbgQLjXPIk?t=45s

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http://www.startribune.com/opinion/commentaries/244422731. html

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p raise/credit/thank

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http://vanmeterlibraryvoice.blogspot.com /

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  

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http://www.curatorscode.org /

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r each out to strong, and Weak ties!

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You’re not just hiring me; you’re hiring all the smart people I know.

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http://flipgrid.com/# d89375c1

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http://flipgrid.com/# 6ecc06c0

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http://flipgrid.com/# 8f979752

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http:// flipgrid.com /#ebe8aeab

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http://www.slideshare.net/ JustinTheLibrarian

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m entor/support/learn

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http:// flipgrid.com /#a9cee7e6

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http://flipgrid.com/# 60ba2ff7

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nominate

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http://emilyvalenza.tumblr.com /

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a mplify signal (conference share)

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http://flipgrid.com/# c3434348

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add value/interpret

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https://www.smore.com/f677-a-copyright-friendly- toolkit

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curate

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blogs # books videos wikis journal articles tweets podcasts mobile apps aggregated content infographics google docs ebooks presentations s tudent work digital storytelling publishing tools museum collections So much stuff! !

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http://pinterest.com/westonhslibrary/boards / Alida Hanson

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http://www.pinterest.com/oplteenzone /

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http://www.pinterest.com/ArtPictureNYPL /

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http://storify.com

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Curation is the new search!

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http://libguides.com /

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How will you use the Seek-Sense-Share model to support your personal learning agenda? The Seek/Sense/Share Framework 10 Feb. 2014 Seeking is finding things out and keeping up to date. Building a network of colleagues is helpful in this regard. It not only allows us to “pull” information, but also have it “pushed” to us by trusted sources. Good curators are valued members of knowledge networks. Sensing is how we personalize information and use it. Sensing includes reflection and putting into practice what we have learned. Often it requires experimentation, as we learn best by doing. Sharing includes exchanging resources, ideas, and experiences with our networks as well as collaborating with our colleagues. The multiple pieces of information that we capture and share can increase the frequency of serendipitous connections, especially across organizations and disciplines where real innovation happens. As Steven Johnson, author of Where Good Ideas Come From says; “chance favors the connected mind”. Harold Jarche

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http://curation.masternewmedia.org /

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Connect/engage/participate

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Fisch , Martin. „ eMOTION .” 24 Aug . 2012 Flickr . http :// www.flickr.com / photos /45409431@N00/8150285487 PARTICIPATORY CULTURE (Jenkins 2006) We have new opportunities to: work collaboratively e ngage in informal mentorships disseminate news and ideas connect engage civically c reate contribute (your contributions matter!)

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Participation mean listening To each other To the community Behind our silos

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I learned from my PLN that a PLN is at the same time my personally curated network of people I want to learn from and a network that learns together. Net Smart , 228

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http://flipgrid.com/# 937ba8de

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“A tribe is a group of people connected to one another, connected to a leader, and connected to an idea. For millions of years, human beings have been part of one tribe or another. A group needs only two things to be a tribe: a shared interest and a way to communicate.” “Leaders lead when they take positions, when they connect with their tribes, and when they help the tribe connect to itself.”

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http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/06/20/on-iste-and-ala-and-our-tribe /

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http://www.onlinecollegecourses.com/2012/10/17/popular-educational-twitter-hashtags /

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http://www.teachthought.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/twitter-abbreviation-guide- education.jpg

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http://www.americanlibrariesmagazine.org/article/understanding-social- capital

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Hit the start button

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Noordegraaf , Marina. “The Tipping Point.”26 Apr. 2009 . Flickr. https ://www.flickr.com/photos/35429044@N04/3479451264/ lightbox /

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http://flipgrid.com/# 3f6fc041

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http://flipgrid.com/# 7702b3ef

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learn from new “experts” y ou can be a gladiator too!

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m onitor your “brand”/reputation

What does the conversation about you, your library, look like?:

What does the conversation about you, your library, look like?

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Everything you do now ends up in your permanent record. The best plan is to overload Google with a long tail of good stuff and to always act as if you're on Candid Camera, because you are. Seth Godin, Permanent Branding in the Age of Google http:// sethgodin.typepad.com / seths_blog /2009/02/personal-branding-in-the-age-of- google.html

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Your email SIG

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Matthew’s advice: Use your Pulse Comment, share, write Write thoughtful endorsements (not Facebook likes) If you write thoughtful endorsements for others, they are more likely to write them for you Share articles, slideshows, videos that represent you and your persona well Study who is viewing you Check out how many are viewing what you share and when Profile views are less important than content views Determine what people are interested in that you are sharing Everything you share goes on your permanent record Don’t overshare ! You can make the first step! LinkedIn Premium allows you to inmail .

