Inquiry Based Learning

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Inquiry Based Learning:

Inquiry Based Learning How to introduce it into your classroom PLC Series 1 Meeting 1

KWL Chart:

KWL Chart On the table with you is a KWL chart Individually fill one out

From: http://notebookingfairy.com/2011/03/k-w-l-graphic-organizer-printable/:

From: http ://notebookingfairy.com/2011/03/k-w-l-graphic-organizer-printable/

Agenda:

Agenda Overview: What is Inquiry Based Learning? What does the Research say? What does Inquiry Based Learning look like? How do we implement Inquiry Based Learning into the classroom? First steps: planning for the first Inquiry Final Assessment Wrap up, next meeting, final thoughts

What you should have with you::

What you should have with you: KWL chart of your class’ previous knowledge of pioneers Resources on Pioneers of various levels and various types Favourite activities for the Pioneers Unit

What is Inquiry Base Learning?:

What is Inquiry Base Learning? Using the Resources on your table create a definition of Inquiry Based Learning. Share with your table Together create a definition together Share with the class

What is Inquiry Based Learning?:

What is Inquiry Based Learning? The definition you created is not only a definition of inquiry based learning, but is also a demonstration of it.

What is Inquiry Based Learning?:

What is Inquiry Based Learning? Inquiry is when students are allowed to explore topics, using a variety of resources to increase their knowledge of a topic, issue or problem. It isn't just about answering a question, it is about the investigation, exploration, research and study. It is enhanced by the community, the discussion, the interaction, each learning from the other.

What is Inquiry Based Learning?:

What is Inquiry Based Learning? Inquiry Based Learning is a dynamic and emergent process that uses a students natural curiosity. This strategy places the students questions and ideas at the centre. Teachers move from the “Sage on the Stage” to the “Guide on the Side”

What is Inquiry Based Learning?:

What is Inquiry Based Learning? Inquiry based learning can be a single lesson on a small topic, or can be a whole unit Questions can be student generated or teacher generated

Research on Inquiry Based Learning:

Research on Inquiry Based Learning This is not a new approach. In fact Socrates (469-399 BCE) encouraged the youth of Athens to ask questions. This method increases motivation, leading to higher engagement and improved understanding ( Hidi , 1990) It increases curiosity and leads to progressively deeper questions and habitual critical thinking (Orr, 2004) Inquiry builds lifelong learning skills that transcend content (www.p21.org)

Research cont’d:

Research cont’d Research shows that Inquiry based learning helps students become more creative, and more independent. ( Kuhne , 1995) Inquiry based learning increases student achievement (GLEF, 2001)

What does Inquiry Based Learning Look like? Classroom:

What does Inquiry Based Learning Look like? Classroom September: walls are almost bare, as students will collaborate to create their learning environments Inquiry flow chart and Q chart posted where students can easily access them As the year progresses student learning will be displayed, including areas to record the various questions the students have come up with. Desks are arranged in fluid groups to encourage the exchange of ideas and information A space in the classroom is reserved as a meeting space for large group information exchanges

Inquiry Based Learning:

Inquiry Based Learning There are 4 phases of inquiry based learning. These stages are fluid and recursive. As students move through the phases they may return to their question to rephrase, or narrow the topic. They may return again later when discussing their learning with their peers.

Part 1: Focus:

Part 1: Focus Initial engagement: Selection of an Inquiry focus, question, topic. When students are engaged in this phase of the inquiry process, they ... Notice, wonder and ask questions about a topic of interest share their thinking and questions with their peers and teachers dialogue about possible ways to learn more re-frame questions make predictions about possible outcomes or answers

When educators are supporting this phase of the student inquiry process they ::

When educators are supporting this phase of the student inquiry process they : Value student thinking strategically model wondering and making predictions listen, observe, and talk with students to assess interests, knowledge and needs Introduce learning tasks that build on prior knowledge and engage students in thinking further about the topic introduce learning tasks that build on prior knowledge and engage students in thinking further about the topic identify a focus connecting a topic to a 'big idea' in curriculum cluster expectations across curriculum that relate to the topic dialogue with students about ways of learning more about the topic provide time for student talk

How does this work?:

How does this work? When starting with Inquiry based learning, use a KWL chart to establish what the students know on the topic Use the gradual release of responsibility. Begin with a KWL chart, what does your class know about the topic? Go through some resources (read a few stories about the topic etc ) and show students where they can find the information. Next Brainstorm possible questions that could be asked about the topic . Use the Q-Chart to help encourage deeper questions.

