Digital Lives and Virtual Spaces: Exploiting Sweet Spots for Learning

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

Visit to UMD

Comments

Presentation Transcript

PowerPoint Presentation:

Jaci XIII. “The Light and the Knowledge.” 1 Jul. 2011. Flickr . 22 Oct. 2011. <http://www.flickr.com/photos/turatti/5890985691/in/photostream/> . Digital Lives and Virtual Spaces: Exploiting the Sweet Spot to Enhance Adolescent Learning Joyce Kasman Valenza joycevalenza@gmail.com @ joycevalenza http:// joyceumdvisit.wikispaces.com / /

PowerPoint Presentation:

SWEET SPOT: a place where a combination of factors results in a maximum response for a given amount of effort. In tennis, baseball, or cricket, a given swing will result in a more powerful hit if the ball strikes the racquet or bat on the latter's sweet spot. Wikipedia Myles. “Great Picture.” 5 May 2008 . Flickr . 21 Jan. 2012. < http :// www.flickr.com / photos /35034347347@N01/ 2472243225> .

PowerPoint Presentation:

Crrion , Fran Parra. “ Pseudoviaje .” 18 Oct. 2011. Flick r . 6 Feb. 2012. http://www.flickr.com/photos/45392841@N08/6314568693 my research journey

PowerPoint Presentation:

a few sweet spots

PowerPoint Presentation:

Malias . “Suitcases.” 4 Jun. 2006. Flickr . 6 Feb. 2012. <http://www.flickr.com/photos/62752875@N00/160044163>. Informal exit interviews (10 years ) ) Focus groups—high school seniors, 2005 Web-based survey of seniors (14 high school sites) 2005 Delphi panel selected sample, identified features/characteristics, built taxonomies, 2006 Content analysis of effective practice, 2007 Statewide curation program LSTA/PDE Grant, 2011/2012

PowerPoint Presentation:

Traditional Front Door

PowerPoint Presentation:

Nunley, Donnie. “Luminous.” 13 Aug. 2011. Flickr . Web. 18 Oct. 2011. < http://www.flickr.com/photos/42986213@N02/6083823817>. entry points

PowerPoint Presentation:

c 1996

PowerPoint Presentation:

10

Significance of problem (2007 and now) :

Significance of problem (2007 and now ) Learners largely online School library sites still an emerging practice Little research No attempt to identify/classify content or characteristics No generally accepted criteria for effective practice Despite potential, no formal models of effective practice Proimos , Alex E. “Head in Hands.” 14 Dec. 2009. Flickr. 8 Feb. 2012. < http :// www.flickr.com / photos /34120957@N04/ 4199675334> .

PowerPoint Presentation:

The website contributed to my understanding of: Frequency n=1257 student responses

PowerPoint Presentation:

Which pages on the site do you find most valuable? n=1257 student responses

PowerPoint Presentation:

Organization/ Navigation : Links don ’ t make sense Accessibility: Website address should be shorter. Descriptions/Annotations: Clearer labeling. Describe it! Images/Aesthetics: Boring! Make it cooler looking. It ’ s boring. More graphics, more color.. Teacher/Project Links: More of what the teachers go over in class Passwords: E asier way to find the passwords. Databases: Greater variety of databases. More like Gale. Book stuff: Include reading suggestion lists. Filters and Blocking : Stop blocking all the sites! Needed improvements--open-ended questions)

Web-based Survey Observations:

Web -based Survey Observations Significant difference in data and acceptance across schools. Website part of the larger school story. Students in some schools clearly value the websites, in others, the level of acceptance generally positive but moderate Students will use these resources when we are not looking Students view sites as learning landscapes (resonance with Todd, Kuhlthau , & OELMA, 2004) Overall positive responses in access to the documentation help, the OPAC, catalog, search tools, databases and college search links Effective virtual libraries hybrid/blended experiences, best when combined with face-to-face instruction, supported by whole-school programs

PowerPoint Presentation:

Valenza, J. K. ( 2007) . “It’d be really dumb not to use it”: Virtual libraries and high school students’ information seeking and use – a focus group investigation. In M. K. Chelton and C. Cool (Eds.), Youth information-seeking behavior II (pp. 207-255). Toronto: Scarecrow Press . Focus groups of non-novice users

PowerPoint Presentation:

(43)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Study shift: How are kids connecting? What does it mean for us?

PowerPoint Presentation:

High school seniors and social networking Denise E. Agosto , Joyce Kasman Valenza June Abbas

PowerPoint Presentation:

Six focus groups Group 1: ( 10 teens – 3 boys, 7 girls ) Group 2 (7 teens – 6 boys, 1 girl ) Group 2 (11 teens – 10 boys, 1 girl) Group 4 (5 teens – 4 boys, 1 girl) Group 5 (6 teens – 5 boys, 1 girl) Group 6 (6 teens – 6 boys ) Total: 45 teens 34 boys, 11 girls 18 years-old

PowerPoint Presentation:

On frequency You’re always connected to everyone. Everyone always has their phones on. We send about 30 text messages a day –mostly with the same three or four close friends. I spend about an hour a day on Facebook actively, but leave it on in the background for three to three and a half hours a day while doing other things . According to phone bills, I send and receive more than 1000 text messages each month.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Text conversations can go on “anywhere, at any time.” Text conversations go on for days, beyond when one person hangs up . Texting is more fun than a phone call – because there cannot be long pauses in a spoken conversation, which means that “a phone call is a lot of pressure.” We’re not offended if people text while talking to them face-to-face, as long as the verbal conversation is kept “fluid. The art of texting

PowerPoint Presentation:

Don’t copy my prom dress!

