Solutions for Homelessness

Views:
 
Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

Solutions for Homelessness

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Solutions for Homelessness:

Solutions for Homelessness The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 1735 Market Street, Suite 3750 100 Edgewood Avenue, Suite 1690 Philadelphia, PA 19102 Atlanta, GA 30303 (878) 222-0100 Voice | Data | SMS www.TheAdvocacyFoundation.org © The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 2015 (All Rights Reserved)

Biblical Authority:

Biblical Authority Isaiah 58:6-8 (KJV) 6  Is not this the fast that I have chosen? to loose the bands of wickedness, to undo the heavy burdens, and to let the oppressed go free, and that ye break every yoke? 7  Is it not to deal thy bread to the hungry, and that thou bring the poor that are cast out to thy house? when thou seest the naked, that thou cover him; and that thou hide not thyself from thine own flesh? 8  Then shall thy light break forth as the morning, and thine health shall spring forth speedily: and thy righteousness shall go before thee; the glory of the Lord shall be thy reward. 2

Introduction:

Introduction 3 Homelessness is the condition of people without a regular dwelling. People who are homeless are most often unable to acquire and maintain regular, safe, secure and adequate housing, or lack "fixed, regular, and adequate night-time residence."

Introduction:

Introduction 4 The legal definition of homeless varies from country to country, or among different jurisdictions in the same country or region. The term homeless may also include people whose primary night-time residence is in a homeless shelter, a warming center, a domestic violence shelter, a vehicle (including recreational vehicles and campers), squatting, cardboard boxes, a tent, tarpaulins, or other ad hoc housing situations.

introduction:

introduction 5 An estimated 100 million people worldwide were homeless in 2005. In western countries, the large majority of homeless are men (75–80%), with single males particularly overrepresented. Most countries provide a variety of services to assist homeless people. They often provide food, shelter and clothing and may be organized and run by community organizations (often with the help of volunteers) or by government departments.

introduction:

introduction 6 Many cities also have street newspapers, which are publications designed to provide employment opportunity to homeless people. While some homeless have jobs, some must seek other methods to make a living. Begging or panhandling is one option, but is becoming increasingly illegal in many cities.

Homelessness in the united states:

Homelessness in the united states 7 The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in January 2012 annual point-in-time count found that 633,782 people across America were homeless. With 2007 as a benchmark, the data from the report showed: a 6.8 percent decline in homelessness among individuals, a 3.7 percent decline of homeless families, a 13.1 percent decline of the unsheltered homeless population, and a 19.3 percent decline in persons experiencing chronic homelessness.

Homelessness in the united states:

8 One out of 50 children or 1.5 million children in America will be homeless each year. In 2013 that number jumped to one out of 30 children, or 2.5 million. Homelessness in the united states

Homelessness in the united states:

9 There were an estimated 57,849 homeless veterans estimated in the United States during January 2013; or 12 percent of all homeless adults. Just under 8 percent of homeless U.S. veterans are female. Homelessness in the united states

Homelessness in the united states:

10 Texas, California and Florida have the highest numbers of unaccompanied homeless youth under the age of 18; comprising 58% of the total homeless under 18 youth population Homelessness in the united states

Homelessness in the united states:

11 According to the United States Conference of Mayors, in 2008 the three most commonly cited causes of homelessness for persons and families were a lack of affordable housing (cited by 72 percent) poverty (52%), and unemployment (44%). The suggestions to alleviate homelessness included providing more housing for persons with disabilities (72%), creating more employment opportunities (68%), and building more assisted housing units (64%). Homelessness in the united states

Anti-homelessness legislation:

Anti-homelessness legislation 12 Since the publication of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Charter of the United Nations — UN) in 1948, the public perception has been increasingly changing to a focus on the human right to housing, travel and migration as a part of individual self-determination rather than the human condition. Anti-Homelessness Legislation can take two forms; legislation that aims to help and re-house homeless people, and legislation that is intended to send the homeless to homeless shelters compulsively, or criminalize homelessness and begging.

