Field Study 5

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Field Study 5 Learning Assessment Strategies:

Field Study 5 Learning Assessment Strategies Created by: Mr. Jorge L. Mayordomo

Episode 1: Assessing Student Learning: The Guiding Principles of Assessment :

Episode 1: Assessing Student Learning: The Guiding Principles of Assessment Assessments measure students' attainment of learning outcomes. Assessments measure the level of student success. There should be a connection between the way students learn the material and the way they are tested on it.

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Assessments should be varied. Assessments include formal and informal evaluations. Students should know the evaluation plan at the beginning of a course.

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Think About! What would these principles look like in practice? Which do you already practice in your classroom? Which are you interested in developing further?

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Notebook: Do your current assessments live up to these six principles? What changes would you have to make to comply?

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Introduction and Intended Outcome: Assessment involves gathering data about the success of the teaching and learning in your classroom. It is a continuous process that provides insight into student learning, gives teachers a basis for making instructional decisions and modifying teaching methods, and helps in assigning grades.

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The best assessments also serve as learning opportunities for students. In this session, you'll learn techniques for gathering data on the teaching and learning in your classroom that will help you assess both your students' learning and your own teaching.

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Intended Outcomes As a result of this learning experience, you should be able to create assessments that focus on intended outcomes and your own teaching.

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Assessing Student Learning: Assessment Flowchart Learning Outcomes Formative Assessment     Summative Assessment Student goals & outcomes; e.g., what students should know or be able to do upon course completion Lesson/module activity evaluation Cumulative, mastery; e.g., midterm/final exam, portfolio, timed performance, evaluation rubric, etc. (From a natural resource technology course) "When you have successfully completed this course, you should be able to obtain 3-D views from aerial photographs and relate the feature on the photos to topographical maps." Discuss geometry of aerial photos Prepare and view stereo pairs Work on scale practice problems Field lab Navigate using aerial photographs Determine scale and area (From a Web/ multimedia course) "Upon completion of the course, students will be able to design and produce original hypertext pages containing text, graphics, and clickable links." Weekly digital image portfolio Quiz: HTML commands Presentation/ critique: Web page design Tracking of hours logged into online course tutorials Digital copies of set of three related Web pages uploaded to student portfolio area Peer evaluation rubric containing five evaluation criteria (From an agriculture course) "After this course, students will be able to collect and analyze data from wind instruments, following industry-standard field testing procedures" Daily reports in field notebooks Lab experiments Quiz: Wind energy terminology Participation in class visit to local industry Final field report Three to five questions on midterm exam relating to wind power equipment

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Looking Back at Your Notebook Look back at what you wrote at the beginning of this module about the assessment methods you use in class and those you might use in the future. Write down the one or two assessment strategies you've learned in this module that can help you meet your goals for a class you are now teaching or about to teach. Talk them over with a classmate.

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Episode 2: Using Appropriate Assessment Tools

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EVALUATION: Appropriate Assessment Methods and Uses Assessment methods and instruments should be selected on the basis of-- the type of information sought; the use to which the information will be put; the developmental level and maturity of the student. The use of assessment data for purposes other than those intended is inappropriate.

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Focus: The purpose of an assessment--to identify areas of difficulty for individual students, to gather data for instructional planning, to assign grades, or to evaluate a program--should dictate the kinds of questions asked, the methods employed, and the uses of the resulting information.

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When one type of measure is used in lieu of another, the information obtained is often invalid or useless. In addition, the methods used to gather information should be appropriate to the developmental level and maturity of the students.

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The assessment of student performance serves many purposes. For the student, assessment aids learning and measures mathematical knowledge and power. For the teacher, it provides information about how instruction should be modified and paced.

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For the administrator, it charts the effectiveness of a program. In addition, the general public expresses concern about academic achievement. Each of these groups asks different questions. Each needs different kinds of information. An assessment designed to answer one kind of question can misrepresent the answer to another.