PowerPoint Presentation:

Getting ready for college

PowerPoint Presentation:

“When I find out who my roommate is, the first thing I’m going to do is look him up on Facebook .” In each group, students reported finding their college roommates through Facebook . Used after the decision was made to connect to other in-coming students: “It made me more excited about going there. ” It “breaks that barrier of awkwardness” to have met online first before arriving at college. Joined Facebook groups for students with same majors Arranged mall meet-ups before school started Plan to use it to find friends while at college and to stay in touch with high school friends, Will friend people they don’t know who are going to go the same colleges next year I want to have friends already in place when they arrive at college

PowerPoint Presentation:

Groups generally agreed that the girls text more, take more pictures (mostly of themselves & friends), hold longer conversations Female: We have so many more questions! On Gender

PowerPoint Presentation:

Concerns Groups agreed that the quality of their work (especially homework) would be improved if they stopped multitasking, but then they would probably be bored.

PowerPoint Presentation:

What does it mean for us?

PowerPoint Presentation:

At least four rules to guide the design of online library services for teens: 1 . Use multiple contact methods; 2. Employ frequent updating and maintenance; 3. Help teens stay connected by providing access; and 4. Talk to teens to understand their changing communication and information needs. (13)

PowerPoint Presentation:

What does effective hybrid practice look like? Influence of School Library Websites on Youth Information-Seeking Behavior Discovering a Descriptive Taxonomy of Attributes of Exemplary School Library Websites

PowerPoint Presentation:

Jhoweaa . “Ann Arbor Library.” 19 Dec. 2006. Flickr .<http://www.flickr.com/photos/85853849@N00/327651705/>. Discovering a Descriptive Taxonomy of Attributes of Exemplary School Library Websites Purpose: To operationalize concept of “ exemplary practice ”

Website as instructional tool:

Website as instructional tool Kuhlthau (1997, 1999) websites as constructivist environments new zones of intervention for guiding learners in ISP The Information Search Process revisited: Is the model still useful?” (2008) Heinstrom &Todd) Clyde (1997) primary purpose of library homepage instructional delivering information skills--essential skills of the information age

School library websites & their instructional potential:

School library websites & their instructional potential Smaller community, shared learning culture Customization: one (two) voices behind site, with Knowledge of users ‘ needs Knowledge of teachers’ styles Knowledge of broad curriculum & inquiry culture Established relationships True potential for hybrid learning experiences Opportunity to introduce virtual library service to young library users Need greater? Users’ cognitive skills less fully developed

Content analysis & school library websites:

Content analysis & school library websites Simpson (2001) school virtual library practice in Texas. Sites differed dramatically. Many clearly missing features, others “ stellar examples, ” some serving as “ placeholders, ” others “ active, changing, and fully featured. ” Web presence should be “ as carefully developed as the library it represents. ” Clyde (1999, 2001, 2004) longitudinal research Rationale for websites: demonstrating role of librarian in information skills development; contributing to development of school information center on Web; seizing critical opportunity to promote school library and information technology skills staff; promoting collections, activities, and services; offering guides to information sources in such forms as pathfinders, style sheets, tutorials; and making the library catalog widely available. Sites varied dramatically in quality and content. Confused about audience and purpose

Clyde’s longitudinal study:

Clyde ’ s longitudinal study 1996 baseline content analysis of 50 randomly-selected sites--snapshot of state-of–the-art Attempted to identify popular pages and features, point to effective design models, develop quality indicators Sites varied a great deal--most lacked purpose, did not identify user needs. 1999—37 remaining sites still varied in aim & purpose. 2002—32 remaining Despite access to electronic resources--databases, OPACs , discrepancies still dramatic: general lack of purpose

Move beyond feature counting:

Move beyond feature counting While Clyde (1999, 2001, 2004) listed site features and their frequency, she made no attempt to create a taxonomy of this content, or to separate content from format, features from characteristics

Research questions::

Research questions: 1. What models of exemplary practice exist in school library websites? 2. What common features are presented in sites representing exemplary practice? 3. What common organizational structures and design characteristics are employed in exemplary school library sites? 4. From the models observed in sites identified as exemplary practice, can a functional descriptive taxonomy of features be developed? 5. How are school library sites evolving? How do the features and services offered by exemplary sites in 2006 differ from the state-of-the-art of the randomly selected sites last studied by Clyde in 2002? 6. How do exemplary school library sites represent roles of traditional school library program as expressed in current national standards document Information Power (AASL & AECT, 1998)?

Two coding schemes:

Two coding schemes Features / Content coding scheme —such features as: access to subscription databases, instructional units, readers ’ advisory, pathfinders, e-book collections, OPAC, email help, reports, policies, calendars. Form / Characteristics coding scheme --use of blogs, wikis, video, navigational strategies—pull-down menus, mouse-overs, image maps--interactive forms, virtual reality elements, etc.

