The Advocacy Foundation, Inc

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The Advocacy Foundation, Inc

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The Advocacy Foundation, Inc.:

The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. Atlanta | Philadelphia (878) 222-0100 Voice | Data | SMS www.TheAdvocacy.Foundation © The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 2006-2016 (All Rights Reserved) 1 Corinthians 6:1-11 Orientation

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Program Development John C Johnson III, Esq. Founder & CEO Signature Programs The Adolescent Law Group The Nonprofit Advisors Group The Collaborative US/ International Administrative Assistant Intake and Assessments A/F Executive Director ALG Lead Attorney & General Counsel NpA Principal Investigator A/F Director of Foreign Affairs Marketing Finance Evaluation The A/F Evidence-Based Programming Initiative The A/F Youth Services Partnership The A/F Coalition for Drug-Free Communities The A/F Fatherhood Coalition The 21 st Century Charter Schools Initiative Legal Missions International Leadership Development The Strategic Partnership Oversight & Networking Committee Prov. 11:14 Esquire@Law : Social Media Mgt Visions Unlimited: Academic Excel Multi-Jurisdictional Juv Ctt : Case Mgt Emory/ Temple/ Rutgers: Court Mgt ROYAL, Inc: Mentorship/ RoP MLK Center:Violence Prev MAVPP : Evaluation Best Practices/ Compliance Community Collaboration 501(c)(3) Acquisition Organizational Development Strategic Planning Fundraising Best Practices Accountability & Compliance The A/F Endowments Initiative The CBO/ FBO Outreach Initiative Representation of Juveniles and Young Adults Expungements, Pardons & Clemency The A/F Youth Court Initiative The A/F Accountability Court Initiative The A/F Second Chance Court Initiative The A/F Drug Court Initiative The Restorative Justice Project The All-Sports Ministry The Sixth Amendment Project The Juvenile Justice Legislative Reform Initiative The ComeUnity ReEngineering Project The e-Advocate Newsletter The e-Advocate Quarterly Scholarships & Missions Copyright © 2006-2016 The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Eph. 6: 10-20 The Philanthropic Search Committee (Social Networking / UBITs / Foundation Center / Capital Gains / Grants.gov) The Advocacy Foundation, Inc Preparing Individuals, Organizations & Communities to Achieve Their Full Potential The Adolescent Law Group Shalamar J Parham, Esq. Lead Atty/ GC Proverbs 31:8-9 Exodus 3:7-9

The Advocacy Foundation, Inc.:

The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. Since its founding in 2003, The Advocacy Foundation has become recognized as an effective provider of support to those who receive our services, having real impact within the communities we serve.  We are currently engaged in many community and faith-based collaborative initiatives, having the overall objective of eradicating all forms of youth violence and correcting injustices everywhere.  3

The Advocacy Foundation, Inc.:

The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. In carrying-out these initiatives, we have adopted the evidence-based strategic framework developed and implemented by the Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP).    The stated objectives are:   Community Mobilization Social Intervention Provision of Opportunities Organizational Change and Development Suppression [of illegal activities] 4

The Advocacy Foundation, Inc.:

The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. Moreover, it is our most fundamental belief that in order to be effective, prevention and intervention strategies must generally be Community Specific, Culturally Relevant, Evidence-Based, and Collaborative .  The Violence Prevention and Intervention programming we employ in implementing this community-enhancing framework include the programs further described throughout our publications, programs and special projects both domestically and internationally. 5

Subdivisions:

Subdivisions The Adolescent Law Group The Nonprofit Advisors Group The Collaborative US/ International The Theological Law Firm Academy Legal Missions International 6

Signature Programs:

Signature Programs The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. The Restorative Justice Project The All-Sports Ministry The Sixth Amendment Project The Juvenile Justice Legislative Reform Initiative The 21 st Century Charter Schools Initiative The ComeUnity ReEngineering Project The e-Advocate Newsletter The e-Advocate Quarterly Scholarships & Missions Discretionary 7

The Adolescent Law Group:

The Adolescent Law Group Proverbs 31:8-9 Representation of Juveniles and Young Adults Expungement, Pardons &Clemency The A/F Youth Court Initiative The A/F Accountability Court Initiative The A/F Second Chance Court Initiative The A/F Drug Court Initiative The Helen E. Davis Pro-Bono Rotation 8

Representation of Juveniles and Young Adults:

Representation of Juveniles and Young Adults The Adolescent Law Group (ALG) provides Juvenile Court legal services for the local indigent community.  These types of services range from delinquency to dependency matters and, due to the nature of the proceedings, may include representation for family members of dependents as well as for those of the accused young persons.  These services will apply to individuals who qualify for them using the “Advocates Minimum Qualification System”, and/or a “Sliding-Fee Scale”, based on a variety of factors including income, access to other legal alternatives, and the type of representation needed. 9

Expungements, Pardons & Clemency:

Expungements, Pardons & Clemency Expungement is the process through which information about an arrest and the result will be removed from a criminal histor y . Expunged arrests are not visible to employers, housing providers, or licensing agencies that are vetting an individual’s criminal history.  Expunged information will still be visible, however, to law enforcement agencies, including prosecutors and courts.   A PARDON is the forgiveness of a crime AND the cancellation of the relevant penalty ; it is usually granted by a head of state (such as a president) or by acts of a parliament or religious authority.   CLEMENCY is the forgiveness of a crime OR the cancellation (in whole or in part) of the penalty associated with it . It is a general concept that encompasses several related procedures: pardoning, commutation, remission and reprieves. 10

The Advocacy Foundation Youth Court Initiative:

The Advocacy Foundation Youth Court Initiative Youth Court is a program in which juvenile offenders are questioned, defended and sentenced by their peers. Currently, there are around 1,200 youth courts in place across the United States with many more being developed. Youth Courts are the fastest growing crime intervention programs in the nation. They offer ways to engage the community in a partnership with the juvenile justice system to respond to juvenile crimes by increasing the awareness of delinquency issues on a local level and by mobilizing community members and youth to take an active role in addressing the problem. In most youth courts, young offenders are referred for sentencing, rather than for a decision of guilt or innocence. Sentences commonly include community service (1-200 hours), jury duty (up to 12 times), restitution, and apologies. Additional sentencing options include counseling, educational workshops on substance abuse or safe driving, essay writing, victim-awareness classes, curfew, drug testing, school attendance, and peer discussion groups. 11

The Advocacy Foundation Accountability Court Initiative:

The Advocacy Foundation Accountability Court Initiative This Project is On The Drawing Board 12

The Advocacy Foundation Second Chance Court Initiative:

The Advocacy Foundation Second Chance Court Initiative This Project is On The Drawing Board 13

The Advocacy Foundation Drug Court Initiative:

The Advocacy Foundation Drug Court Initiative This Project is On The Drawing Board 14

The Helen E. Davis Satellite Series Pro-Bono Rotation:

The Helen E. Davis Satellite Series Pro-Bono Rotation The Outreach Attorney’s Pro-Bono Initiative This Project is On The Drawing Board 15

The Restorative Justice Project:

The Restorative Justice Project Amos 9:11-15 Eradicating Juvenile Delinquency takes a multi-disciplinary approach. The Juvenile Justice system is incredibly overloaded, and Solutions-Based programs are woefully underfunded.  Our precious children, therefore, particularly young people of color, often get the “swift” version of justice whenever they come into contact with the law. 16

The Restorative Justice Project:

The Restorative Justice Project Amos 9:11-15 Decisions to build prison facilities are often based on elementary school test results, and our country incarcerates more of its young than any other nation on earth.  So we at the Foundation labor to pull our young people out of the “school to prison” pipeline, and we then coordinate the efforts of the legal, psychological, governmental and educational professionals needed to bring an end to delinquency. We also educate families, police, local businesses, elected officials, clergy, and schools about restoring whole communities, and we labor to change their thinking about the causes of delinquency with the goal of helping them embrace the idea of restoration for the young people in our care who demonstrate repentance for their mistakes. 17

The Restorative Justice Project:

The Restorative Justice Project Amos 9:11-15 The way we accomplish this is a follows: 1. We vigorously advocate for charges reductions wherever possible in the adjudicatory (court) process, with the ultimate goal of expungement or pardon in order to maximize the chances for our clients to graduate high school and progress into college, military service or the workforce without the stigma of a prison record; 2. We then enroll each young person into a Data-Driven Restorative Justice program designed to facilitate their reintegration back into the community; 3. While the projects are operating, we conduct a wide variety of ComeUnity-Building seminars and workshops on topics ranging from Juvenile Justice to Parental Rights, to Domestic issues to Police friendly contacts, to CBO and FBO accountability and compliance; 4. Throughout the process, we encourage and maintain frequent personal contact between all parties; 5  Throughout the process we conduct a continuum of events and fundraisers designed to facilitate collaboration among professionals and community stakeholders; and 6. We disseminate Quarterly publications, like our e-Advocate series Newsletter and our Quarterly e-Advocate Magazine to all monthly donors in order to facilitate a lifelong learning process on the ever-evolving developments in the Justice system. 18

