Social Program Sustainability

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Social Program Sustainability

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Social Program Sustainability:

Social Program Sustainability The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 1735 Market Street, Suite 3750 100 Edgewood Avenue, Suite 1690 Philadelphia, PA 19102 Atlanta, GA 30303 (878) 222-0100 Voice | Data | SMS www.TheAdvocacyFoundation.org © The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 2015 (All Rights Reserved)

Biblical Authority:

Biblical Authority Luke 6:43-49 (NASB) For there is no good tree which produces bad fruit, nor, on the other hand, a bad tree which produces good fruit. 44  For each tree is known by its own fruit. For men do not gather figs from thorns, nor do they pick grapes from a briar bush. 45  The good man out of the good treasure of his heart brings forth what is good; and the evil man out of the evil treasure brings forth what is evil; for his mouth speaks from that which fills his heart. Builders and Foundations 46  “Why do you call Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ and do not do what I say? 47  Everyone who comes to Me and hears My words and acts on them, I will show you whom he is like: 48  he is like a man building a house, who dug deep and laid a foundation on the rock; and when a flood occurred, the torrent burst against that house and could not shake it, because it had been well built. 49  But the one who has heard and has not acted accordingly , is like a man who built a house on the ground without any foundation; and the torrent burst against it and immediately it collapsed, and the ruin of that house was great.” 2

Introduction:

Introduction 3 Nonprofits are typically organized into major functional areas, such as: central administration, governance, and programming. To be sustainable over the long term, each functional area must operate efficiently and effectively and take its place as part of the whole. The problem arises when cutbacks, programmatic shifts, changing funder and donor needs and the like, take the stage. In such cases, resource-strapped nonprofits are stretched too thin. As a result, less essential functions may become neglected and begin to weaken. This, in turn, affects the organization’s ability to fulfill its mission.

Introduction:

Introduction Sustainable nonprofits follow these core principles: Financial Sustainability Effective Management of Hybrid Revenue Strategies Development of An Explicit Nonprofit Business Model Continuous Decision-Making 4

Introduction:

Introduction 5 Board members connect the community with an organization’s mission, vision and values. As stewards, they educate the community about the organization’s work and they support the organization with resources needed to fulfill its mission. They hold the organization accountable, and provide fiscal oversight.

Introduction:

Introduction 6 Financial Management Nonprofits need to build the financial capacity necessary to maintain organizational stability. And financial viability is key. A stable nonprofit is able to adapt to changing environments and more effectively serve the community. To learn about building financial capacity, read Finance. Fundraising Though nonprofits and their boards often understand the impact of fundraising in maintaining a strong, sustainable organization, they may think that bringing more dollars in the door is the single answer to their problems. As a result, they underemphasize the need to integrate fundraising with marketing and communications, board governance, evaluation, HR and financial management.

Introduction:

Introduction 7 Five Ways to Increase Nonprofit Sustainability The Importance of Strategic Clarity and The Steps Your Organization Should Take to Focus On Priorities Diversifying Government Support Streams and How To Manage A Strapped Funding Environment Improving Productivity, Efficiency and Effectiveness Measuring Outcomes and Utilizing Reports to Drive Internal Learning Moving Beyond “ Vendorism ” and Viewing Government Decision Makers As Customers

Nonprofit Organizations:

Nonprofit Organizations 8 The nonprofit landscape is highly varied, although many people have come to associate NPOs with charitable organizations. Although charities do comprise an often high profile or visible aspect of the sector, there are many other types of nonprofits. Overall, they tend to be either member-serving or community-serving.

Nonprofit Organizations:

Nonprofit Organizations 9 Member-serving organizations include mutual societies, cooperatives, trade unions, credit unions, industry associations, sports clubs, retired serviceman's clubs and peak bodies – organizations that benefit a particular group of people – the members of the organization.

