Inne-Cities Strategic Revitalization - Jobs Training

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Inne-Cities Strategic Revitalization - Jobs Training

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Inner-Cities Strategic Revitalization Part III Jobs Training:

Inner-Cities Strategic Revitalization Part III Jobs Training The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 1735 Market Street, Suite 3750 100 Edgewood Avenue, Suite 1690 Philadelphia, PA 19102 Atlanta, GA 30303 (878) 222-0100 Voice | Data | SMS www.TheAdvocacy.Foundation © The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 2015 (All Rights Reserved)

Biblical Authority:

Biblical Authority Romans 15:1-11 (NIV) We who are strong ought to bear with the failings of the weak and not to please ourselves. 2  Each of us should please our neighbors for their good, to build them up. 3  For even Christ did not please himself but, as it is written: “The insults of those who insult you have fallen on me.” 4  For everything that was written in the past was written to teach us, so that through the endurance taught in the Scriptures and the encouragement they provide we might have hope. 5  May the God who gives endurance and encouragement give you the same attitude of mind toward each other that Christ Jesus had, 6  so that with one mind and one voice you may glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. 7  Accept one another, then, just as Christ accepted you, in order to bring praise to God. 8  For I tell you that Christ has become a servant of the Jews on behalf of God’s truth, so that the promises made to the patriarchs might be confirmed 9  and, moreover, that the Gentiles might glorify God for his mercy. As it is written: “Therefore I will praise you among the Gentiles; I will sing the praises of your name.” 10  Again, it says, “Rejoice, you Gentiles, with his people.” 11  And again, “Praise the Lord, all you Gentiles;     let all the peoples extol him.” 2

Introduction Workforce Development:

Introduction Workforce Development Workforce Development is an American economic development approach that attempts to enhance a region's economic stability and prosperity by focusing on people rather than businesses. It is essentially a human resources strategy. Work force development has evolved from a problem-focused approach, addressing issues such as low-skilled workers or the need for more employees in a particular industry, to a holistic approach considering participants' many barriers and the overall needs of the region. 3

Introduction Workforce Development:

Work force development has historically been found in two forms: Place-Based Strategies that attempt to address the needs of people living in a particular neighborhood, or Sector-Based Strategies that focus on matching workers' skills to needs in an industry already present in the region. Across both approaches, themes for best practices have emerged. Successful work force development programs typically have a strong network of ties in the community, and are equipped to respond to changes in their environments. Additionally, they take a holistic approach to the problems faced by participants. 4 Introduction Workforce Development

Introduction Workforce Development:

Traditional work force development has been problem-focused. Economic development practitioners evaluated neighborhoods, cities, or states on the basis of perceived weaknesses in human resource capacity. However, recent efforts view work force development in a more positive light. Economic developers use work force development as a way to increase equity among inhabitants of a region. Inner-city residents may not have access to equal education opportunities, and work force development programs can increase their skill level so they can compete with suburbanites for high-paying jobs. Work force development today often takes a more holistic approach, addressing issues such as spatial mismatch or poor transportation to jobs. Programs to train workers are often part of a network of other human service or community opportunities. 5 Introduction Workforce Development

Introduction Workforce Development:

Several potential barriers exist for employing sector-based work force development strategies. First , in many regions a skills gap exists between what workers know and what employers need. Although demand might be high for a particular occupation, it may be unrealistic to train a low-skill population in the necessary skills. Second , rapid change makes sector-based strategies difficult. Quick turnover in technology can make a training program obsolete in a few years. Last , many potential workers in the United States demonstrate low literacy or educational levels. In some regions, work force development programs will have to teach basic skills like reading as well as giving instruction in more specialized tasks. 6 Introduction Workforce Development

Internships:

Internships An internship is a job training for white-collar and professional careers. Internships for professional careers are similar in some ways to apprenticeships for trade and vocational jobs, but the lack of standardization and oversight leaves the term open to broad interpretation. Interns may be college or university students, high school students, or post-graduate adults. These positions may be paid or unpaid and are usually temporary. 7

Internships:

Internships Generally, an internship consists of an exchange of services for experience between the student and an organization. Students can also use an internship to determine if they have an interest in a particular career, create a network of contacts or gain school credit. Some interns find permanent, paid employment with the organizations for which they worked. 8

Internships:

Internships An internship may be paid, unpaid, or partially paid (in the form of a stipend). Stipends are typically a fixed amount of money that is paid out on a regular basis. Usually, interns that are paid through stipends are paid on a monthly basis. Paid internships are common in professional fields including medicine, architecture, science, engineering, law, business (especially accounting and finance), technology, and advertising. Non-profit charities and think tanks often have unpaid, volunteer positions. 9

Apprenticeships:

Apprenticeships Apprenticeship is a system of training a new generation of practitioners of a trade or profession with on-the-job training and often some accompanying study (classroom work and reading). Apprenticeships also enable practitioners to gain a license to practice in a regulated profession. Most of their training is done while working for an employer who helps the apprentices learn their trade or profession, in exchange for their continued labor for an agreed period after they have achieved measurable competencies. Apprenticeships typically last 3 to 6 years. 10