Anti-homelessness legislation:

13 The Declaration, an international law reinforcement of the Nuremberg Trial Judgements , upholds the rights of one nation to intervene in the affairs of another if said nation is abusing its citizens, and rose out of a 1939–1945 World War II Atlantic environment of extreme split between "haves" and "have nots ." Article 6 of the 1998 Declaration of Human Duties and Responsibilities declares that members of the global community have individual and collective duties and responsibilities to take appropriate action to prevent the commission of gross or systematic human rights abuses. Anti-homelessness legislation

Anti-homelessness legislation:

14 Laws supporting homeless people generally place obligations on the state to support or house homeless people. The charter of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act of 1986 (Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act) is to "coordinate the Federal response to homelessness and to create partnerships between the Federal agencies addressing homelessness and every level of government and every element of the private sector". Anti-homelessness legislation

Anti-homelessness legislation:

15 Use of the law that criminalizes the homeless generally takes on one of five forms: Restricting the public areas in which sitting or sleeping are allowed. Removing the homeless from particular areas. Prohibiting begging. Selective enforcement of laws. Selective creation of laws. Anti-homelessness legislation

Anti-homelessness legislation:

16 The National Coalition for the Homeless reports that there is a growing trend in the United States towards criminalizing the state of being homeless. Proponents of this approach believe that punitive measures will deter people from choosing to be homeless. To this end, cities across the country increasingly outlaw activities such as sleeping, eating, sitting, and begging in public spaces, and selectively enforce more neutral laws—such as those prohibiting open containers or loitering—against homeless populations. Violators of such laws typically incur criminal penalties, which result in fines and/or incarceration. Anti-homelessness legislation

The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act:

The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act 17 The McKinney–Vento Homeless Assistance Act of 1987 (Pub. L. 100-77, July 22, 1987, 101 Stat. 482, 42 U.S.C. § 11301 et seq. ) is a United States federal law that provides federal money for homeless shelter programs. It was the first significant federal legislative response to homelessness, and was passed and signed into law by President Ronald Reagan on July 22, 1987. The act has been reauthorized several times over the years.

The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act:

18 The McKinney Act originally had fifteen programs providing a spectrum of services to homeless people, including the Continuum of Care Programs: the Supportive Housing Program, the Shelter Plus Care Program, and the Single Room Occupancy Program, as well as the Emergency Shelter Grant Program. It established the Interagency Council on the Homeless (later called the Interagency Council on Homelessness). The legislation has been amended several times since it was first written and enacted. The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act

The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act:

19 The original federal Act, known as simply as the McKinney Act, provided little protection for homeless children in the area of public education. As a result, the State of Illinois passed the Illinois Education for Homeless Children Act, which was drafted by Joseph Clary, an attorney and advocate for the Illinois Coalition to End Homelessness. Clary then worked with national advocates to ensure that the protections afforded to homeless children by the Illinois statute were incorporated into the McKinney Act. At that point, the McKinney Act was amended to become the McKinney-Vento Act. That Act uses the Illinois statute in defining homeless children as “individuals who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence.” The Act then goes on to give examples of children who would fall under this definition. The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act

The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act:

20 The McKinney-Vento Act is a conditional funding act which means that the federal government gives grants to states and, in return, the grantee states are bound by the terms of the act. If a state chooses not to accept federal funds for these purposes, it does not have to implement the act. While some states are amply complying with the Act, others are falling short. The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act

Housing first programs:

Housing first programs 21 Rather than moving homeless individuals through different "levels" of housing, whereby each level moves them closer to "independent housing" (for example: from the streets to a public shelter, and from a public shelter to a transitional housing program, and from there to their own apartment in the community); Housing First moves the homeless individual or household immediately from the streets or homeless shelters into their own apartments.