Q-Chart:

Q-Chart

Part 2: Explore, Investigate:

Part 2: Explore, Investigate When students are engaged in this phase of the inquiry process, they : gather information first-hand in a range of ways and from a variety of sources connect current thinking to previous knowledge clarify and extend questions talk about observations and thinking to generate more questions record information and keep work samples

When educators are supporting this phase of the student inquiry process, they::

When educators are supporting this phase of the student inquiry process, they: introduce tasks in which students use prior knowledge to generate new ideas and explore questions and possibilities extend student thinking with open-ended questions challenge students’ prior knowledge and beliefs model how to plan, observe and reflect encourage students to share their ideas with each other post banks of student questions provide additional information about the topic for students with limited knowledge/experience provide opportunities for peer and self-assessment talk with students about refining/adjusting initial plans

What would this look like in the classroom?:

What would this look like in the classroom? This is the research phase. Students will be gathering information and making their own notes according to their level. Students will be using the level appropriate sources available As students create more questions, keep a record of them and post during a class discussion Have check ins with each student. Where are they in the process? What have they learned? Where are they struggling? Encourage the students to share and collaborate

Part 3:Analyze Summarize, synthesize, draw conclusions, construct new learning:

Part 3:Analyze Summarize, synthesize, draw conclusions, construct new learning When students are engaged in this phase of the inquiry process, they : use information to answer questions and test hypotheses draw conclusions about questions and hypotheses describe characteristics and notice patterns compare, sort, classify and interpret information talk about their learning/concept understanding think about the information to create new questions and hypotheses

When educators are supporting this phase of the student inquiry process, they::

When educators are supporting this phase of the student inquiry process, they: introduce new concepts, processes and skills that relate to the inquiry observe and strategically question students to clarify and extend their thinking provide opportunities for students to demonstrate their understanding, skills and new learning provide a variety of opportunities for self and peer assessment revisit initial questions and thinking with students strategically model ways to describe patterns, analyze information and draw conclusions from a variety of sources

What would this look like in the classroom?:

What would this look like in the classroom? Students use what they have learned to answer the questions, refine them and discuss what they have learned Students prepare for the next phase: Sharing

Part 4: Share the Learning:

Part 4: Share the Learning When students are engaged in this phase of the inquiry process, they : plan ways to express their learning considering a variety of representations articulate connections between prior knowledge and new discoveries answer and refine questions pose new, deeper questions for independent investigation identify avenues for action and application apply understandings to different contexts and situations create opportunities together to celebrate the learning journey reflect on what, how and why learning happened

When educators are supporting this phase of the student inquiry process, they …:

When educators are supporting this phase of the student inquiry process, they … facilitate discussions in which students make connections between prior knowledge and new discoveries emphasize choice, differentiation and high level thinking about the topic challenge and extend students’ understandings and skills provide opportunities for students to demonstrate the progress of their inquiry encourage students to assess their learning and ways of learning evaluate student learning related to curriculum expectations plan , with students, alternative experiences or avenues of inquiry to gain new or deeper insights create opportunities with students to celebrating the learning journey

The process simplified:

T he process simplified

So how do we begin? :

So how do we begin? Today you brought KWL charts filled in with your class on their previous knowledge of Pioneers and questions they had about the Pioneers. What did they know? (most common) What questions did they ask? (most common) What don’t they know?

Stage One: Questioning:

Stage One: Questioning First we need to teach the students how to question In order to teach this we will use the Q chart. All questions should fit on the grid. We want them to shift their questions to higher order questions. When we start out, most question will be basic knowledge question, we want to push them to the yellow or green sections.

