The Economic Emancipation Empowerment Project for Nonprofits

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The Economic Emancipation Empowerment Project for Nonprofits

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The Economic Emancipation Empowerment Project for Nonprofits:

The Economic Emancipation Empowerment Project for Nonprofits The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. Atlanta | Philadelphia (878) 222-0100 Voice | Data | SMS www.TheAdvocacy.Foundation © The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 2006-2016 (All Rights Reserved)

Biblical Authority:

Biblical Authority Matthew 6:33-34 Deuteronomy 28:11-13 Philippians 4:19 Malachi 3:10-12 2

Introduction:

Introduction Turning the Improbable Into the Exceptional! 3 During the most recent recession, many of our charitable organizations suffered near-fatal setbacks. Most have yet to fully recover, and, unfortunately, some will not ever recover. But there are important lessons-learned in order to prevent the same thing from happening all over again one day. And as we move forward, we must now help them not only to recover, but learn to thrive as well, even in the aftermath of the devastating losses. We must help these organizations break the dependency on government funding and develop their own ability to operate and raise funds independently, while simultaneously helping them learn to “think outside the box” with regard to their sustainability and survival. This project is designed to do exactly that.

The Plight of Nonprofits in the New Millennium:

The Plight of Nonprofits in the New Millennium With the gap between the haves and the have-nots growing by all indicators and government reducing its role in meeting the needs of the poor, the loss of many nonprofits will only exacerbate the situation for those in need. Unless nonprofits teetering on the brink can make up for loss of federal funds with additional nongovernmental funds, the upcoming federal budget deal could be the death blow to many nonprofits that provide direct services to the truly needy. 4

The Plight of Nonprofits in the New Millennium:

The Plight of Nonprofits in the New Millennium "The economy has created such havoc with families who can't afford to feed and clothe their children” Lynn Young Lowcountry Orphan Relief Executive pay can be a tricky subject for nonprofits. Robert G. Smith Goodwill Industries of Lower SC $228,000 William Jenkins The Father to Father Project North Charleston, SC $44,854 5

The Plight of Nonprofits in the New Millennium:

The Plight of Nonprofits in the New Millennium The nonprofit has brought in more money in recent years, but debts and expenses have caused the organization to end those years in the red. - The Father to Father Project The group's net assets shrunk from $265,878 in 2007 to $74,660 in 2009, records show . 6

Outcome-Directed Thinking:

Outcome-Directed Thinking Outcomes Theory provides the conceptual basis for thinking about, and working with outcomes systems of any type. An outcomes system is any system that: identifies; prioritizes; measures; attributes; or hold parties to account for outcomes of any type in any area. 7

Outcome-Directed Thinking:

Outcome-Directed Thinking Outcomes Theory is made up of several key conceptual frameworks and a set of principles. The most important framework is Duignan's Outcomes System Diagram. This diagram identifies seven different building-blocks of outcomes systems. These building-blocks are analogous to the building-blocks that make up accounting systems (e.g. general ledger, assets register). I n the case of an outcomes system they are a different set of building-blocks which are necessary for outcomes systems to function properly. 8

Outcome-Directed Thinking:

Outcome-Directed Thinking The building blocks are: A Model of The High-Level Outcomes Controllable Indicators Not-Necessarily Controllable Indicators Non-Impact Evaluation Impact Evaluation Contracting, Accountability and Performance Management Arrangements Comparative and Economic Evaluation 9

Data-Driven Resource Allocation:

Data-Driven Resource Allocation DIDM refers to the collection and analysis of data to guide decisions that improve success. DIDM is used in education communities (where data is used with the goal of helping students) but is also applicable to (and thus also used in) other fields in which data is used to inform decisions. 10

Data-Driven Resource Allocation:

11 Data-Driven Resource Allocation Most educators, for example, have access to a data system for the purpose of analyzing student data. These data systems present data to educators in an over-the-counter data format (embedding labels, supplemental documentation, and a help system, making key package/display and content decisions) to improve the success of educators’ data-informed decision-making.

Data-Driven Resource Allocation:

12 Data-Driven Resource Allocation “ Data Science and its Relationship to Big Data and Data-Driven Decision Making ”, Foster Provost and Tom Fawcett define data-driven decision making as “the practice of basing decisions on the analysis of data rather than purely on intuition”. Equally succinctly, they view data science “as the connective tissue between data-processing technologies (including those for big data) and data-driven decision making.”