Apprenticeships:

11 People who successfully complete an apprenticeship reach the Journeyman level of competence. Although the formal boundaries and terminology of the apprentice/journeyman/master system often do not extend outside of guilds and trade unions, the concept of on-the-job training leading to competence over a period of years is found in any field of skilled labor. Apprenticeships

Apprenticeships:

12 The modern concept of an internship is similar to an apprenticeship. Universities still use apprenticeship schemes in their production of scholars: bachelors are promoted to masters and then produce a thesis under the oversight of a supervisor before the corporate body of the university recognizes the achievement of the standard of a doctorate. In “The Wealth of Nations”, Adam Smith states that: “Seven years seem anciently to have been, all over Europe, the usual term established for the duration of apprenticeships in the greater part of incorporated trades...” Apprenticeships

On-The-Job Training:

On-The-Job Training 13 On-The-Job Training ( OJT ) is a form of training taking place in a normal working situation. On-the-job training, sometimes called direct instruction, is one of the earliest forms of training (observational learning is probably the earliest). It is a one-on-one training located at the job site, where someone who knows how to do a task shows another how to perform it.

On-The-Job Training:

14 It may not be the most effective or the most efficient method at times, but it is normally the easiest to arrange and manage. Because the training takes place on the job, it can be highly realistic and no transfer of learning is required. It is often inexpensive because no special equipment is needed other than what is normally used on the job. On-The-Job Training

On-The-Job Training:

15 One drawback is that OJT takes the trainer and materials out of production for the duration of the training time. In addition, due to safety or other production factors, it is prohibitive in some environment. On-The-Job Training

The US Department of Labor:

The US Department of Labor 16 The United States Department of Labor ( DOL ) is a cabinet-level department of the U.S. federal government responsible for occupational safety, wage and hour standards, unemployment insurance benefits, reemployment services, and some economic statistics; many U.S. states also have such departments. The department is headed by the U.S. Secretary of Labor.

The US Department of Labor:

17 The purpose of the Department of Labor is to: foster, promote, and develop the welfare of the wage earners, job seekers, and retirees of the United States; improve working conditions; advance opportunities for profitable employment; and assure work-related benefits and rights. The US Department of Labor

The US Department of Labor:

18 In carrying out this mission, the Department of Labor administers and enforces more than 180 federal laws and thousands of federal regulations. These mandates and the regulations that implement them cover many workplace activities for about 10 million employers and 125 million workers. The US Department of Labor

The Jobs Training Partnership Act:

The Jobs Training Partnership Act 19 The Job Training Partnership Act of 1982 ( Pub.L . 97–300, 29 U.S.C. § 1501, et seq.) was a United States federal law passed October 13, 1982, by the United States Department of Labor during the Ronald Reagan administration. The law was the successor to the previous federal job training legislation, the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA). It was repealed by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 during the administration of President Bill Clinton.

The Jobs Training Partnership Act:

20 The law was enacted to establish federal assistance programs to prepare youth and unskilled adults for entry into the labor force and to provide job training to economically disadvantaged and other individuals facing serious barriers to employment. In order to carry out its purpose, the law authorized appropriations for fiscal year 1983 and for each succeeding fiscal year to carry out adult and youth programs, federally administered programs, summer youth employment and training programs, and employment and training assistance for dislocated workers. The Jobs Training Partnership Act

The Jobs Training Partnership Act:

21 The stated goal of the JTPA was to target an economically disadvantaged population for job training assistance. The funding allocation for the JTPA was determined using a formula outlined in Title II: One-Third of the funding was allotted based on the relative number of unemployed individuals living in areas of substantial unemployment, One-Third was based on the relative excess number of the unemployed, and One-Third was based on the relative number of economically disadvantaged individuals. The Jobs Training Partnership Act This act was repealed by title I, Sec. 199(b)(2) of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998. Some of the provisions were adjusted for the new act and some were dropped.

Opportunities Industrialization Centers of America:

Opportunities Industrialization Centers of America 22 In the 1960s, after leading protest campaigns to expose discriminatory hiring and open thousands of jobs to African Americans, the Reverend Leon Sullivan (1922-2001) founded the Opportunities Industrialization Center (OIC), a vocational, educational, and life skills training program designed to prepare young men and women for full-time employment.