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http://inmaps.linkedinlabs.com /

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http://about.me/search/ keyword:librarian

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http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2012/12/09/web-cred/

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https://hootsuite.com/dashboard

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n otice me list? What do I want to learn about? Who are the experts? Who are the thought leaders? Is my network diverse enough ? Who are the bridges? What are the important hashtags ? Who are the leaders following? Have they created lists? Build a list Follow people you admire & people they follow Retweet with thoughtful comments MT tweets for different audiences Leverage and mash-up established hashtags for groups, conferences, associations Appropriately amplify with @ signs Tweet & reply with useful content: posts, news, video, slides Share your original work When your experts follow you, DM carefully. Introduce yourself and cultivate your relationship. D o NOT immediately ask for favors!

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http://alexisgrant.com/2012/09/19/use-this-twitter-technique-to-make-big-things-happen /

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https://www.vizify.com/joyce-valenza/twitter- video

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New measures of academic impact ? A new social “media” contract for scholars ? Article downloads from ResearchGate or Academia.edu ? Tweets about research / presentations? Blog post views? Comments? Slides viewed / slides downloaded SlideShare / AuthorStream ? Collaborations on Mendeley ? Sharing on Bibsonomy ?

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http://altmetrics.org/about /

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New playgrounds for scholars

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http:// www.flickr.com / photos /45409431@N00/8150285487 http:// www.flickr.com / photos /45409431@N00/8150285487

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1369118X. 2014.884612

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benefits risks

Identity is brand What is your personal brand? How can you manage it? Improve it?:

Identity is brand What is your personal brand? How can you manage it? Improve it?

What is the perception others have of you based on what is discoverable? Who is talking about you and what are they saying? How are we/they influencing the conversation? Are you publishing? How do you keep up? Are you listening? Can people find the stuff you want them to find?:

What is the perception others have of you based on what is discoverable? Who is talking about you and what are they saying? How are we/they influencing the conversation? Are you publishing? How do you keep up? Are you listening? Can people find the stuff you want them to find?

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crowdsource

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https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/ 96705

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http://flipgrid.com/# 74fcdef5

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I built this talk on Social capital

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http://flipgrid.com/# 5028ddeb

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this presentation is about social capital in more htan one way

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social capital Is earned

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http://youtu.be/0k_Vsmqf6X8?t= 4m30s George Bailey is an iconic example It's a Wonderful Life . Dir. Frank Capra. Perf . James Stewart, Donna Reed, Lionel Barrymore, and Thomas Mitchell. RKO, 1946 . Film .

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Robert Krulwich , science writer, co-producer of WNYC’s Radiolab , Peabody Award winner for broadcast excellence. http://youtu.be/MeW4XyJBevA?t=26m19s

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new rules t hank/credit/praise curate mentor reciprocate contribute /share add value

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new questions: How can I use the tools at hand to: Build community? Contribute/make a difference? Continue to learn and grow?

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hit “go”

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You can use your investment to engage, improve, do good, make your community / the world a better place.

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My site: http://about.me/jvalenza My blog: http://blog.schoollibraryjournal.com /Neverendingsearch/ My tweets: @ joycevalenza

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How will you leverage your connections tonight To build social capital?

References :

References Appel , L., Dadlani , P., Dwyer, M., Hampton, K., Kitzie , V., Matni , Z. A., ... & Teodoro , R. (2014). Testing the validity of social capital measures in the study of information and communication technologies. Information, Communication & Society , (ahead-of-print), 1-19 . Coleman , J. S. (1988). Social capital in the creation of human capital. American Journal of Sociology, 94(Supplement), S95–S120. Ferguson , S. (2012). Are Public Libraries Developers of Social Capital? A Review of Their Contribution and Attempts to Demonstrate It. Australian Library Journal , 61 (1), 22-33. Granovetter , M. S. (1973). The strength of weak ties. American Journal of Sociology, 78(6), 1360–1380. Granovetter , M. S. (1982). The strength of weak ties: A network theory revisited. In P. V.Mardsen & N.Lin (Eds.), Social Structure and Network Analysis (pp. 105–130). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Johnson , C. (2012). How do public libraries create social capital? An analysis of interactions between library staff and patrons. Library & Information Science Research (07408188) , 34 (1), 52-62. Putnam, R. D.(1995). Bowling Alone: America's Declining Social Capital. Journal of Democracy 6(1), 65-78. The Johns Hopkins University Press. Retrieved April 15, 2014, from Project MUSE database . Putnam, R. (2000). Bowling Alone . New York, NY: Simon & Schuster .

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