Data-Driven Resource Allocation:

Data-Driven Resource Allocation With operational decisions, we have to learn to distinguish between those situations when decisions can be embedded in automated processes, and those that require human intervention. With strategic decisions we have to learn the difference between complicated but predictable contexts, and complex and intrinsically unpredictable ones . 13

Evidence-Based Programming:

Evidence-Based Programming In her TED talk entitled “Social Experiments to Fight Poverty,” MIT economist Esther Duflo compares the implementation of social programs that are not evidence based to the use of leeches by doctors in the medieval period.  Doctors used leeches due to prevailing assumptions about the body and illness during that period. Sometimes the leeches worked, but they were oftentimes ineffective. In some cases, the leeches caused blood loss that exacerbated the patient’s condition. 14

Evidence-Based Programming:

Evidence-Based Programming Until recently, social policies and interventions have been developed and implemented based on assumptions rather than evidence. Evidence-based [Social Interventions] are [now] essential. The nonprofit organization Innovations For Poverty Action further explains that “Two voids exist in developmental policy: Insufficient Incorporation of Results From Social Science Research, and Insufficient Evaluation (in particular, replication of studies) to learn concretely what works, what does not, and why.”  15

Evidence-Based Programming:

Evidence-Based Programming Some organizations and research centers have recently begun conducting evaluations of various interventions to determine their efficacy in practice, rather than in theory.   Their overall goal is to positively influence the design and implementation of policies and programs by international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and governments.  16

Evidence-Based Programming:

Evidence-Based Programming After a program has been implemented, it is crucial to implement ongoing assessments and evaluations .  Randomized evaluations, which are used extensively by J-PAL, are a type of impact evaluation.  A randomized evaluation may also be known as randomized controlled trials, social experiments, random assignment studies, randomized field trials, and randomized controlled experiments.  In order to determine a program’s impact, it is essential to have a randomly-selected control group of participants who are statistically identical to the experimental group.   Both of the groups are considered microcosms of the larger population and therefore equal in representation to each other. 17 The Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab, Boston, MA (J-PAL)

Evidence-Based Programming:

Evidence-Based Programming Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) is an interdisciplinary approach to clinical practice that has been gaining ground following its formal introduction in 1992. Its basic principles are that: All practical decisions should be made based upon research studies; and That these research studies are to be selected and interpreted according to some specific norms characteristic for EBP. 18

Culturally Relevant Programming:

Culturally Relevant Programming Cultural Competence comprises four components: Awareness of one's own cultural worldview, Attitude towards cultural differences, Knowledge of [various] cultural practices and worldviews, and Cross-cultural skills. Developing cultural competence results in an ability to understand, communicate with, and effectively interact with people across cultures. 19

Culturally Relevant Programming:

20 Culturally Relevant Programming Developing cultural competence requires examining biases and prejudices, developing cross-cultural skills, searching for role models, and spending as much time as possible with other people who share a passion for cultural competence. The term multicultural competence surfaced in a mental health publication by psychologist Paul Pedersen (1988) at least a decade before the term cultural competence became popular. Most of the definitions of cultural competence shared among diversity professionals come from the healthcare industry.

Culturally Relevant Programming:

21 Culturally Relevant Programming Consider the following definitions: A set of congruent behaviors, attitudes and policies that come together as a system, agency or among professionals and enable that system, agency or those professionals to work effectively in cross-cultural situations. Cultural competence requires that organizations have a defined set of values and principles, and demonstrate behaviors, attitudes, policies, and structures that enable them to work effectively cross-culturally. Cultural competence is defined simply as the level of knowledge-based skills required to provide effective services to people from a particular ethnic or racial group. Cultural competence is a developmental process that evolves over an extended period. Both individuals and organizations are at various levels of awareness, knowledge and skills along the cultural competence continuum.

Culturally Relevant Programming:

22 Culturally Relevant Programming Can [we] even measure something like cultural competence? In an attempt to offer solutions for developing cultural competence, Diversity Training University International (DTUI) isolated four cognitive components: Awareness Attitude Knowledge Skills

Social Program Sustainability:

Social Program Sustainability The nonprofit landscape is changing and [we are] faced with real challenge[s]. [We] want to create impact and build a sustainable future, but is it really possible? Experts say, yes! In fact, Jeanne Bell, Jan Masaoka and Steve Zimmerman, authors of Nonprofit Sustainability: Making Strategic Decisions for Financial Viability, say that when nonprofits begin to understand how to bring programmatic goals together with financial goals, they’ll start to make decisions that lead to organizational sustainability. 23

Social Program Sustainability:

24 Social Program Sustainability These experts say that sustainable nonprofits follow these core principles: Financial Sustainability Continuous Decision-Making Development of An Explicit Nonprofit Business Model Effective Management of Hybrid Revenue Strategies

Social Program Sustainability:

Social Program Sustainability According to a recent study by the Weingart Foundation, today’s nonprofits identify the following functions as most in need of attention: Board Leadership and Development Program Evaluation and Strategic Learning Human Resource Development Financial Management Fundraising 25