Features (seriously excerpted):

Features (seriously excerpted) Information access and delivery OPACS, Federated search? Pathfinders Ask-a-librarian Databases (video, ebooks , journals, reference) Search tools Reference News (local, national, international, RSS) Personal help Learning and teaching Information fluency instruction Questioning, searching, evaluation, documentation, synthesis Study process guides Test prep Homework help Student work Orientation WebQuests , learning objects, PowerPoints For parents For teachers Books and reading Readers ’ advisory Reading lists New materials Book discussion/ Booktalks Contests Support of school-wide reading program Program administration General: Contact, hours, mission, welcome, staff, FAQs Policies Schedule /calendar Newsletter Promotional materials Reports Surveys Materials suggestion forms Volunteers Events Data mining

Characteristics:

Characteristics Connectedness to school / curriculum Evidence of collaboration Age/grade appropriate WebQuests , PowerPoint instruction, pathfinders Navigation / organization Consistent design, layout CMS vs. traditional html Mouse- overs , embedded explanations, labels, annotations Language: “ Find a magazine ” Map, index Printable, legible, scroll and load issues Aesthetic qualities / appeal for audience Images of students, materials, events Personality, friendliness Color Animation, video elements art, one alternate site rich in student images Interactive elements / communication tools Opportunities for interaction, personalization, feedback Blogs, wikis, podcasts, video Interactive schedules, suggestion forms Freshness Pages updated Speaks current visual language

Delphi concern::

Delphi concern: Despite the consensus for the need, experts felt that the taxonomies might overwhelm average practitioner.

Implications:

Implications Hybrid practice is a professional mandate—translate the program! Websites should focus on learning Better design critical Support from vendors and larger institutions? University programs should prepare TLs for hybrid practice Need for models and quality indicators

In 2012:

In 2012 Practice continues as varied & spotty, but . . . ReadWrite tools have improved, many are free Proliferation of ebooks , etexts , media, ecurricula , databases Core curriculum movement School libraries threatened Need for scaled, transparent practice Curation is a movement! School libraries can be mobile

PowerPoint Presentation:

Make users smarter? Make systems smarter?

Project Info Lit @ UW iSchool:

Project Info Lit @ UW iSchool The relatively consistent pattern of information usage suggests that most students in our study favored a risk-averse and predictable information-seeking strategy. The student approach appears to be learned by rote and reliant on using a small set of resources nearly each and every time. How College Students Seek Information in the Digital Age (Head and Eisenberg, 2009)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Always on: Libraries in a world of permanent connectivity. (Dempsey, 2009) The library needs a brand which is meaningful and engaging, which communicates its value, and which transcends the caricatural impression many have based around the building and print collections.

BIG PICTURE:

BIG PICTURE “How True Did Our Crystal Ball Read.”30 Nov. 2010. Well and Good . http:// wellandgoodnyc.com /2010/11/30/wellgood-revisits-our-2010-wellness-predictions-were-we-right/>

PowerPoint Presentation:

sweet spots

PowerPoint Presentation:

curation movement (for us and them)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Lopes de Santos, Jaci. “Book Photo.” 22 Aug. 2011. Flickr. Web. 22 Oct. 2011. <http://www.flickr.com/photos/turatti/6070090095/>. Not our only brand !

PowerPoint Presentation:

Digital Collection Curation

PowerPoint Presentation:

blogs # books videos wikis journal articles tweets podcasts mobile apps aggregated content infographics google docs ebooks presentations s tudent work digital storytelling publishing tools museum collections So much stuff! !

PowerPoint Presentation:

“It’s not information overload. It’s filter failure.” Clay Shirky

PowerPoint Presentation:

Traditional library collecting implies organizing a collection of resources for lots of users for multiple purposes.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Curating: Targeted & selective Like telling a story (with voice & context) Like staging museum exhibit

PowerPoint Presentation:

Curation comes up when people realize that it isn’t just about information seeking, it’s also about synchronizing a community . Part of the reason that human curation is so critical is simply the vast number of people who are now making and sharing media. Everyone is a media outlet. Clay Shirky (NYU Professor, blogger, author) http://mashable.com/2010/05/03/content-curation-creation/

PowerPoint Presentation:

Magic Madzik. “My Mess.” 25 Feb. 2009. Flickr . Web. 26 Sep. 2011. <http://www.flickr.com/photos/cefeida/3310344604/> .

PowerPoint Presentation:

“Binghamton University Libraries. “Book Collection.” 26 Feb. 2008 . Flickr . Web. 27 Sep. 2011. <http://www.flickr.com/photos/binglib/2342692311/>.

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://www.thewrap.com/blog-post/art-steal-director-talks-barnes-foundation-15440 The first time I walked into the main gallery at the Barnes, I got chills. To this day, every time I go, I’m reminded how powerful and important this place is. It’s not just a bunch of paintings on a wall -- rather, the entire collection is itself a work of art.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Trusted guide !