Nonprofit Organizations:

Nonprofit Organizations 10 Community-serving organizations are focused on providing services to the community in general, either globally or locally: organizations delivering human services programs or projects, aid and development programs, medical research, education and health services, and so on. Designation as a nonprofit does not mean that the organization does not intend to make a profit, but rather that the organization has no 'owners' and that the funds realized in the operation of the organization will not be used to benefit any owners.

Organizational Stability:

Organizational Stability 11 A simple model describes three stages of organizational growth and development—from Chaos; to Stability; to High Performance. There are also some key initiatives that leaders can take to move beyond chaos and eventually to high performance.

Organizational Stability:

Organizational Stability 12 Stage I: Chaos (Fire-Fighting Mentality) Crisis/short-term focus Lack of clear direction and goals Shifting priorities Unclear policies and procedures “Us” vs. “them” attitude Blame and lack of ownership Alienated work force

Organizational Stability:

Organizational Stability 13 Stage II: Stability (Back to the Basics) • Clarity of goals and direction • Consistency in priorities • Well-defined policies and procedures (technical and personnel) • Agreement on roles and responsibilities • Basic management processes rewarded and practiced (goal-setting, performance reviews, etc.)

Organizational Stability:

Organizational Stability 14 Stage III: High Performance (Outstanding, Sustainable Results) • Clear statement of mission that creates sense of esprit de corp. • Well defined values which result in distinctive culture • Respect for people that is a deeply ingrained part of culture • Good communication and information sharing systems • High involvement and empowerment of people • Design (work flow, structure, systems) that supports mission and values

Nonprofit Financial Stability:

Nonprofit Financial Stability 15 Sometimes, it seems like community work has a high price tag, and no one wants to foot the bill. There is so much change we want to see happen, but our finances are in such a sorry state that we're just trying to maintain what we've done so far. Staff is underpaid, overworked, and burning out; necessary programs are dropped or scaled back because there's no money; and closing the organization's doors is a constant fear in the back of everyone's mind. This goes on for years for many nonprofit groups; for others, the doors really do slam shut.

Nonprofit Financial Stability:

Nonprofit Financial Stability 16 By Developing Such A Plan, Your Finances Should Become More Secure, Which Means: Following Guidelines An Increased Focus On Your Real Work Becoming More Competitive In Your Field Easier Transitions

Nonprofit Financial Stability:

Nonprofit Financial Stability 17 Every organization is unique, and each will have its own way of doing things. Planning for financial sustainability is certainly no different. For most groups, however, a process like the following can be very helpful. Modify it to fit your own needs: Decide Who Will Develop The Plan Let Everyone Know What You Are Doing Conduct An Internal Audit Determine How Much Money You Need

Nonprofit Financial Stability:

Nonprofit Financial Stability 18 Make A List Of What Your Group Is Doing Now That Is: Essential to your mission Something that your organization should be doing What Each of These Things Costs Set Objectives

Nonprofit Financial Stability:

Nonprofit Financial Stability 19 What Are Different Ways To Obtain Resources That Make Sense To Your Organization? Leveraging shared positions and resources Becoming a line item in an existing budget Incorporating activities and services in organizations with a similar mission Applying for grants Using existing personnel resources Soliciting in-kind support Fundraisers Using third-party funding Developing a fee-for-service structure Acquiring tax revenues Securing endowments and giving arrangements Establishing membership fees and dues Developing a business plan Creating a for-profit corporation to help pay for the nonprofit side Have programs be "picked up" by other organizations

Fundraising:

Fundraising 20 Traditionally, fundraising consisted mostly of asking for donations on the street or at people's doors, and this is experiencing very strong growth in the form of face-to-face fundraising, but new forms of fundraising such as online fundraising have emerged in recent years, though these are often based on older methods such as grassroots fundraising. Some examples of charitable organizations include student scholarship merit awards for athletic or academic achievement, humanitarian concerns, disaster relief, human rights, research, and other social issues.

