Teaching of Listening ppt

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The Teaching of Listening : 

The Teaching of Listening An Overview Mr. Jorge L. Mayordomo TIPQC, College of Education

The Teaching of Listening: 

The Teaching of Listening Listening skills are vital for your learners. Of the 'four skills,' listening is by far the most frequently used. Listening and speaking are often taught together, but beginners, especially non-literate ones, should be given more listening than speaking practice.

The Teaching of Listening: 

The Teaching of Listening It's important to speak as close to natural speed as possible, although with beginners some slowing is usually necessary. Without reducing your speaking speed, you can make your language easier to comprehend by simplifying your vocabulary, using shorter sentences, and increasing the number and length of pauses in your speech.

The Teaching of Listening: 

The Teaching of Listening There are many types of listening activities. Those that don't require learners to produce language in response are easier than those that do. Learners can be asked to physically respond to a command (for example, "please open the door"), select an appropriate picture or object, circle the correct letter or word on a worksheet, draw a route on a map, or fill in a chart as they listen.

The Teaching of Listening: 

The Teaching of Listening It's more difficult to repeat back what was heard, translate into the native language, take notes, make an outline, or answer comprehension questions. To add more challenge, learners can continue a story text, solve a problem, perform a similar task with a classmate after listening to a model (for example, order a cake from a bakery), or participate in real-time conversation.

The Teaching of Listening: 

The Teaching of Listening Good listening lessons go beyond the listening task itself with related activities before and after the listening. Here is the basic structure:

The Teaching of Listening: 

The Teaching of Listening Pre/Before Listening Prepare your learners by introducing the topic and finding out what they already know about it. A good way to do this is to have a brainstorming session and some discussion questions related to the topic. Then provide any necessary background information and new vocabulary they will need for the listening activity.

The teaching of Listening: 

The teaching of Listening During Listening Be specific about what students need to listen for. They can listen for selective details or general content, or for an emotional tone such as happy, surprised, or angry. If they are not marking answers or otherwise responding while listening, tell them ahead of time what will be required afterward.

The Teaching of Listening: 

The Teaching of Listening Post/After Listening Finish with an activity to extend the topic and help students remember new vocabulary. This could be a discussion group, craft project, writing task, game, etc.

The Teaching of Listening: 

The Teaching of Listening The following ideas will help make your listening activities successful.

The Teaching of Listening: 

The Teaching of Listening Noise Reduce distractions and noise during the listening segment. You may need to close doors or windows or ask children in the room to be quiet for a few minutes.

The Teaching of Listening: 

The Teaching of Listening Equipment If you are using a cassette player, make sure it produces acceptable sound quality. A counter on the machine will aid tremendously in cueing up tapes. Bring extra batteries or an extension cord with you.

The Teaching of Listening: 

The Teaching of Listening Repetition Read or play the text a total of 2-3 times. Tell students in advance you will repeat it. This will reduce their anxiety about not catching it all the first time. You can also ask them to listen for different information each time through.

The Teaching of Listening: 

The Teaching of Listening Content Unless your text is merely a list of items, talk about the content as well as specific language used. The material should be interesting and appropriate for your class level in topic, speed, and vocabulary. You may need to explain reductions (like ' gonna ' for 'going to') and fillers (like 'um' or 'uh-huh').

The Teaching of listening: 

The Teaching of listening Recording Your Own Tape/CD Write appropriate text (or use something from your textbook) and have another English speaker read it onto tape. Copy the recording three times so you don't need to rewind. The reader should not simply read three times, because students want to hear exact repetition of the pronunciation, intonation, and pace, not just the words.

The Teaching of Listening: 

The Teaching of Listening Video You can play a video clip with the sound off and ask students to make predictions about what dialog is taking place. Then play it again with sound and discuss why they were right or wrong in their predictions. You can also play the sound without the video first, and show the video after students have guessed what is going on.

The Teaching of Listening: 

The Teaching of Listening Homework Give students a listening task to do between classes. Encourage them to listen to public announcements in airports, bus stations, supermarkets, etc. and try to write down what they heard. Tell them the telephone number of a cinema and ask them to write down the playing times of a specific movie. Give them a tape recording of yourself with questions, dictation, or a worksheet to complete.

The Teaching of Listening: 

The Teaching of Listening Look for listening activities from any book about Listening in the Library. If your learners can use a computer with internet access and headphones or speakers, it is a good material for Teaching of Listening. You could also assign specific activities to your learners as homework. Teach new vocabulary ahead of time if necessary.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening Imagine that you are teaching a reading lesson on listening to the sounds that letters make. The lesson is going well, and you are complimenting yourself on a great plan--active learning and all. The students seem to be catching on to the concepts when Jesse raises her hand in response to your question. You call on her; she hesitates and then responds, "What did you say?" Around this time, the student behind Jesse has fallen out of his seat, so you know it isn't likely that Max was listening, but he appeared to be.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening How do you address these concerns within the context of an inclusive classroom?