The Restorative Justice Project:

The Restorative Justice Project Amos 9:11-15   FYI: 1. The national average cost to taxpayers for minimum-security youth incarceration, is around $43,000.00 per child, per year.  2. The average annual cost to taxpayers for maximum-security youth incarceration is well over $148,000.00 per child, per year. - (US News and World Report, December 9, 2014) 3 In every jurisdiction in the nation, the Plea Bargain rate is above 99%. 19

The All-Sports Ministry:

The All-Sports Ministry Clinical studies also show that sports and recreation programs can help youth establish lifelong, healthy, physical activity patterns. Regular physical activity can ward off life-threatening diseases; reduce feelings of depression and anxiety; help control weight and obesity; and build and maintain healthy bones, muscles, and joints, according to the President's Council on Physical Fitness. Through this project our focus is to reduce the personal, social and economic harm caused by substance abuse; tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs, street crime and recidivism. 20

The Sixth Amendment Project:

The Sixth Amendment Project The Nine Main Findings of the American Bar Association 's Hearings on the Right to Counsel in Criminal Proceedings are as follows: I. Forty years after Gideon v. Wainwright, indigent defense in the United States remains in a state of crisis , resulting in a system that lacks fundamental fairness and places poor persons at constant risk of wrongful conviction. II. Funding for indigent defense services is shamefully inadequate . III. Lawyers who provide representation in indigent defense systems sometimes violate their professional duties by failing to furnish competent representation. IV. Lawyers are not provided in numerous proceedings in which a right to counsel exists in accordance with the Constitution and/or state law. Too often, prosecutors seek to obtain waivers of counsel and guilty pleas from unrepresented accused persons, while judges accept and sometimes even encourage waivers of counsel that are not knowing, voluntary, intelligent, and on the record. V. Judges and elected officials often exercise undue influence over indigent defense attorneys , threatening the professional independence of the defense function. VI. Indigent defense systems frequently lack basic oversight and accountability , impairing the provision of uniform, quality services. VII. Efforts to reform indigent defense systems have been most successful when they involve multi-faceted approaches and representatives from a broad spectrum of interests. VIII. The organized bar too often has failed to provide the requisite leadership in the indigent defense area . IX. Model approaches to providing quality indigent defense services exist in this country, but these models often are not adequately funded and cannot be replicated elsewhere absent sufficient financial support. 21

The Juvenile Justice Legislative Reform Initiative:

The Juvenile Justice Legislative Reform Initiative Alternatives to Major Court Involvement In the opinion of the Committee on the Rights of the Child , the obligation of State Parties to promote measures for dealing with children in conflict with the law without resorting to judicial proceedings applies, but is not limited to children who commit minor offences, such as shoplifting, other property offences with limited damage and first-time child offenders, through a range of community-based family support, diversion schemes and restorative justice programs. The Committee points out that such approaches avoid stigmatization, have good outcomes for children and society and are proven to be more cost-effective. Juvenile justice legislation should give the police, prosecutors and judges power to divert children immediately after the first contact and up to the first hearing. 22

The 21st Century Charter Schools Initiative:

The 21 st Century Charter Schools Initiative Charter schools are the fastest growing innovation resulting from education policy to challenge the public schools notion. Chartering sometimes caters to the needs of the community by providing after school activities and programs to keep the student connected to the instructors while increasing their performance in academics and to aid in keeping students out of trouble with authority. For example Drew Charter School in Atlanta, Georgia is attached to their local YMCA program that serves the physical education for the school. Differences in state laws bring wide diversity in the organization, operation, and philosophies of charter schools. Some states give charter schools considerable autonomy, while other states exercise more control. The charter sponsor may be a school district, college or university, state education agency, teachers, parents, or other community members. 23

The ComeUnity ReEngineering Project:

The ComeUnity ReEngineering Project Restorative justice is best applied when circumvented by preventative programs and initiatives that replace blight and hopelessness with achievable high expectations. Education, job creation and affordable housing are primary interventions, proven to redirect underserved/at-risk youth from entering the juvenile justice system – crucial to enhancing the quality socioeconomic growth and development. In addition to award winning achievements in restorative justice, The Advocacy Foundation engages communities through a unique commonsense Community Intelligence and Application (CIA) engagement system. CIA is comprised of a collective of senior level strategist, managers and proven leaders with collectively more 90 years of notable corporate, legal and community service performance; which have accumulated into a unique skill set, proven successful in – “ Bridging The Improbable Into The Extraordinary .” 24