Housing first programs:

22 Housing First approaches are based on the concept that a homeless individual or household's first and primary need is to obtain stable housing, and that other issues that may affect the household can and should be addressed once housing is obtained. In contrast, many other programs operate from a model of "housing readiness" — that is, that an individual or household must address other issues that may have led to the episode of homelessness prior to entering housing. Housing first programs

Housing first programs:

23 Principles of Housing First are: 1) Move people into housing directly from streets and shelters without preconditions of treatment acceptance or compliance; 2) The provider is obligated to bring robust support services to the housing. These services are predicated on assertive engagement, not coercion; 3) Continued tenancy is not dependent on participation in services; 4) Units targeted to most disabled and vulnerable homeless members of the community; 5) Embraces harm-reduction approach to addictions rather than mandating abstinence. At the same time, the provider must be prepared to support resident commitment to recovery; 6) Residents must have leases and tenant protections under the law; 7) Can be implemented as either a project-based or scattered site model. Housing first programs

Housing first programs:

24 Housing First programs currently operate throughout the United States in cities such as New Orleans, Louisiana; Plattsburgh, New York; Anchorage, Alaska; Minneapolis, Minnesota; New York City; District of Columbia; Denver, Colorado; San Francisco, California; Atlanta, Georgia; Chicago, Illinois; Quincy, Massachusetts; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Salt Lake City, Utah; Seattle, Washington;Los Angeles and Cleveland, Ohio among many others, and are intended to be crucial aspects of communities' so-called 10-Year Plans To End Chronic Homelessness also advocated by USICH. Housing First is currently endorsed by the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH) as a "best practice" for governments and service-agencies to use in their fight to end chronic homelessness in America. Housing first programs

Housing first programs:

25 In September 2010, it was reported that the Housing First Initiative had significantly reduced the chronic homeless single person population in Boston, Massachusetts , although homeless families were still increasing in number. Some shelters were reducing the number of beds due to lowered numbers of homeless, and some emergency shelter facilities were closing, especially the emergency Boston Night Center. Housing first programs

Rapid re-housing programs:

26 Similar to Housing First, Rapid Re-Housing is concerned with helping persons who are homeless move quickly into housing, thus minimizing the time they spend being homeless. Traditional homeless services have typically required homeless persons to move into transitional housing, wherein they participate in a program designed to make them "ready for housing" (such as participate in a 12 step program). Once they have completed the transitional housing program, they are assisted in moving into permanent housing. In some jurisdictions, these programs take place in homeless shelters, not transitional housing. Rapid Re-Housing is based on evidence that indicates that individuals and families have better outcomes if they spend more time in permanent housing. Thus, Rapid Re-Housing concentrates on assisting homeless persons move into permanent housing before any programs are delivered. Rapid re-housing programs

Rapid re-housing programs:

Rapid re-housing programs 27 Rapid Re-Housing is a relatively recent innovation in social policy that is an intervention designed to help those who are homeless. While Housing First uses many of the same philosophies as Rapid Re-Housing, the main distinction is that Housing First is geared towards chronically homeless persons with high needs (severe acuity), whereas Rapid Re-Housing is geared towards episodically homeless persons with moderate needs (moderate acuity).

Rapid re-housing programs:

28 Rapid Re-Housing is a similar program as Housing First but has several important distinctions. It is sometimes erroneously referred to as "Housing First Lite ." Main differences include: Rapid Re-Housing is always time-limited (usually 3–6 months of supports), whereas Housing First is usually longer (12–18 months) and can be indefinite Rapid Re-Housing is for persons with mid-range acuity, whereas Housing First is for those with high acuity Rapid Re-Housing is always delivered through scattered site apartments, whereas Housing First can be delivered through scattered site apartments or congregate living Housing First is delivered through Assertive community treatment or Intensive Case Management, whereas Rapid Re-Housing uses neither approach Rapid re-housing programs

Supportive housing programs:

Supportive housing programs 29 Supportive Housing is a combination of housing and services intended as a cost-effective way to help people live more stable, productive lives, and is an active "community services and funding" stream in New York and the US in 2013. Supportive housing is widely believed to work well for those who face the most complex challenges—individuals and families confronted with homelessness and who also have very low incomes and/or serious, persistent issues that may include addiction or alcoholism, mental health, HIV/AIDS, diverse disabilities (e.g., intellectual disabilities, mobility or sensory impairments) or other serious challenges to a successful life.