PowerPoint Presentation:

66 http://sdst.libguides.com/researchtools

PowerPoint Presentation:

70

PowerPoint Presentation:

Curating with Students

PowerPoint Presentation:

Are we building knowledge citizens ? PL: We say that today everybody becomes and author for example or that everybody because an editor or publisher. And I think that we should stress also that everybody is becoming a specialist in library science. Because when you can thinkerize (?) some information, you do it for yourself to organize your memory but at the same time you organize the memory for others. Every time that you that create a link, every time that you put a tag, you are organizing the common memory. You exercise the role of the keeper of a library. So this is a very new thing and I think that the question of categorization is very important. You do it in a conscious way. HR: So it sounds like you are talking about something for which we don’t have a word yet, that’s kind of like a knowledge citizen . PL: That’s it, yes. A citizen of the knowledge society. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8kCV4EEy2IE&t=11m50s

PowerPoint Presentation:

INADEQUATE

PowerPoint Presentation:

https://sites.google.com/site/knowledgebuildingcenter/ Learning Commons Examples Personal learning environments Digital portfolios

PowerPoint Presentation:

Carol Collier Kuhlthau Information Search Process. 2004 Online zones of intervention?

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://seniorsemdougk.wikispaces.com/Project+Portfolio

PowerPoint Presentation:

80

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://suzannahwseniorthesis.wikispaces.com/

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://scottaxeltextbook.wikispaces.com/4.+The+Great+Recession

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/ 96705 http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/ 96705

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://www.apple.com/ibooks-author /

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://palibraries.libguides.com/youngadultlit

PowerPoint Presentation:

89 http://sdst.libguides.com/content.php?pid=184760&sid=1555558

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://libraryschool.campusguides.com/tlguides

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://libraryschool.campusguides.com/content.php?pid=223148&sid=1851755

PowerPoint Presentation:

“Binghamton University Libraries. “Book Collection.” 26 Feb. 2008 . Flickr . Web. 27 Sep. 2011. <http://www.flickr.com/photos/binglib/2342692311/>. LSTA funded: Public & school project PA Digital Collection Curation

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://palibraries.libguides.com/curation

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://palibraries.libguides.com/civilwar

PowerPoint Presentation:

95

PowerPoint Presentation:

Not just librarians’ work http://palibraries.libguides.com/content.php?pid=244745&sid=2080515

PowerPoint Presentation:

Deb reflected: The product was intuitive and easy to use even though some participants were nervous about technology.  Once they got in and developed some of content boxes, we heard sighs of relief.  “Hey I can do this.  In fact, a women about two days from retirement, was the first to share her page. ” Deb described the connection between transparency and advocacy. What do you do as a school librarian? I can talk about that for hours.  But I can show it to you in 30 seconds.  This type of curation is an advocacy tool. Sara Cantor, one of our pioneer trainers, responded to a LibGuides query on our state school library list: I like LibGuides for many reasons!  They make it so easy to customize resources for specific classes and projects because you can easily move your own content around to new pages within the guide. Also, embedding any kind of html code is super user-friendly even if you are not an html expert. Teachers love when you create guides for their classes and the great part is that it doesn’t take much time!  Students and teachers like the organization and accessibility of LibGuides which are now linked to my main library site.  I definitely think the increased usage of our databases and e-books justifies the small amount spent on LibGuides !

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://www.bcps.org/offices/lis/feebased/ index.html

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://www.bcps.org/offices/lis/researchcourse/ steps.html

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://thedaringlibrarian.wikispaces.com /

PowerPoint Presentation:

The mobile device will be the primary connection tool to the internet for most people in the world in 2020. ( Rainie & Anderson, Pew Internet & American Life. Future of the Internet III http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2008/The-Future-of-the-Internet-III.aspx)

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2012/1/prweb9119090. htm

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://www.bcps.org/offices/lis/feebased /

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://app.cat/download/? 538c4aa6112cd8e330444dcf60e42cb0 https://pikesvillehslibrary.pbworks.com/w/page/16805677/ HomePage

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://sdst.libguides.com/mobile/ 1552

PowerPoint Presentation:

What would they want it to look like?

PowerPoint Presentation:

new understandings of digital youth n

PowerPoint Presentation:

I.C.U. “Spiderman.” 24 May 2008. Flickr. 12 Feb. 2012. < http :// www.flickr.com / photos /9744731@N05/ 2558144619> . Master of the Web Identity play with an avatar Publishes his photos & contributes: geeks out Interacts with all ages Constantly in contact with MJ & friends Monitors suspicious activity in community Wants to actively participate Learning to use emerging powers Makes mistakes, but could be a hero Jenkins http:// henryjenkins.org /2011/11/ ourspace_being_a_responsible_c.html

PowerPoint Presentation:

Lee, Stan and Steve Ditko .. “Uncle Ben.” Aug. 1962 . Wikipedia . 12 Feb. 2012 . Web. <http :// en.wikipedia.org /wiki/ Uncle_Ben >. with great power comes great responsibility! Uncle Ben (Voltaire, Luke?)

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gforsythe/5689393230/sizes/l/in/photostream /

Pew Internet and American Life:

Pew Internet and American Life Digital Disconnect (Levin, Arafeh , Henhart , & Rainie , 2002) Students prefer Internet for research & homework More connected than their schools & teachers Internet Goes to College (Jones & Madden 2002) Students using computer lab for academic-related work made use of commercial search engines rather than university & library sites. Teens and Technology ( Lenhart , Madden, & Hitlin , 2005) teens enveloped in a wired world, 9 of 10 teens connected Social Networking Websites and Teens ( Lenhart & Madden, 2007) More than half teens use social networking software to communicate Students and Technology (Smith, Rainie , Zickuhr , 2011) College students lead the way in tech and gadget use. Community college students do not use digital tools as much as four-year college students and grad students. Teens Kindness and Cruelty on Social Networking Sites ( Lenhart , et al, 2011) Teens are mostly kind. Speaking the Language of the Next Generation ( Rainie , 2012) Patterns of gathering and creating information different in the digital age.