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening An estimated 80% of what we know is acquired through listening (Hunsaker, 1990). Listening is the first of the language skills that most children develop and serves as the foundation for subsequent language arts skills (Linebarger, 2001). Indeed, oral skills (spoken language) and their receptive counterpart, listening, are essential for literacy development.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening Despite its importance, listening has been labeled the forgotten language art for more than 50 years because it is rarely taught in elementary classrooms (Tompkins, 2002). Not surprisingly, Funk and Funk (1989) pointed out that many teachers consider listening to be an area that can be neither taught nor evaluated.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening Strategies for Teaching Listening Skills

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening As the United States becomes more diverse, so do the country's schools. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, nearly one out of five people speak a language other than English at home.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening It is not uncommon to have a plethora of languages spoken in a single school district. In order for these students to succeed academically, they must have good listening skills in the target language (most often English). Creativity and the use of different methods make for strong listening strategies.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening Direct Method In this method, the teacher (or leader) talks or reads directly to the students. This method can be fraught with difficulties for the learner. For this reason, it is advisable to use colorful and interesting visual aids. Another strategy is to point to objects as you speak. Magazine pictures as well as diagrams on the whiteboard can be employed as well. Voice inflection and rhythm should also be varied.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening Total Physical Response S tudents respond with body motions when listening to the teacher. By involving motor skills when listening, the learner has an opportunity to engage another part of his brain in the task. The teacher asks the students to stand up, sit, clap, wave, shake another person's hand, and so on. Coupling the physical response with the auditory cue strengthens the learning.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening Authentic Materials When teachers talk to students, they tend to slow their speech and enunciate more distinctly. This helps build vocabulary, but it doesn't mimic a native speaker. Using authentic materials such as movies or recorded books helps the multicultural student become more fluent in her listening skills. The recorded book has the added bonus of no visual clues, thus having the learner cue in totally on the language.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening Group Activities Group activities are another way to promote listening skills, especially listening to those students who speak English with an accent. By grouping the students differently each time, a variety of accents will be heard. Another benefit of a group activity is the direction given by the teacher. He should give the instructions in English, followed by role playing. First, the teacher role plays with a student. Then two students can act out the task. By seeing and hearing what to do, the student will have higher listening comprehension.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening Cultural Differences Learn to attend to the cultural differences of the learners in your classroom. For example, in United States culture, teachers often expect their students to keep direct eye contact with them. Some cultures find this to be rude. Or English speakers often nod their head when listening one on one. Other cultures do not do this, but the student is still listening. Finding out these differences will maximize your teaching methods.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening Since listening is a receptive skill, in each of these cases the "transaction" is one-directional. That makes these tasks relatively uncomplicated in communicative terms, since there is no negotiation. Even though listening tasks are simple in communicative terms, the technical requirements for various tasks can differ considerably, calling for different kinds of "shots" and the use of various equipment.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening An additional strategy is called TQLR. It consists of the following steps:

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening T -- Tune in The listener must tune in to the speaker and the subject, mentally calling up everything known about the subject and shutting out all distractions.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening Q -- Question The listener should mentally formulate questions. What will this speaker say about this topic? What is the speaker's background? I wonder if the speaker will talk about...?

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening L -- Listen The listener should organize the information as it is received, anticipating what the speaker will say next and reacting mentally to everything heard.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening R -- Review The listener should go over what has been said, summarize, and evaluate constantly. Main ideas should be separated from subordinate ones.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening Students should be able to determine what their purpose should be in any given listening situation. Reasons for Listening Information Instructions Evaluation Pleasure Support and Empathy

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening Teachers can create listening guides to focus students' attention on the content, organization, or devices used by a speaker. The following is an example: Sample Listening Guide Name of student: ______________________________ Nature of spoken presentation: ___________________ Where heard: ________________________________ Name of speaker: _____________________________ Speaker's expressed purpose: Qualifications of speaker: Main Idea(s) presented: Noteworthy features of presentation: In what ways was the talk effective? Ineffective? Why?

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening Formal Assessment Listening More formal listening assessments can be prepared by teachers based on objectives and perceived needs. Some examples follow. 1. Excerpts from different genres of literature (e.g., prose, poetry, play) can be used as follows: Prepare a set of ten questions on the excerpt. Set a purpose for the listening activity (e.g., "Listen to determine the setting of the following passage.").

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening Have students listen to the excerpt (pre-taped or teacher-read). Have students respond in writing to the prepared questions. A score of 70% or better on basic recall and basic inferential questions indicates that the student has comprehended the passage.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening Questions can also be designed to determine if students are comprehending critically and creatively. 2. Students can paraphrase, summarize, analyze, make notes, complete a listening guide, or write a response to a spoken or multimedia presentation. The assessment tasks can be as simple as listing significant ideas and arguments, answering a series of questions, or identifying connotative meanings of key words .

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening They can be as challenging as formulating their own questions; identifying irrelevant details; identifying fallacies, bias, or prejudice; using the information presented and applying it to a new situation; or judging the effects of various devices the speaker may use to influence the listener or viewer.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening Devine (1982) gives examples of other types of listening assessments. After placing ten details on the chalkboard, the teacher reads a ten-minute story aloud. After listening to the story, students are asked to jot down the four or five details that are most important to the outcome. The responses provide insights into students' listening ability. Students listen to a story and, afterwards, write down three key qualities of the character and their reasons for selecting these. While listening to the story a second time, the students listen for and record details that prove their assertions about the character.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening 3. Devine (1982) gives examples of other types of listening assessments. After placing ten details on the chalkboard, the teacher reads a ten-minute story aloud. After listening to the story, students are asked to jot down the four or five details that are most important to the outcome. The responses provide insights into students' listening ability.

Strategies for Teaching Listening : 

Strategies for Teaching Listening Students listen to a story and, afterwards, write down three key qualities of the character and their reasons for selecting these. While listening to the story a second time, the students listen for and record details that prove their assertions about the character.