Supportive housing programs:

30 Supportive housing can be coupled with such social services as job training, life skills training, alcohol and drug abuse programs, community support services (e.g., child care, educational programs, coffee claches ), and case management to populations in need of assistance. Supportive housing is intended to be a pragmatic solution that helps people have better lives while reducing, to the extent feasible, the overall cost of care. As community housing, supportive housing can be developed as mixed income, scattered site housing not only through the traditional route of low income and building complexes. Supportive housing programs

Supportive housing programs:

31 Supported housing in the field of mental health is considered to be a critical component of a community support system which may involve supported education, supported or transitional employment, case management services, clubhouses, supported recreation and involvement of family and friends often translated into psychoeducational programs. Supportive housing programs

Supportive housing programs:

32 As a widely supported means to address homelessness (i.e., lack of a place to live or adequate housing), supportive housing seeks to address two key problems: Without housing, there is at best a highly problematic basis from which to mitigate the factors which lead to homelessness (e.g., lack of adequate income) and expensive problems which burden social service systems. Without supportive services, the tenant is likely to regress (have a difficult time) for the reasons that are presumed by service providers and government to lead to their loss of housing in the first place. Supportive housing programs

Homelessness among veterans:

Homelessness among veterans 33 Homeless Veterans are men and women who have served in the armed forces living without access to secure and appropriate accommodation. Many of these veterans suffer from post traumatic stress disorder, an anxiety disorder that often occurs after extreme emotional trauma involving threat or injury. Causes of homelessness include: Disabilities - physical injury or mental illness Substance abuse - drug abuse or alcoholism Family breakdown Joblessness and poverty Lack of low cost housing Government policy

Homelessness among veterans:

34 Estimates of the homeless population vary as these statistics are very difficult to obtain. The overall count in 2012 showed 62,619 homeless veterans in the United States of America. In January 2013, there were an estimated homeless veterans in the U.S., or 12% of the homeless population. Just under 8% are female. Homelessness among veterans

Homelessness among veterans:

35 Many programs and resources have been implemented across the United States in an effort to help homeless veterans. Among the prominent are: National Coalition for Homeless Veterans United States Department of Veteran Affairs United States Department of Housing and Urban Development The American Legion National Association of State Directors of Veterans Affairs Homelessness among veterans

Homelessness among veterans:

36 On November 3, 2009, United States Secretary Eric K. Shinseki spoke at the National Summit on Homeless Veterans and announced his plan. Along with President Obama, Shinseki outlined a comprehensive five-year plan to strengthen the Department of Veterans Affairs and its efforts. The plan focused on prevention of homelessness along with help for those living on the streets. The plan would expand mental health care and housing options for veterans, and would collaborate with: The Departments of Education, Labor, Health and Human Services, and Housing and Urban Development The Small Business Administration The U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness State directors of Veterans affairs Veteran Service Organizations National, state, and local social service providers and community groups Homelessness among veterans

Homelessness among veterans:

37 Shinseki emphasized the importance and impact of local initiatives and urged those present to lend a hand in this ongoing effort. He highlighted the need for improvements in: Education Jobs Healthcare Housing In 2009, call centers were established in order to assist homeless veterans to gain assistance. As of December 2014, of the 79.5 thousand veterans who contacted the call center, 27% were unable to speak to a counselor, and 47% of referrals lead to no support services provided to the homeless veteran. In a study published in the American Journal of Addiction, it found that there was indeed a link between both trauma of mental disorders that came upon the veterans studied and the substance abuse they partook in. Homelessness among veterans

Ten strategies to end veteran homelessness:

Ten strategies to end veteran homelessness 38 USICH (The United States Interagency Council on Homelessness ) has identified 10 strategies that increase leadership, collaboration, and coordination among programs serving Veterans experiencing homelessness, and promote rapid access to permanent housing for all Veterans. Each strategy is accompanied by additional resources to help community leaders and stakeholders understand how to implement these strategies more effectively. 1) Start at the Top: Recruit Your Mayor to Join the Mayors Challenge to End Veteran Homelessness . Mayors and local leaders are essential to securing and aligning the resources and partners necessary to end Veteran homelessness in every community. 2) Identify All Veterans Experiencing Homelessness by Name By identifying Veterans by name, a community is able to ensure that they are effectively and efficiently serving all Veterans needing housing and homelessness assistance. 