Lee Rainie, Pew Internet & American Life Libraries and learning communities (2011) :

Lee Rainie , Pew Internet & American Life Libraries and learning communities (2011) Future of reference expertise? Embedded librarian” in learning communities Librarian as scout for relevant material Reviewer and synthesizer Organizer and taxonomy creator On call for just-in-time information Organizational “steward” of bonding capital & of bridging capital Knowledge concierge/ valet in learning communities Librarian as teacher of social media Librarian as fact checker, transparency assessor, relevance arbiter Librarian as aggregator and curator What is the future of learning spaces ? Attuned to networked individuals/ learners. More self directed, less top-down Better arrayed to capture new information inputs More reliant on feedback and response More inclined to collaboration More open to cross discipline insights & creating their own “tagged” taxonomies More oriented towards people being their own individual nodes of production http://www.pewinternet.org/Presentations/2011/Oct/Internet-Librarian.aspx

PowerPoint Presentation:

Technologies to Watch Near term Cloud computing Mobiles Second adoption 3. Game –based learning 4. Open content Far-term horizons 5. Learning analytics 6. Personal learning environments http://www.nmc.org/publications/horizon-report-2011-k-12-edition

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=11889

PowerPoint Presentation:

Friendship-driven and interest-driven online participation have very different kinds of social connotations. For example, whereas friendship-driven activities center upon peer culture, adult participation is more welcomed in the latter more “geeky” forms of learning. Digital Youth Project Final Report http://digitalyouth.ischool.berkeley.edu/report

PowerPoint Presentation:

Mimi Ito. DML Research Hub http ://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuV7zcXigAI&feature= related

PowerPoint Presentation:

Is it wise to cross the streams ? Ghostbusters (1984) Columbia Tristar Home Video. Dir. Ivan Reitman

Ito, Mimi, et al. Digital Youth Project, 2008 (MacArthur Foundation:

Ito, Mimi, et al. Digital Youth Project, 2008 (MacArthur Foundation Most kids involved in friendship-driven, hanging out participation By exploring new interests, tinkering, and messing around with new forms of media , teens acquire various forms of technical and media literacy. Some kids using this literacy as a jumping off point for more geeking out —creative, intellectual--forms of participation using media literacy Kids do not welcome activity in the friendship-driven space (creepy) Missing piece—how to support the geeking out space to foster intellectual involvement and civic engagement

PowerPoint Presentation:

Learner issues across the literature (a meta-look) Designing effective search strategies / Representing information needs, generating search terms Identifying searchable topics and questions Awareness of age/curriculum-appropriate electronic resources--reliance only on commercial search engines Mismatch between students ’ ideas about information and how information is actually organized Understanding that not everything may not be instantly & digitally available Judging relevance and authority Repetition of flawed strategies ( it ’ s the search engine ’ s fault) Strategies for facing overload in both results and dense text Need for scaffolding, instructional intervention

Systems and young users:

Systems and young users Users are most successful when interacting with systems designed for them (Hirsh, 1997) Understand the users, multiple entry/search points ( Marchionini , G., Plaisant , C., & Komlodi , A., 2003) Standardized terminology, better directions, context-sensitive supports ( Neuman , 2003) Design criteria for youth Web portals--four headings: portal goals, visual design, information architecture, personalization. cater to both educational and entertainment needs attractive screen designs, effective use of color, graphics, animation provide keyword search facilities and browseable subject categories allow individual user personalization--color and graphics. (Large, Beheshti , Rahman , 2002)

PowerPoint Presentation:

GEEKING OUT: creation , transliteracy , transmedia storytelling, student work as collection

PowerPoint Presentation:

Create! Make meaning! Solve problems for your community! Eddie van D.

PowerPoint Presentation:

audience changes everything

PowerPoint Presentation:

Enoch Pratt Free Library Pratt Library. “Inside Library Branch 13.” Flickr . 8 Apr. 2010. 10 Feb. 2011. < http :// www.flickr.com / photos /37361031@N02/ 4515011225> Libraries are changing/should change from . . .

PowerPoint Presentation:

Hugo, Nancy. “Arts and Crafts Kitchen.” 8 Mar. 2007. Flickr. 18 Mar. 2010. <http:// www.flickr.com /photos/7293578@N02/444867414 >.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Get

PowerPoint Presentation:

Make

PowerPoint Presentation:

Taste

PowerPoint Presentation:

SMELL

PowerPoint Presentation:

Collaborate

PowerPoint Presentation:

CREATE

PowerPoint Presentation:

Bang the pots and pans

PowerPoint Presentation:

Invent new recipes

PowerPoint Presentation:

Make a mess

PowerPoint Presentation:

SHARE

PowerPoint Presentation:

Peattie , Jo. “Larder.” 5 March 2009. Flickr . <http://www.flickr.com/photos/76812925@N00/3331045752/>.

