Two – Year college Student Athletes 1

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Masters Capstone Project

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Two – Year college Student Athletes: An Academic Year in Readiness:

Two – Year college Student Athletes: An Academic Year in Readiness Jim Spillers Azusa Pacific University October 2013

Two-Year College Student Athletes: An Academic Year in Readiness :

Two-Year College Student Athletes: An Academic Year in Readiness Research literature and study’s suggests that community college student-athletes may need more than two-years or four semesters to complete their Associate of Arts Degree (A.A) or the number of transferrable units necessary to transfer. Challenges that may adversely affect this timeline include different levels of academic preparedness, time management challenges related to practice, competition, and travel, NCAA eligibility rules, and psychosocial issues emanating from athletic participation (Ting, 2009). As coaches, support staff, and administrators we must be intentional about student athlete academic success. The academic year in Readiness Study was designed to support this effort.

Purpose:

Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the implementation of an academic year in readiness designed to successfully remediate student athletes who assess into levels of English and math two or more levels below entry college work in those subjects. The central research questions this study examined are as follows: a ) what percentage of community college student athletes are unable to assess into college level English and math . b ) what are the combined transfer and graduation rates for those student athletes deemed as “underprepared” based on English and math assessments . c ) What are the transfer and graduation rates for those student athletes who successfully complete college level English and math courses with a “C” or better . d ) what are the perceptions of student athletes in regards to sitting out of competition for one year in order to remediate their academic deficiency’s.

Literature Review:

Literature Review Oudenhoven, B., (2002). Remediation at the community college: Pressing issues , Uncertain solutions. New Directions for Community Colleges, Spring2002 (117), 35-44. Supports The need for remediation at the Community college level. This literature indicates that remediation is worth the effort. A study of college transcripts showed that 60 percent of the students who needed no remediation graduated, while only 35 percent of those who needed five or more remedial classes graduated. Oudenhoven (2002) concluded that community colleges are the logical place to serve underprepared students. This study supports the need for an academic year in remediation designed to successfully remediate academic deficiencies.

Supportive Literature Cont.:

Supportive Literature Cont. Meyer , S. (2005). Ncaa academic reforms: Maintaining the balance between academics an athletics. Phi Kappa Phi Forum, 15-18   Meyer (2005) details pertinent NCAA academic reform including Proposition 48, initial eligibility, the 40/60/80 rule, dealing with satisfactory progress, and the most recent legislation of the Academic Progress Rate, which tracks graduation statistics. The Authors research is conducted through interviews with acting student athlete academic advisors and board members of the National Association of Academic Advisors for Athletics (N4A). Examines concerns regarding underprepared student athletes and remediation timelines. This study supports the need for a comprehensive Academic Support System for Student Athletes   Focused Academic support Is the Key!

Supportive Literature cont.:

Supportive Literature cont. Horton, D. (2011). Developing an Institutional Culture toward degree attainment for student athletes. New Directions for community colleges, fall (155), 27-33. Horton ( 2011) studies the marginalization of todays community college student Athlete and the perceptions that have systematically served to discredit the term “student Athlete.” Creating a culture of success: “Tradition never Graduates” Using a culture of success to demarginalize student athletes and neutralize negative perceptions. It takes integrity, teamwork, and Commitment to build a culture of success. As we focus on Community student Athletes we are reminded of the words of Johann W. Goethe, “when we treat a man as he is, we make him worse than he is. When we treat him as if he already were what he potentially could be, we make him what he should be” (Kerensky& Melby, 1975,p.59).

Participants:

Participants The participants for this research study consisted of athletic academic advisors and counselors, coaches and athletic administrators from 112 California Community Colleges.

Survey Instrument:

Survey Instrument The Academic Year in readiness (AYIR) survey instrument followed a Mixed Methodology survey format that included demographic, quantitative, and qualitative questions. The first section consisted of 10 demographical questions designed to describe the survey participants. The second section consisted of 15 quantitative questions that were designed using a five point Likert scale that measured responses ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. The third section included two open-ended qualitative questions. These questions were designed to investigate different methods of placement into the AYIR and the opportunity for each participant to provide feedback related to the research topic.

Methodology :

Methodology This study used an electronic survey instrument utilizing Mixed Methodologies to collect quantitative and qualitative data related to the central research questions. The survey was created using an embedded research design to collect quantitative and qualitative data using the same survey instrument (Leedy & Ormrod, 2013). the qualitative data was considered to be supplemental aligning with central research question d. Qualitative Data will be analyzed utilizing an investigative team designed to identify themes within the qualitative data collected.

Conclusions:

Conclusions The academic year in readiness Survey and the resulting Capstone project are designed to investigate programs that will successfully Remediate academically underprepared community college Student Athletes. Community Colleges, based on open access, athletic opportunities, and academic support resources represent the appropriate level to implement academic programs designed to increase student athlete success. Athletics administrators, counselors, Athletic Academic Advisors, and coaches must be intentional with their efforts to meet the academic needs of our student athletes. We must continue to gather data and conduct studies in regards to the community college student athlete to better understand the need and possible interventions. Finally, we must show the Effectiveness of these academic initiatives to the NCAA and the importance of delaying the “eligibility clock” for those participating in these programs.

References:

References Horton , D. (2011). Developing an Institutional Culture toward degree attainment for student athletes. New Directions for community colleges, fall (155 ), 27-33 . Kerensky, v. m., & Melby , E. O. (1975). Education II Revised: social Imperative. Midland, MI: Pendell Leedy, P. D., & Ormrod, J. D. (2013). Practical research: Planning and design (10 th ed .). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Meyer, S. (2005). Ncaa academic reforms: Maintaining the balance between academics an athletics . Phi Kappa Phi Forum, 15-18 Oudenhoven , B., (2002). Remediation at the community college: Pressing issues, Uncertain solutions. New Directions for Community Colleges, spring2002(117 ), 35-44. Ting, S. (2009). Impact of noncognitive factors on first year academic performance and persistence of ncaa division I student athletes. Journal of Humanistic Counseling,   Education & Development. 215-228

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