Social Program Sustainability:

26 Social Program Sustainability Five Ways to Increase Nonprofit Sustainability Stanford Social Innovation Review The Importance of Strategic Clarity and The Steps Your Organization Should Take to Focus On Priorities Diversifying Government Support Streams and How To Manage A Strapped Funding Environment Improving Productivity, Efficiency and Effectiveness Measuring Outcomes and Utilizing Reports to Drive Internal Learning Moving Beyond “ Vendorism ” and Viewing Government Decision Makers As Customers

Inner-Cities Strategic Revitalization Planning:

Inner-Cities Strategic Revitalization Planning Neighborhood Revitalization starts at the grassroots level — with people in the community determining the goals for their neighborhood. ______   It is defined as the process of making something grow, develop, or become successful again (e.g. A new indoor sports arena has played a key role in the revitalization of its neighborhood). - Cambridge Dictionaries Online 27

Inner-Cities Strategic Revitalization Planning:

Inner-Cities Strategic Revitalization Planning One cannot speak of a city's and a people's independence without speaking of their economic independence. The ability of people to obtain jobs and meet their basic needs is a huge determinant of how well that people's culture will flourish. It is difficult to pursue the arts or education if one is impoverished. The rebuilding of inner cities can raise the quality of life for many Americans by bringing businesses that provide jobs and opportunity back to the cities. Also, a city that has a thriving business community has a healthy tax base to support its public education system. The public school is an integral part of revitalization. 28

Inner-Cities Strategic Revitalization Planning:

Inner-Cities Strategic Revitalization Planning 29 Inner city school systems are notorious for their high dropout rates and general difficulty in producing good students. By revitalizing inner cities, parents are given access to jobs and can provide a better home environment for their children.

Inner-Cities Strategic Revitalization Planning:

Inner-Cities Strategic Revitalization Planning 30 Additionally, inner cities have often been characterized as food deserts, where nutritious, low-cost food is difficult to find because large supermarkets refuse to build there. The use of existing infrastructure in revitalization efforts reduces suburban sprawl. Areas that were long ago developed for housing and business are made attractive through remodeling, which is less costly and environmentally destructive than building new homes in the suburbs. Encouraging city living also encourages use of mass transit systems, decreasing reliance on the automobile.

Inner-Cities Strategic Revitalization Planning:

Inner-Cities Strategic Revitalization Planning Suburban living has long been cliched to have sapped the creativity and vitality from our society. There is a grain of truth to this. Suburbanites often do not meet their neighbors and spend a great deal of time driving to their destinations. Urban areas, by design, force people to interact with their surroundings. 31

Critical Thinking for Transformative Justice:

Critical Thinking for Transformative Justice Critical Thinking   Disciplined thinking that is clear, rational, open-minded, and informed by evidence.   - Dictionary.com ______   The National Council for Excellence in Critical Thinking defines it as the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication, as a guide to belief and action. 32

Critical Thinking for Transformative Justice:

Critical Thinking for Transformative Justice 33 Critical thinking can be seen as having two components: A set of information and belief generating and processing skills, and The habit, based on intellectual commitment, of using those skills to guide behavior. It is thus to be contrasted with: The mere acquisition and retention of information alone, because it involves a particular way in which information is sought and treated; The mere possession of a set of skills, because it involves the continual use of them; and The mere use of those skills ("as an exercise") without acceptance of their results.

Critical Thinking for Transformative Justice:

Critical Thinking for Transformative Justice 34 A well cultivated critical thinker:   Raises vital questions and problems, formulating them clearly and precisely; Gathers and assesses relevant information, using abstract ideas to interpret it effectively comes to well-reasoned conclusions and solutions, testing them against relevant criteria and standards; Thinks openmindedly within alternative systems of thought, recognizing and Assessing, as need be, their assumptions, implications, and practical consequences; and Communicates effectively with others in figuring out solutions to complex problems.

Critical Thinking for Transformative Justice:

Critical Thinking for Transformative Justice 35 In a seminal study on critical thinking and education in 1941, Edward Glaser defines critical thinking as follows “The ability to think critically, as conceived in this volume, involves three things:   An attitude of being disposed to consider in a thoughtful way the problems and subjects that come within the range of one's experiences; Knowledge of the methods of logical inquiry and reasoning; and Some skill in applying those methods.

Questions & Answers:

Questions & Answers 36

Thank You!:

Thank You! 37 The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. Atlanta | Philadelphia (878) 222-0100 Voice | Data | SMS www.TheAdvocacy.Foundation © The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 2006-2016 (All Rights Reserved)

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