Opportunities Industrialization Centers of America:

23 Moving beyond protest to address the barriers of poverty and oppression, the OIC quickly expanded into all corners of the city and ultimately grew into a national and international movement that trained millions of workers from all racial and ethnic backgrounds. The OIC first opened its doors on January 26, 1964, inside a refurbished jailhouse at Nineteenth and Oxford Streets. The building, emblematic of the area’s urban decay, became a potent symbol of hope in North Philadelphia. Opportunities Industrialization Centers of America

Opportunities Industrialization Centers of America:

24 The OIC’s skeleton-key logo promised “To Open Any Door” and proudly proclaimed Sullivan’s self-help motto, “Helping People Help Themselves.” Trainees started in the “Feeder Program,” which sought to eliminate the stigma of remedial education by confronting the candidates’ learned sense of racial inferiority. Students took courses in African American history to develop a deeper appreciation for their heritage and to cultivate a new sense of self-esteem, identity, and pride. Opportunities Industrialization Centers of America

Opportunities Industrialization Centers of America:

25 Building on this newly fortified base, students received supplemental instruction in communication skills, basic reading, writing, arithmetic, consumer education, interpersonal relationships, and personal hygiene. Candidates then progressed to the OIC Technical Skill Center for training in a wide variety of manufacturing jobs. Rev. Sullivan extolled the virtues of OIC trainees, negotiated with businesses to hire them, and cultivated additional financial and instructional support from corporate leaders. Opportunities Industrialization Centers of America

Opportunities Industrialization Centers of America:

26 OIC’s early years were challenging. Funding came from a patchwork series of donations from parishioners at Zion Baptist Church. At one point, Sullivan and his wife, Grace (1924-2011), took out a loan against their home to make payroll. Not long after, a massive infusion of federal and philanthropic funding helped stabilize and expand OIC beyond Philadelphia’s borders. In March 1964, a $200,000 grant from the Ford Foundation provided vital funding. In December, OIC received a $458,000 grant from the Department of Labor to administer job training and education programs. In the summer of 1965, OIC won the support of Lyndon Johnson (1908-73) and his War On Poverty and received a $1.7 million dollar grant from the Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO). Opportunities Industrialization Centers of America

Economic Empowerment:

Economic Empowerment 27 Economic Development is the sustained, concerted actions of policy makers and communities that promote the standard of living and economic health of a specific area. Economic development can also be referred to as the quantitative and qualitative changes in the economy. Such acts can involve multiple areas including development of human capital, critical infrastructure, regional competitiveness, social inclusion, health, safety, literacy, and other initiatives.

Economic Empowerment:

28 The scope of economic development includes the process and policies by which a nation improves the economic, political, and social well-being of its people. The University of Iowa's Center for International Finance and Development states that: 'Economic development' is a term that economists, politicians, and others have used frequently in the 20th century. The concept, however, has been in existence in the West for centuries. Modernization, Westernization, and especially Industrialization are other terms people have used while discussing economic development. Economic development has a direct relationship with the environment. Economic Empowerment

Economic Empowerment:

29 Economic development typically involves improvements in a variety of indicators such as literacy rates, life expectancy, and poverty rates. GDP does not take into account other aspects such as leisure time, environmental quality, freedom, or social justice; alternative measures of economic well-being have been proposed. Essentially, a country's economic development is related to its human development, which encompasses, among other things, health and education. Economic Empowerment

Service Learning:

Service Learning 30 Service-Learning is an educational approach that balances formal instruction and direction with the opportunity to serve in the community in order to provide a pragmatic, progressive learning experience. Service-Learning must properly connect the traditional classroom experience with the real life lessons that come through service. Proper S-L approaches will provide a series of exercises to allow students to reflect on their service experiences in order to grow in character, in problem-solving skills, and in an understanding of civic responsibility.

Service Learning:

31 Many colleges and universities now embrace the concept of Service-Learning as a legitimate and beneficial means to engage students in their learning experience. Although Service-Learning approaches may differ greatly from place to place, it should allow participants the opportunity to effectively learn through the practical experience of serving the community in one way or another. Service Learning

Service Learning:

32 The theology of service, that is what the Bible says about service, is central to a service-learning approach to education. The theology of service states that Christians have an ethical obligation to serve others. As a Christ follower, a Christian’s main responsibility is to mirror Christ by ministering to those around them. From this philosophy comes the educational method of service-learning. Service-learning gives the student the ability to directly apply what they are learning in a way that makes a difference. Service Learning

Mentorship:

Mentorship 33 Mentorship is a personal developmental relationship in which a more experienced or more knowledgeable person helps to guide a less experienced or less knowledgeable person. The mentor may be older or younger, but have a certain area of expertise. It is a learning and development partnership between someone with vast experience and someone who wants to learn.

Mentorship:

34 The person in receipt of mentorship may be referred to as a protégé (male), a protégée (female), an apprentice or, in recent years, a mentee . "Mentoring" is a process that always involves communication and is relationship based, but its precise definition is elusive. Mentorship

Mentorship:

35 Mentoring is a process for the informal transmission of knowledge, social capital, and the psychosocial support perceived by the recipient as relevant to work, career, or professional development. Mentoring entails informal communication, usually face-to-face and during a sustained period of time, between a person who is perceived to have greater relevant knowledge, wisdom, or experience (the mentor) and a person who is perceived to have less (the protégé)". Mentorship

Questions & Answers:

Questions & Answers 36

Thank You!:

Thank You! The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 1735 Market Street, Suite 3750 100 Edgewood Avenue, Suite 1690 Philadelphia, PA 19102 Atlanta, GA 30303 (878) 222-0100 Voice | Data | SMS www.TheAdvocacyFoundation.org © The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 2015 (All Rights Reserved) 37

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