PowerPoint Presentation:

COLLECTION=Pantry?

PowerPoint Presentation:

147

PowerPoint Presentation:

digital storytelling Information ethics information seeking/ research analysis, evaluation, synthesis of information communication of new knowledge reading— audiobooks, ebooks, blogs collaboration widgets equity of access intellectual freedom inquiry

PowerPoint Presentation:

The largest classroom in your school, or your . . .

PowerPoint Presentation:

Libratory

PowerPoint Presentation:

TRANSFORMATIONAL

PowerPoint Presentation:

PARTICIPATORY l earning spaces

PowerPoint Presentation:

(trans)literacy learning hub production center flexible space inquiry launch pad innovation center LEARNING COMMONS transparent ubiquitous learner centered always open information leadership iCentre libratory

PowerPoint Presentation:

The ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools, and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film, to digital social networks. . . A transliterate person is one who is literate across multiple media. Tranliteracy Research Group http://nlabnetworks.typepad.com/transliteracy/

Henry Jenkins: Skills needed for full involvement:

Henry Jenkins: Skills needed for full involvement Play Performance Simulation Appropriation Multitasking Distributed Cognition Judgment Transmedia Navigation Networking Negotiation

PowerPoint Presentation:

Jenkins on participatory culture: 1 . relatively low barriers to artistic expression and civic engagement 2. strong support for creating and sharing what you create with others 3. informal mentorship whereby what is known by the most experienced gets passed along to newbies and novices 4. members feel that their contributions matter 5. members feel some degree of social connection with each other. Not every member needs to contribute but all need to feel that they are free to contribute when they are ready and that what they contribute will be appropriately valued if they do . Jenkins. From participatory culture to participatory democracy. http:// www.henryjenkins.org /2007/03/from_participatatory_culture_t_1.html

PowerPoint Presentation:

Making stuff is the killer app .

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://youmediachicago.org http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/content/publications.php?pub_id=155 (50) (9)

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://vimeo.com/6214459

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://www.techlearning.com/default.aspx?tabid=67&entryid=62

PowerPoint Presentation:

166

PowerPoint Presentation:

167

PowerPoint Presentation:

-Add new curved plastic laminate top over existing 42”h double face bookcases facing instructional area (196-1/2 x 36” x 1-1/4” +/-). -Move & modify adjustable shelves within existing shelving to allow for power rough-in options (will not change current volume count). -Power rough-in and final connection by SD, this can be connected to power/data ports or SD supplied devices.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Create space not hostile to learning Recognize the social learning happening in the social space Learning outside of school matters to learning in school How can we actively link home/social learning with school learning Giving kids access to baseline set of standards, literacies, opportunities to reflect. New opportunities for schools to harness opportunities in informal learning

PowerPoint Presentation:

Transmedia Storytelling represents a process where integral elements of a fiction get dispersed systematically across multiple delivery channels for the purpose of creating a unified and coordinated entertainment experience. Ideally, each medium makes it own unique contribution to the unfolding of the story. Henry Jenkins http://www.henryjenkins.org/2007/03/transmedia_storytelling_101.html

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://youtu.be/_jZVE5uF24Q

PowerPoint Presentation:

Aaron’s transmedia story of Darfur http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMz- 9HxBfyg

PowerPoint Presentation:

l earning is playful

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://fold.it/portal/info/ science http://www.gamesforchange.org / http://playspent.org / http://www.freerice.com/# /

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://vodpod.com/watch/5801042-vwbpe-as-the-worldz-turn-peggy- sheehy

PowerPoint Presentation:

http:// arisgames.org ARIS is a user-friendly, open-source platform for creating and playing mobile games, tours and interactive stories.

PowerPoint Presentation:

' Who Needs Books? ' http://www.flickr.com/photos/46213661@N00/6175154545

PowerPoint Presentation:

reading as a social activity

PowerPoint Presentation:

Erin Agnew The reading experience, the relationship between author and reader, and the book itself are evolving. And this shift means that many young people are embracing books and reading as never before. Valenza & Stephens. “Reading Remixed: Far from killing reading, digital technologies are helping young readers become more engaged in books than ever.” Educational Leadership . Mar. 2012.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Readers are different. Fandom has changed the way readers engage with fiction. The new reader is vocal and social. Not simply content to merely love a book, the reader wants to actively celebrate what they read. So, if they find a title they love, they’ll not only recommend it to a friend, they’ll also discuss it online via a social networking site. They’ll likely also create fan art or write fan fiction. They’ll dress up as a beloved character ( cosplay ). Stories can grow beyond the page and transform because of new reciprocal relationships between authors and reader. Fans can approach the role of collaborator--to co-create in the author’s fictional world. Though reading continues as a personal and idiosyncratic experience, social networking promotes fan communities. James Kennedy ( The Order of the Odd-Fish , Random House/90-Second Newbery Festival)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Jessie Adams

PowerPoint Presentation:

We believe authors, illustrators, and those with whom they work will find more creative ways to promote interactivity, connectivity, and access in hand-held books. We believe children will continue to expect these qualities in their books, just as they do in the digital resources they encounter. ( Dresang and McClelland,1999) On Radical Change— interactivity , connectivity , and access:

PowerPoint Presentation:

A decade and a half later this perspective continues to ring true with literally hundreds of additional examples of how the digital world and its current 2.0 connections have nurtured the capabilities and preferences of children and how adults have partnered with them in creating more and more resources that successfully incorporate digital age principles. There is no end in sight. Eliza Dresang (interview with Valenza and Stephens)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Before students can engage with the new participatory culture, they must be able to read and write. Just as the emergence of written language changed oral traditions and the emergence of printed texts changed our relationship to written language, the emergence of new digital modes of expression changes our relationship to printed texts. (Jenkins, 21)

PowerPoint Presentation:

# swvbc

PowerPoint Presentation:

connectivism : learning as a social activity

Siemens Connectivism :

Siemens Connectivism Students learn by building learning networks Learning is based on connections, relationships Integrated process of connection building Ability to build knowledge/learn based on ability to pull things together Sense-making, way finding We need to understand networks learners are forming http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-XlZ95uMp0

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://thehpalliance.org/ http://nerdfighters.ning.com/

PowerPoint Presentation:

Lauren on connecting with authors On being a Nerdfighter -- fan of awesome and combatant against suck. John Green will go on blog tv and chat with his readers, read teasers from a new book. Before Paper Towns was finished, he shared sections he was writing. A while back, he read two opening chapters and asked readers to decide which book he should focus on. On Maureen Johnson [Johnson is] an absolute nut case, in the best way possible. She discusses how hamsters are controlling her deadlines and how she has to pack for this trip in about two hours. I discovered Libba Bray through Maureen Johnson’s tweets (http:// twitter.com/maureenjohnson ). She was talking about [Bray’s novel] Beauty Queens [and it sounded] completely amazing. She said it’s exactly the book she wished she had as a teenager. Online interactions with authors have given Lauren a behind-the-scenes view of how books are born, as was the case with the Zombies vs. Unicorns anthology (http:// pages.simonandschuster.com/zombiesvsunicorns ), which began with a debate between authors Holly Black and Justine Larbalestier and their fans over which was better, unicorns or zombies. Both authors pulled together teams of authors to write short stories about both creatures and published them in an anthology with prefaces to each story by Black and Larbalestier that detail how the portrayal of both creatures vary from story to story and how the symbolism around both creatures varies--plus some hilarious zombie vs. unicorns smacktalk . Zombies totally won .

PowerPoint Presentation:

Lauren on social action Interactions between authors and fans aren’t simply for silly, shenanigans. They can do incredible good. The Harry Potter Alliance, started by Andrew Slack, seeks to spread the message of love found in the Harry Potter books through charity work. They see themselves as a kind of “Dumbledore’s Army” for the real world. Maureen Johnson asked fans to give money to the Red Cross or ShelterBox after the earthquake in Japan and tornado in Joplin, Missouri. Donors were entered into a drawing for prizes donated by authors that included advance reader’s copies, signed books, college essay help, and feedback on novels in progress. John and Hank Green’s Project for Awesome ( www.projectforawesome.com ) encouraged fans to create videos supporting favorite charities, and Readergirlz ’ Operation Teen Book Drop ( www.readergirlz.com/tbd.html ) donated over 30,000 new young adult books to underserved teens. The # yasaves Twitter campaign, sparked by Meghan Cox Gurden’s June 4 Wall Street Journal article (Link to http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303657404576357622592697038.html), galvanized readers in support of literature that speaks to many teens’ real-life concerns.

PowerPoint Presentation:

On reading and community Lauren has a long-running pen-pal relationship with a girl in Singapore, developed through her Tumblr blog. They bonded over a mutual love of Harry Potter and the Leaky Cauldron --the largest of the Harry Potter–themed social networks. Lauren also loves Goodreads ): It’s a whole, cool community of readers that didn’t exist a few years ago. You can write reviews, read other people’s reviews, and look at other people’s taste . On fanfiction It lets people do things with characters that they already like, and it gives young writers a way t o get recognition for what they write. For instance, Cassandra Clare, who wrote long fan fiction about Draco Malfoy [one of Lauren’s favorite Harry Potter characters], is now a published author. [In online fanfiction communities], there’s a worldwide connection between other readers and writers. You have an instant audience. It’s an amazing experience for editing. Beta readers from around the world offer feedback and help edit and improve your work and grow as a writer.

PowerPoint Presentation:

s ocial network analysis: communities of practice & interest

PowerPoint Presentation:

# tlchat # swvbc Geek tribe # yalitchat # edchat actors, centrality, betweeness , prestige, bridges, isolates, recopricity , In degree/out degree

PowerPoint Presentation:

digital citizenship

PowerPoint Presentation:

Beyond. “Theresa's Happy Feet.” 7 Nov. 2008. Flickr . <http://www.flickr.com/photos/26104563@N00/3011595479/>

PowerPoint Presentation:

I.C.U. “Spiderman.” 24 May 2008. Flickr. 12 Feb. 2012. < http :// www.flickr.com / photos /9744731@N05/ 2558144619> .

PowerPoint Presentation:

Lee, Stan and Steve Ditko .. “Uncle Ben.” Aug. 1962 . Wikipedia . 12 Feb. 2012 . Web. <http :// en.wikipedia.org /wiki/ Uncle_Ben >. with great power comes great responsibility! Uncle Ben (Voltaire, Luke?)