The Nonprofit Advisors Group:

The Nonprofit Advisors Group Ephesians 3:20 501(c)(3) Acquisition Organizational Development Strategic Planning Fundraising Best Practices Accountability & Compliance Evidence-Based Programming The Advocacy Foundation Endowments Initiative The CBO/ FBO Outreach Initiative Seminars and Events 25

501(c)(3) Development:

501(c)(3) Development Creating a nonprofit organization is no easy endeavor. Not only does the organization need to be community and culturally relevant to an existing adverse social condition, but there must also be an agreement by some majority community contingent about the issue(s) the new organization will address, as well as the methods by which it will operate. Then the fun begins! Once there is enough agreement to move forward, the formal process of incorporating and developing its fundability can begin. 26

The Economic Emancipation Empowerment Project for Nonprofits:

The Economic Emancipation Empowerment Project for Nonprofits Just as Reverend Leon H. Sullivan once embraced the idea of Economic Emancipation for people of color, we must now embrace its logical extension, Economic Emancipation for our Community and Faith-Based organizations, many of which arose out of the very movement embraced by our predecessors, in order to help them more fully fulfill their manifest destinies. During the most recent recession, many of our charitable organizations suffered near-fatal setbacks. Most have yet to fully recover, and, unfortunately, some will not ever recover. But there are important lessons-learned in order to prevent the same thing from happening all over again one day. And as we move forward, we must now help them not only to recover, but learn to thrive as well, even in the aftermath of the devastating losses. We must help these organizations break the dependency on government funding and develop their own ability to operate and raise funds independently, while simultaneously helping them learn to ―think outside the box‖ with regard to their sustainability and survival. 27

Organizational Development:

Organizational Development Organization Development (OD) is a deliberately planned, organization-wide effort to increase an organization's effectiveness and/or efficiency and/or to enable the organization to achieve its strategic goals. Organization development is an ongoing, systematic process of implementing effective organizational change. OD is known as both a field of science focused on understanding and managing organizational change and as a field of scientific study and inquiry. It is interdisciplinary in nature and draws on sociology, psychology, particularly industrial and organizational psychology, and theories of motivation, learning, and personality. 28

Strategic Planning:

Strategic Planning Strategic Planning is an organization's process of defining its strategy, or direction, and making decisions on allocating its resources to pursue this strategy, including its capital and people. Various business analysis techniques can be used in strategic planning, including: 1. SWOT analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats); 2. PEST analysis (Political, Economic, Social, and Technological); 3. STEER analysis (Socio-cultural, Technological, Economic, Ecological, and Regulatory factors); and 4. EPISTEL (Environment, Political, Informatic , Social, Technological, Economic and Legal). 29

Fundraising:

Fundraising Fundraising is the process of soliciting and gathering voluntary contributions as money or other resources, by requesting donations from individuals, businesses, charitable foundations, or governmental agencies. Grants and Donations Private Foundation Support Social Networking UBIT’s New methods, such as online fundraising, have also emerged in recent years. 30

Best Practices:

Best Practices Juvenile delinquency in the United States, because of its emphasis on rehabilitation and the remnants of the parens patriae doctrine or the requirement that the state act in the best interest of children, has become an increasingly complex subject. Research in this area is more sociological and behavioral than legal. Some of the causes and conditions of delinquency are obvious: poverty, drugs, gangs, abuse and neglect, and truancy. It is also clear that there are higher rates of detention and probation within minority racial and ethnic groups. However, this understanding only scratches the surface. How do we address these issues in attempting to prevent delinquency? Whose responsibility is it to address these issues? What approaches should be utilized, and who pays? 31

Accountability & Compliance:

Accountability & Compliance Due to the increasing number of regulations and need for operational transparency, organizations are increasingly adopting the use of consolidated and harmonized sets of compliance controls. This approach is used to ensure that all necessary governance requirements can be met without the unnecessary duplication of effort and activity from resources. 32

Evidence-Based Programming:

Evidence-Based Programming Non-governmental and governmental organizations worldwide implement programs to combat social problems, including poverty and lack of adequate health care. However, the programs are often designed and executed based on assumptions rather than based on data and facts. In her TED talk entitled ―Social Experiments to Fight Poverty,‖ MIT economist Esther Duflo compares the implementation of social programs that are not evidence based to the use of leeches by doctors in the medieval period. In some cases, the leeches caused blood loss that exacerbated the patient’s condition. Centuries later, evidence-based medicine and rigorous analysis became central to medical practice. Until recently, social policies and interventions have been developed and implemented based on assumptions rather than evidence. Evidence-based [Social Interventions] are [now] essential. 33