Fundraising:

Fundraising 21 Many non-profit organizations take advantage of the services of professional fundraisers. These fundraisers may be paid for their services either through fees unrelated to the amounts of money to be raised, or by retaining a percentage of raised funds (percentage-based compensation). The latter approach is expressly forbidden under the Code of Ethics of the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP), a professional membership body. However, by far the most common practice of American non-profits is to employ a staff person whose main responsibility is fund raising.

Fundraising:

Fundraising 22 Popular charity fundraisers in major American cities include lavish Black-Tie Gala benefit dinners that honor celebrities, philanthropists, and business leaders who help to fundraise for the event's goals through solicitations of their social and business connections. Another specific type of event is the " Ad Book " fundraiser, where those who wish to give funds to a fundraising group do so through the sponsorship or statement within a book of advertisements. Online Fundraising pages have become very popular for people taking part in activities such as marathon running. Those pages facilitate online payments in support of the charity event.

Fundraising:

Fundraising 23 A Capital Campaign is "an intensive fundraising effort designed to raise a specified sum of money within a defined time period to meet the varied asset-building needs of an organization." Asset-building activities include the construction, renovation or expansion of facilities (for example, a new building), the acquisition or improvement of land, equipment, or other items, and additions to a financial endowment. Two characteristics set capital campaigns apart from other forms of fund-raising activities. First, "the gifts solicited are much larger than those generally sought during an annual fund." Second, "pledges are emphasized as commitments payable over a number of years convenient to the donor or through the transfer of appreciated real or personal property."

CrowdFunding:

CrowdFunding 24 Crowdfunding is the practice of funding a project or venture by raising monetary contributions from a large number of people, typically via the internet. Crowdfunding is a form of alternative finance, which has emerged outside of the traditional financial system. The crowdfunding model is fueled by three types of actors: The project initiator who proposes the idea and/or project to be funded; individuals or groups who support the idea; and a moderating organization (the "platform") that brings the parties together to launch the idea. In 2013, the crowdfunding industry grew to be over $5.1 billion worldwide.

CrowdFunding:

CrowdFunding 25 Crowdfunding as a concept pre-dates the internet and projects like the Statue of Liberty raised funds from a large number of donors. Crowdfunding websites helped companies and individuals worldwide raise US$89 million from members of the public in 2010, US$1.47 billion in 2011 and US$2.66 billion in 2012—US$1.6 billion of the 2012 amount was raised in North America. In 2012 more than one million individual campaigns were established globally and the industry was projected to grow to US$5.1 billion in 2013.

CrowdFunding:

CrowdFunding 26 Charity crowdfunding is the collective effort of individuals to help charitable causes. The inputs of the individuals in the crowd trigger the crowdfunding process and influence the ultimate value of the offerings or outcomes of the process. Each individual acts as an agent of the offering, selecting and promoting the projects in which they believe. They will sometimes play a donor role oriented towards providing help on social projects.

CrowdFunding:

CrowdFunding 27 An individual who takes part in crowdfunding initiatives tends to reveal several distinct traits: Innovative Orientation : which stimulates the desire to try new modes of interacting with firms and other consumers; or Social Identification : with the content, cause or project selected for funding, which sparks the desire to be a part of the initiative; or Monetary Exploitation : which motivates the individual to participate by expecting a payoff.

Performance Management:

Performance Management 28 Performance Management is also known as a process by which organizations align their resources, systems and employees to strategic objectives and priorities. This is used most often in the workplace, can apply wherever people interact — schools, churches, community meetings, sports teams, health setting, governmental agencies, social events, and even political settings - anywhere in the world people interact with their environments to produce desired effects. Armstrong and Baron (1998) defined it as a “strategic and integrated approach to increase the effectiveness of [organizations] by improving the performance of the people who work in them and by developing the capabilities of teams and individual contributors.”