Ten strategies to end veteran homelessness:

39 3) Implement a Housing First System Orientation and Response By using a Housing First approach, a community can ensure that Veterans experiencing homelessness can move into permanent housing, with the right level of services, as quickly as possible. 4) Set and Meet Ambitious Short-Term Housing Placement Goals By setting concrete and ambitious short-term housing placement goals, your community can achieve bold outcomes around targeting Veterans experiencing homelessness and expediting entry to permanent housing. Ten strategies to end veteran homelessness

Ten strategies to end veteran homelessness:

40 5) Conduct Coordinated Outreach and Engagement Efforts Communities experience the greatest successes in providing permanent housing to Veterans not by merely waiting for Veterans to show up for help, but by proactively seeking out Veterans in need of assistance, sharing information across outreach teams and sites, using a Housing First approach to focus on permanent housing connections, and collaborating with other systems, including law enforcement, prisons and jails, hospitals, libraries, and job centers.  6) Implement Coordinated Entry Systems In order to use the resources that are ending and preventing Veteran homelessness effectively, individual programs and resources need to work together as part of a coordinated entry system that matches individuals and households experiencing homelessness to appropriate housing and services, based on a common and shared assessment process performed consistently across partners. Ten strategies to end veteran homelessness

Ten strategies to end veteran homelessness:

41 7) Deploy HUD-VASH/SSVF Effectively Achieving the goal requires the efficient deployment and full utilization of targeted programs like HUD-VASH and SSVF. Continuums of Care can partner with VA Medical Centers, HUD-VASH and SSVF providers to ensure participation in the community’s coordinated entry system, disseminate best practices, and remove barriers throughout the system so that when challenges related to the deployment of resources and performance of these programs do arise, strategies can be adjusted to increase the number of Veterans accessing permanent housing. 8) Improve Transitional Housing Performance and Consider Converting or Reallocating Resources into Permanent Supportive Housing     Communities can reach the goal of ending and preventing Veteran homelessness faster by seeking to help Veterans currently residing in transitional housing move into permanent housing as quickly as possible. Ten strategies to end veteran homelessness

Ten strategies to end veteran homelessness:

42 9) Increasing Connections to Employment As President Obama said in the 2015 State of the Union address, “If you want somebody who’s going to get the job done, hire a Veteran.” Communities should work with employers to commit to hiring Veterans, including Veterans who have experienced homelessness. 10) Coordinate with Legal Services Organizations to Solve Legal Needs One of the major reasons Veterans experience homelessness is due to unmet legal needs. Civil legal services attorneys are essential partners in removing barriers to housing and employment by solving civil legal problems such as preventing avoidable evictions, navigating outstanding warrants, expunging criminal records, and securing targeted and mainstream benefits. Ten strategies to end veteran homelessness

Ten strategies to end veteran homelessness:

43 Legal Services attorneys should also engage in systemic advocacy (to the degree allowable by law) to promote Housing First practices among public housing authorities and housing assistance programs. Your community should ensure that homeless assistance programs coordinate with legal services organization to address individual and systemic legal needs. Ten strategies to end veteran homelessness

Questions & Answers:

44 Questions & Answers 44

Thank You!:

Thank You! The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 1735 Market Street, Suite 3750 100 Edgewood Avenue, Suite 1690 Philadelphia, PA 19102 Atlanta, GA 30303 (878) 222-0100 Voice | Data | SMS www.TheAdvocacyFoundation.org © The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 2015 (All Rights Reserved) 45

authorStream Live Help