The Advocacy Foundation Endowments Initiative:

The Advocacy Foundation Endowments Initiative A Financial Endowment is a donation of money or property to a not-for-profit organization for the ongoing support of that organization. Usually the endowment is structured so that the principal amount is kept intact while the investment income is available for use, or part of the principal is released each year, which allows for the donation to have an impact over a longer period than if it were spent all at once. An endowment may come with stipulations regarding its usage. 34

The CBO/ FBO Outreach Initiative:

The CBO/ FBO Outreach Initiative This Project is On The Drawing Board 35

Seminars and Events:

Seminars and Events 36

The Collaborative US/ International:

The Collaborative US/ International Amos 9:11-15 Community Collaboration Change Management – Paradigm Shifting The Business Partnership Outreach The Faith Partnership Outreach The UBIT and Capital Gains Initiative 37

Community Collaboration:

Community Collaboration Five-Year Strategic Community Development Plan   Over the next five (5) years, we will accomplish the following:   1. Develop enhanced Evidence-Based programming for:   Nonprofits; Churches; School Systems; Government Municipal Groups (Police, Sheriff, Court and Probationary personnel, and Child-Care Agencies); etc.   2. While developing these programs, we will also continue to:   Represent the Interests of Young People within their local Court, School, and other systems as needed; Educate Community Stakeholders and Professionals about the Alternative to Detention programs we develop; Train Juvenile Justice Professionals with an aptitude and desire to work effectively in the Juvenile Justice system with an emphasis on Restorative and Transformative Justice as well as Community Re-Engineering. 38

Change Management/ Paradigm Shifting:

Change Management/ Paradigm Shifting Innovation! How You Think Is Everything! Question The Answers! Think Waaaaaay Outside the Box! 39

The Business Partnership Outreach:

The Business Partnership Outreach This Project is On The Drawing Board 40

The Faith Partnership Outreach:

The Faith Partnership Outreach This Project is On The Drawing Board 41

The UBIT and Capital Gains Initiative:

The UBIT and Capital Gains Initiative Unrelated Business Income Tax (UBIT) in the U.S. Internal Revenue Code is the tax on unrelated business income, which comes from an activity engaged in by a tax-exempt 26 USCA 501 organization that is not related to the tax-exempt purpose of that organization. Certain types of income are not considered unrelated business income, such as income from dividends; interest; royalties; rental of real property; research for a federal, state, or local government; and charitable contributions, gifts, and grants. In addition, unrelated business income does not include income derived from the work of unpaid volunteers, income from the sale of donated goods, income from trade shows and conventions, income from legal gaming. The Internal Revenue Service does not consider the receipt of assets from a closely related tax-exempt organization to be unrelated business income. The IRS taxes unrelated business income at the corporate tax rates (IRC section 11) except for certain section 511(b)(2) trusts which are taxed at trust tax rates. 42

The Theological Law Firm Academy:

The Theological Law Firm Academy 1 Corinthians 6:1-11 The Theological Origins of Contemporary Judicial Process The Diversity of Theology The Scriptural Application to The Model Criminal Code The Scriptural Application to Tort Reform The Scriptural Application for Juvenile Justice Reform The Scriptural Application of The Canons of Ethics The Scriptural Application to The Uniform Commercial Code The Scriptural Application to The Law of Property The Scriptural Application to The Law of Evidence 43

Preliminary Studies:

Preliminary Studies 44

Courses Year 1:

Courses Year 1 45

Courses Year 2:

Courses Year 2 46

Legal Missions International:

Legal Missions International 47

2017:

2017 48 Public Interest Law US Foreign Policy The United States/ Estados Unidos Domestic Lands Development – Native American Indian Territories International Waters – International Territories International Jurisprudence Military Justice

2018:

2018 Chile India Ethiopia Brazil Jamaica 49

2019:

2019 Indonesia The Caribbean Suriname Cuba Guinea 50

2020:

2020 Russia Sri Lanka South Korea Australia Puerto Rico 51

2021:

2021 Trinidad & Tobago Sierra Leone South Africa Egypt Israel 52

2022:

2022 Costa Rica China Peru Japan Haiti 53

Questions & Answers:

54 Questions & Answers 54

Thank You!:

Thank You! The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. Atlanta | Philadelphia (878) 222-0100 Voice | Data | SMS www.TheAdvocacy.Foundation © The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 2006-2016 (All Rights Reserved) 55 1 Corinthians 6:1-11

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