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://digitalcitizenship.net Mike Ribble

PowerPoint Presentation:

Mike Ribble’s Nine Elements: Digital Access Digital Commerce Digital Communication Digital Literacy Digital Etiquette Digital Law Digital Rights and Responsibilities Digital Health and Wellness Digital Security http://digitalcitizenship.net/Nine_Elements.html

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://www.goodworkproject.org/practice/our-space / Henry Jenkins: As a society, we have spent too much time focused on what media are doing to young people and not enough time asking what young people are doing with media. We need to embrace an approach based on media ethics, one that empowers young people to take greater responsibility for their own actions and holds them accountable for the choices they make as media producers or as members of online communities.... http://henryjenkins.org/2011/11/ourspace_being_a_responsible_c.html

PowerPoint Presentation:

Negotiation —the ability to travel across diverse communities, discerning and respecting multiple perspectives, and grasping and following alternative norms. Judgment— the ability to evaluate the reliability and credibility of different information Simulation —the ability to interpret and construct dynamic models of real world processes. Performance —the ability to adopt alternative identities for the purpose of improvisation and discovery. Networking —the ability to search for, synthesize, and disseminate information; in other words, networking creates opportunities to share with others Collective intelligence —when participants pool knowledge Appropriation —the ability to meaningfully sample and remix media content. Full participants of online communities exercise critical new media literacies .

PowerPoint Presentation:

Our Space is aimed at cultivating the following ethical thinking skills: Perspective-taking, or striving to understand the motives and goals of multiple stakeholders in online communities. Stakeholders might include one’s friends, peers, parents, and teachers; other individuals with whom one interacts online; and the creators, owners, or subjects of content downloaded or accessed online. Reflecting on one’s roles and responsibilities when online—for example, when presenting oneself in an online community; when sharing information about the self and others; when taking action in an online, multiplayer game; when deciding how to respond to something troubling, such as hate speech; and when deciding whether and how to make use of information, music, video, and text accessed online. Considering the potential benefits and harms to communities of various choices online— including those related to conduct and speech, self-presentations, privacy, establishing one’s credibility, assessing the credibility of others, and using online content.

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://thepowerofopen.org

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org/fair-use/best- practices

PowerPoint Presentation:

The mission of the library media program is to ensure that students are effective users [AND PRODUCERS] of ideas and information.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Atienzar , Manuel. Double Standards . 19 Mar. 2004. Flickr . http :// www.flickr.com / photos /14141658@N06/3134375296

“The best way to predict your future is to create it.” Abraham Lincoln:

“The best way to predict your future is to create it.” Abraham Lincoln “How True Did Our Crystal Ball Read.”30 Nov. 2010. Well and Good . http:// wellandgoodnyc.com /2010/11/30/wellgood-revisits-our-2010-wellness-predictions-were-we-right/>

PowerPoint Presentation:

What box?

PowerPoint Presentation:

The digital world is creating new opportunities for youth to grapple with social norms, explore interests, develop technical skills, and experiment with new forms of self-expression. These activities have captured teens’ attention because they provide avenues for extending social worlds, self-directed learning, and independence. Digital Youth Project Final Report http://digitalyouth.ischool.berkeley.edu/report

PowerPoint Presentation:

Ratcliff, Trey. “Stuck in Customs.” 16 May 2006. Flickr. 22 Jan. 2012. < http :// www.flickr.com / photos /95572727@N00/ 150378020> .

PowerPoint Presentation:

Millicent Bystander. “Maggie Two.” 13 May 2006. Flickr. 21 Jan. 2012. < http :// www.flickr.com / photos /14853452@N00/ 210081711>.

PowerPoint Presentation:

on sweet spots

PowerPoint Presentation:

Pruitt, D. Sharon. “Girl Eating Messy Spaghetti.” 8 May 2007. Flickr . 14 Feb. 2011. < http :// www.flickr.com / photos /40645538@N00/ 5008273559>.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Reinbold , Matt. “Smile for the Camera.” 30 Jun. 2007. Flickr. 14 Feb. 2011. < http :// www.flickr.com / photos /98528214@N00/ 673915993>.

This is the best time in the history of time to be a researcher or a librarian or a learner!:

This is the best time in the history of time to be a researcher or a librarian or a learner!

PowerPoint Presentation:

232 Because that's what Hermione does. When in doubt, go to the library. Ron Weasley Bitter, I.M. “HP 24.” 23 July 2007. Flickr. 24 Jan. 2012. <http://www.flickr.com/photos/7990086@N06/881421168>.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Today’s slides: http:// joyceumdvisit.wikispaces.com / My site: http:// springfieldlibrary.wikispaces.com / My blog: http:// blog.schoollibraryjournal.com / neverendingsearch / My tweets: @ joycevalenza My Guides http:// sdst.libguides.com / newtools http:// sdst.libguides.com / researchtools http:// sdst.libguides.com /databases http:// libraryschool.campusguides.com / tlguides

PowerPoint Presentation:

Questions?

PowerPoint Presentation:

New librarianship based NOT on books and artifacts but on knowledge and learning Knowledge is created though conversation. New librarians approach their work as facilitators of conversation; they seek to enrich, capture, store, and disseminate the conversations of their communities. There isn’t a part of the library that isn’t about learning. Learning is a collaborative conversation.