Performance Management:

Performance Management 29 It may be possible to get all employees to reconcile personal goals with organizational goals and increase productivity and profitability of an organization using this process. It can be applied by organizations or a single department or section inside an organization, as well as an individual person. The performance process is appropriately named the self-propelled performance process (SPPP). First, a commitment analysis must be done where a job mission statement is drawn up for each job. Following the commitment analysis is the work analysis of a particular job in terms of the reporting structure and job description. If a job description is not available, then a systems analysis can be done to draw up a job description. The aim with this analysis is to determine the continuous critical objectives and performance standards for each job.

Performance Management:

Performance Management 30 Managing employee or system performance and aligning their objectives facilitates the effective delivery of strategic and operational goals. In the public sector, the effects of performance management systems have differed from positive to negative, suggesting that differences in the characteristics of performance management systems and the contexts into which they are implemented play an important role to the success or failure of performance management.

Performance Management:

Performance Management 31 Benefits may include: Grow in Productivity Reduce Operational Costs Aligns the organization with Specific Goals & Objectives Decreases the time it takes to create strategic or operational changes Motivated workforce Optimizes incentive plans to specific goals for over achievement Improves staff & stakeholder engagement since everyone understands how they are directly contributing to organizational goals Create transparency in achievement of goals Professional development programs better aligned directly to achieving Organizational goals Improved management control Flexibility and responsiveness to management needs Helps audit / comply with legislative requirements and Compliance Simplifies communication of strategic goals scenario planning Provides well documented and communicated process documentation

Stakeholder Management:

Stakeholder Management 32 A stakeholder is any individual, group or organization that can affect, be affected by, or perceive itself to be affected by a program. Effective Stakeholder Management creates positive relationships with stakeholders through the appropriate management of their expectations and agreed objectives. Stakeholder management is a process and control that must be planned and guided by underlying principles.

Stakeholder Management:

Stakeholder Management 33 The first step in your stakeholder analysis is to brainstorm who your stakeholders are: As part of this, think of all the people who are affected by your work, who have influence or power over it, or have an interest in its successful or unsuccessful conclusion. Remember that although stakeholders may be both organizations and people, ultimately you must communicate with people. Make sure that you identify the correct individual stakeholders within a stakeholder organization.

Stakeholder Management:

Stakeholder Management 34 In a nutshell, the stakeholder management comprises four steps, which are below: Identify, recognize and acknowledge stakeholder; Determine their influence and interest; Establish communication management plan Influencing and engaging stakeholder

Stakeholder Management:

Stakeholder Management 35 Map out your stakeholders on a Power/Interest Grid as shown by the image, and classify them by their power over your work and by their interest in your work. High Power, Interested People : these are the people you must fully engage and make the greatest efforts to satisfy. High Power, Less Interested People : put enough work in with these people to keep them satisfied, but not so much that they become bored with your message. Low Power, Interested People : keep these people adequately informed, and talk to them to ensure that no major issues are arising. These people can often be very helpful with the detail of your project. Low Power, Less Interested People : again, monitor these people, but do not bore them with excessive communication.

From Good to Great:

From Good to Great 36 In the nonprofit world, where funding is typically mission-driven, innovation often lags behind the need to pursue everyday programming activities. But that’s not to say it’s not out there. Organizations all across the country are innovating to create more impact. In fact, research shows many of these nonprofits utilize similar practices to help them go from good to great.

From Good to Great:

From Good to Great 37 Leslie Crutchfield and Heather McLeod Grant published a two-year study of high-impact nonprofits and uncovered six innovative practices that any organization can use to address organizational challenges, build capacity, effectively fulfill their mission and create more impact in the communities they serve: Share Leadership Advocate And Serve Make Markets Work Inspire Evangelists Nurture Nonprofit Networks Master The Art Of Adaptation

Questions & Answers:

Questions & Answers 38

Thank You!:

Thank You! The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 1735 Market Street, Suite 3750 100 Edgewood Avenue, Suite 1690 Philadelphia, PA 19102 Atlanta, GA 30303 (878) 222-0100 Voice | Data | SMS www.TheAdvocacyFoundation.org © The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 2015 (All Rights Reserved) 39

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