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Purposes(examples of questions asked) For Whose Use Unit of Assessment Type of Assessment Assessment Methods Diagnostic What does this student understand about the concept or procedure? What aspects of problem solving are causing difficulty? What accounts for this student's unwillingness to attempt new problems or see the application of previously learned materials?       Individual teacher Individual teacher       Individual student Tasks that focus on a specific skill, type of procedure, concept, strategy, or a type of reasoning Each student evaluated Observation Oral questions that ask students to explain their procedures Focused written tasks Directed test items Instructional Feedback What do students know about the material presented? Can students apply their learning to new situations? Do students understand the connections among ideas? How shall I pace instruction? Does the class need more intensive review of more challenging material?           Individual teacher           Class Tasks that require an integration of know- ledge Tasks that cover a range of skills, concepts, and procedures Tasks that require the application of learning to new contexts Problem solving and reasoning tasks Tasks that vary the format and context in which the material is presented Matrix sampling test situations Written tests, including those that require differential methods for solutions to problems Class presentations Extended problem solving projects Observation of class discussion Take-home tests Homework, journals Group work and projects Instructional Feedback What do students know about the material presented?   Can students apply their learning to new situations?   Do students understand the connections among ideas?   How shall I pace instruction?   Does the class need more intensive review or more challenging material?         Individual student Parents School           Individual student Tasks that demand the integration of material that was taught Tasks that are intrinsically interesting and challenging to the student Tasks that require the student to structure the material and generate solutions, in the context of the real world, as well as in math- ematics Extended problem solving projects   Papers or written arguments that demand thoughtful inquiry about a mathematical topic   Written tests that present problems with a range of difficulty based on expectations for course   Oral presentations Generalized mathematical achievement How does the general mathematical capability of this student compare with others or with a national norm?   Parents Teachers Administrators     Individual student Tasks organized in highly reliable tests designed for maximum discrim- ination among students Standardized achievement tests Program Evaluation How effective is this instructional program in achieving our goals for mathematical learning?       Teachers Administrators Other decision makers           Class School Tasks that reflect the intent of the curriculum goals   Tasks that are aligned to the instruct- ional methods and content of the curriculum (see Standards 12 and 13 )   Matrix sampling test situations Student interviews   Performance tests   Criterion referenced tests   Observation of class discussions   Success of students who have completed the program

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Episode 3: On Content Validity of the Test Validity as a characteristics of test means that a test must measure what is supposed to measure is a multiple choice type of test valid to determine learning of manipulative skill like focusing a microscope

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Table of Specification (TOS) is very important in the content for validity of test as it puts the one who gave the test and the candidate on the same footing. This means that both are thinking of the same question, item, specification and other details. This is very important when giving tests that has tendencies of multiple interpretation.

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A multiple type of question may be a good way to determine to know a person`s quality of learning but may not be very applicable to a set of manipulative skills. The best way to test a person`s manipulative skill is to do an actual demonstration. The same type of demo is required for other manipulative test like getting a driver`s license.

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Use activities that enhance critical. Creative and metacognitive Reading skills. Analyze extrinsic and intrinsic factors that affect reading performance. Mrs. Manuel believes in the power of environmental print to develop the pupil’s sight words recognition, print orientation, and even comprehension in meaningful way. Which of the following materials is NOT an example of environmental print? Old boxes of powdered milk Chocolate bar wrappers Car stickers Big books

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Episode 4: On Scoring Rubrics Before implementing scoring rubrics, many teachers and assessors would grade students individually and the notes would be shared privately.

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This gave the teacher-student relationship something closer than what was in the classrooms. The notes the teachers gave to each student`s works were given out on each assignment.

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As a student, this was helpful on a per assignment basis. The notes and critiques were specific and gave a better assessment of what needed to be done for improvement.

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Overall, before the advent of scoring rubrics, students still had the opportunity for in depth evaluation but on a more personal basis.

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Episode 5: On Portfolios What Is a Portfolio? A portfolio is a purposeful collection of student work that exhibits the student's efforts, progress, and achievements in one or more areas of the curriculum. The collection must include the following:

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Student participation in selecting contents. Criteria for selection. Criteria for judging merits. Evidence of a student's self-reflection.

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It should represent a collection of students' best work or best efforts, student-selected samples of work experiences related to outcomes being assessed, and documents according growth and development toward mastering identified outcomes. Paulson, F.L. Paulson, P.R. and Meyer, CA. (1991, February). "What Makes a Portfolio a Portfolio?" Educational Leadership , pp. 60-63.

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Why Use a Portfolio? In this new era of performance assessment related to the monitoring of students' mastery of a core curriculum, portfolios can enhance the assessment process by revealing a range of skills and understandings one students' parts; support instructional goals; reflect change and growth over a period of time; encourage student, teacher, and parent reflection; and provide for continuity in education from one year to the next.

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Instructors can use them for a variety of specific purposes, including: Encouraging self-directed learning. Enlarging the view of what is learned. Fostering learning about learning. Demonstrating progress toward identified outcomes. Creating an intersection for instruction and assessment. Providing a way for students to value themselves as learners. Offering opportunities for peer-supported growth.

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Episode 6: Scoring, Grading, and Communicating Results

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Thank You

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