PowerPoint Presentation:

Q-chart: http://www.jillycharts.com/products/Q%252dChart.html

Improving Questioning:

Improving Questioning Have the students place their question on the Q chart Then have them reword the question so it moves from the red sections to the yellow or green

Improving Questioning in Action:

Improving Questioning in Action Original Question: What did the Pioneers do? Bumped up to: How did the Pioneers live? Original Question: Why did the Pioneers move to Canada? Bumped up to: Why might someone choose to move to Canada in the 1860’s? Similar Questions, but the bump up gives it more complexity and more depth when answered.

Next: Investigate:

Next: Investigate Students use available resources (books, websites) at their reading level to find information to help them answer the question. Give them the research Jot notes sheet. Have them take quick notes with the information they need (included in your handout)

Next Step: Analysis:

Next Step: Analysis Looking at Bruner’s Inquiry Process chart (which should be posted in the classroom) How does this answer my question? How does it relate to what I know? Do I need to re-work my question further (clarify)? Do I now have more questions?

Next Step: Sharing their work:

Next Step: Sharing their work You have two main choices: Allow students to choose how to share their learning Or Tell the students how to present their information

Creating an Inquiry Unit:

Creating an Inquiry Unit Once students learn how to research, they can conduct more complex topics and create their own questions (with guidance to stay on topic). They will also be able to create their own products to demonstrate learning. Using your favourite activities, as a table, re-work them so the are inquiry based Share with the group

Final Assessment:

Final Assessment You are a Pioneer who is moving to Upper Canada. In your own way tell us about your experiences as you create your homestead in newly opened lands in Southern Ontario by the Thames River. Show where your homestead is on the class map and explain why your family lives their and how you created your homestead. You may show this through dramatic presentation, diary, letters, scrap book, How-to Manual, Museum exhibit, story, or comics. Other options are also possible, please check with your teacher.

Final Assessment:

Final Assessment First Step: What questions do you need to ask in order to complete your assignment? What resources do you need? Use the information available to answer your questions, write down your information onto your jot notes pages After you do your research you can decide how you want to present your learning.

Looking at the final assessment:

Looking at the final assessment What questions do your students need to ask in order to complete this assignment? Where is a good location to live? Why? What if the land I want is already taken? What do I need to do in order of importance? How do I complete each task. Don’t let students get stuck on the final product, research first, then they can decide on how to present it. Have inquiry charts (Bruner etc ) posted so students can reference them

How do I prepare?:

How do I prepare? Post the map, have some sections of land already taken. C harts with the Inquiry process listed posted Q-Charts posted List of websites with information posted Resources available in the classroom Jot notes sheets Folders for students to keep their work in Schedule conferences to check in with students

PowerPoint Presentation:

http://audneal.typepad.com/my_weblog/2010/03/blueprints-brainstorming-themes-organizational-styles.html

Some Resources to Start:

Some Resources to Start http:// www.projects.yrdsb.edu.on.ca/pioneer/home_eng.htm http:// www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/settlement/kids/index-e.html http://www.uwo.ca/museum/documents/pioneers.pdf Discovering Canadian Pioneers A Pioneer Sampler

What skills do the students need in order to be successful?:

What skills do the students need in order to be successful? Self-Regulation Organization Note taking Selecting appropriate resources Picking out the important information

For the Next Meeting:

For the Next Meeting Complete the mini-lesson on how to improve questions. Do mini-inquiry on Why Pioneers chose to move to Canada Have students demonstrating learning by creating a poster to encourage potential Pioneers to move to Canada (bring these with you) Bring their questions (pre-and post lesson)

For the Next Meeting:

For the Next Meeting As student learn about why people migrated in the 1800’s, list: What are they doing well? What are they struggling with? What do they need to learn in order to be successful? What do you need to work more on?

Resources not already given in the presentation:

Resources not already given in the presentation http://www.classroom20.com/group/inquirybasedlearning/forum/topics/relevant-research-on-inquiry

Sources:

Sources GLEF (George Lucas Educational Foundation). (2001) Project-based learning research. Edutopia online. Kuhne , B. (1995) The Barkestorp project: Investigating school library use. School Libraries Worldwide 1(1), 13-27.

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