Culturally Relevant Programming - Social Equity Planning

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Culturally Relevant Programming - Social Equity Planning

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Culturally Relevant Programming Social Equity Planning:

Culturally Relevant Programming Social Equity Planning The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 1735 Market Street, Suite 3750 100 Edgewood Avenue, Suite 1690 Philadelphia, PA 19102 Atlanta, GA 30303 (878) 222-0100 Voice | Data | SMS www.TheAdvocacyFoundation.org © The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 2015 (All Rights Reserved)

Biblical Authority:

Biblical Authority Galatians 3:28 (NIV) 28  There is neither Jew nor Gentile, neither slave nor free, nor is there male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus. Colossians 3:11 (NIV) 11  Here there is no Gentile or Jew, circumcised or uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave or free, but Christ is all, and is in all. Revelation 7:9-10 (NIV) The Great Multitude in White Robes 9  After this I looked, and there before me was a great multitude that no one could count, from every nation, tribe, people and language, standing before the throne and before the Lamb. They were wearing white robes and were holding palm branches in their hands. 10  And they cried out in a loud voice: “Salvation belongs to our God, who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb.” Romans 14:10 (NIV) 10  You, then, why do you judge your brother or sister? Or why do you treat them with contempt? For we will all stand before God’s judgment seat. Ezekiel 47:22 (NIV) 22  You are to allot it as an inheritance for yourselves and for the foreigners residing among you and who have children. You are to consider them as native-born Israelites; along with you they are to be allotted an inheritance among the tribes of Israel. Proverbs 22:2 (NIV) 2  Rich and poor have this in common:     The Lord is the Maker of them all. 2

Introduction:

Introduction Wealth and income inequities within the United States, and between the United States and other nations, continue to increase rapidly. The average income disparity between a line worker and CEO in a large corporation is now more than four hundred to one. Social equity implies fair access to livelihood, education, and resources; full participation in the political and cultural life of the community; and self-determination in meeting fundamental needs. 3

Introduction:

Introduction As Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. observed: “Where there is injustice for one, there is injustice for all." Social equity is the cornerstone of society, which cannot be maintained for a few at the expense of the many. Increased equity results in decreased spending on prisons, security enforcement, welfare, and social services. It also creates new potential markets. 4

Introduction:

Introduction Inequities magnify the challenge of creating reliable prosperity in several ways. Those who are marginalized may be tempted to eat into reserves of nature and society to meet immediate needs, while those with abundant choices may seek conspicuous forms of consumption which — unintentionally — have the same depleting effect. Current toxic production activities are extremely unjust, with increased health impacts along racial and class lines. 5

Introduction:

Introduction Social equity is promoted by human-scale neighborhoods that provide shelter for all. Neighborhoods that offer a range of housing options, a mix of uses, and access to a variety of jobs, are often intergenerational and diverse. Such neighborhoods are encouraged by regional tax revenue sharing, which promotes an equitable distribution of tax revenues between the core city, inner suburbs, and rapidly developing outer suburbs. This prevents disinvestment in neighborhoods, improving the overall livability and safety of compact towns and cities. 6

Social Equity:

Social Equity The National Academy of Public Administration defines the term as: “The fair, just and equitable management of all institutions serving the public directly or by contract; the fair, just and equitable distribution of public services and implementation of public policy; and The commitment to promote fairness, justice, and equity in the formation of public policy.” 7

Social Equity:

Social Equity In 1968, H. George Frederickson came up with "a theory of social equity and put it forward as the 'third pillar' of public administration." Frederickson was concerned that those in public administration were making the mistake of assuming that citizen A is the same as citizen B; ignoring social and economic conditions. His goal: for social equity to take on the same "status as economy and efficiency as values or principles to which public administration should adhere." 8

Social Equity:

Social Equity "Social Equity implies fair access to livelihood, education, and resources; full participation in the political and cultural life of the Community; and self-determination in meeting Fundamental Needs. Social Equity is the cornerstone of Social Capital, which cannot be maintained for a few at the expense of the many. "Social equity includes universal fulfillment of the most fundamental human needs along with broad access to meaningful work, while respecting the enormous range of life circumstances and personal goals which may drive people to seek different kinds of livelihood." 9

Educational Equity:

Educational Equity Educational Equity , also referred to as Equity In Education , is a measure of achievement, fairness, and opportunity in education. The study of education equity is often linked with the study of excellence and equity. 10

Educational Equity:

Educational Equity Educational equity is dependent on two main factors. The first is fairness, which implies that factors specific to one's personal conditions should not interfere with the potential of academic success. The second important factor is inclusion, which refers to a comprehensive standard that applies to everyone in a certain education system. These two factors are closely related and are dependent on each other for true academic success of an educational system. 11

Educational Equity:

Educational Equity The growing importance of education equity is based on the premise that now, more than ever before, an individual’s level of education is directly correlated to the quality of life he or she will live in the future. Therefore, an academic system that practices educational equity is a strong foundation of a society that is fair and thriving. However, inequity in education is challenging to avoid, and can be broken down into inequity due to socioeconomic standing, race, gender or disability. 12

Social Justice:

Social Justice Social Justice is "justice in terms of the distribution of wealth, opportunities, and privileges within a society". Classically, "justice" (especially corrective justice or distributive justice) ensured that individuals both fulfilled their societal roles and received what was due from society. 13

Social Justice:

Social Justice Social justice assigns rights and duties in the institutions of society, which enables people to receive the basic benefits and burdens of cooperation. The relevant institutions can include education, health care, social security, labour rights, as well as a broader system of public services, progressive taxation and regulation of markets, to ensure fair distribution of wealth, equal opportunity, equality of outcome, and no gross social injustice. 14

Social Justice:

Social Justice This applies to one person who represents a small group (e.g., the organizer of a social event setting a dress code) as equally as it does to national governments, which are ultimate trustees, holding representative powers for the benefit of all citizens within their territorial boundaries. Governments that fail to provide for welfare of their citizens according to the principles of justice are not legitimate. 15

Public Administration:

Public Administration Public Administration is the implementation of government policy and also an academic discipline that studies this implementation and prepares civil servants for working in the public service. As a "field of inquiry with a diverse scope" its "fundamental goal... is to advance management and policies so that government can function." 16

Public Administration:

Public Administration Public administration is "centrally concerned with the organization of government policies and programs as well as the behavior of officials (usually non-elected) formally responsible for their conduct". Many unelected public servants can be considered to be public administrators, including heads of city, county, regional, state and federal departments such as municipal budget directors, human resources (H.R.) administrators, city managers, census managers, state mental health directors, and cabinet secretaries. Public administrators are public servants working in public departments and agencies, at all levels of government. 17

Public Administration:

Public Administration In the United States of America, Woodrow Wilson is considered the father of public administration. He first formally recognized public administration in an 1887 article entitled "The Study of Administration." The future president wrote that "it is the object of administrative study to discover, first, what government can properly and successfully do, and, secondly, how it can do these proper things with the utmost possible efficiency and at the least possible cost either of money or of energy." 18

Public Administration Theory:

Public Administration Theory Public Administration Theory is the amalgamation of history, organizational theory, social theory, political theory and related studies focused on the meanings, structures and functions of public service in all its forms. A standard course of study in PhD dedicated to public administration, public administration theory often recounts major historical foundations for the study of bureaucracy as well as epistemological issues associated with public service as a profession and as an academic field. 19

Public Administration Theory:

Public Administration Theory Important figures of study include: Max Weber, Frederick Winslow Taylor, Luther Gulick , Mary Parker Follett, Chester Barnard, Herbert A. Simon, and Dwight Waldo. Herbert Simon advanced a public administration theory that was informed by positivism. The influence of positivism today can be seen in journals such as the Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory and the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management. 20

Public Administration Theory:

Public Administration Theory In more recent times, the field has had three main branches: new public management, classic public administration and postmodern public administration theory. The last grouping is often viewed as manifest in the Public Administration Theory Network (PAT-NET) and its publication, Administrative Theory & Praxis. 21

Civil Society:

Civil Society Civil Society is the "aggregate of non-governmental organizations and institutions that manifest interests and will of citizens." Civil society includes the family and the private sphere, referred to as the "third sector" of society, distinct from government and business. 22

Civil Society:

Civil Society Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon defines civil society as: The aggregate of non-governmental organizations and institutions that manifest interests and will of citizens or Individuals and organizations in a society which are independent of the government. 23

Civil Society:

Civil Society Critics and activists currently often apply the term civil society to the domain of social life which needs to be protected against globalization, and to the sources of resistance thereto, because it (which) is seen as acting beyond boundaries and across different territories. On the other hand, others see globalization as a social phenomenon expanding the sphere of classical liberal values, which inevitably led to a larger role for civil society at the expense of politically derived state institutions. 24

Gender Equality:

Gender Equality Gender Equality , also known as sex equality , Gender Egalitarianism , Sexual Equality or Equality of The Genders, is the view that men and women should receive equal treatment, and should not be discriminated against based on gender. This is the objective of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which seeks to create equality in law and in social situations, such as in democratic activities and securing equal pay for equal work. 25

Gender Equality:

Gender Equality After World War II, a more general movement for gender equality developed based on women's liberation and feminism. The central issue was that the rights of women should be the same as of men. The United Nations and other international agencies have adopted several conventions, toward the promotion of gender equality. 26

Gender Equality:

Gender Equality There has been criticism from some feminists towards the political discourse and policies employed in order to achieve the items of "progress" in gender equality, with critics arguing that these gender equality strategies are superficial: Insofar that they do not seek to challenge social structures of male domination, and only aim at improving the situation of women within the societal framework of subordination of women to men. 27

Gender Equality:

Gender Equality One of the criticisms of the gender equality policies is that they focus disproportionately on policies integrating women in public life and the working environment, such as equal pay; while ignoring what some feminist argue is the most urgent problem women face - the lack of bodily autonomy and control over their sexuality: Namely inadequate protection from domestic violence and sexual assault, and unequal intimate relations with male partners. 28

Administrative Law:

Administrative Law Administrative Law is the body of law that governs the activities of administrative agencies of government. Government agency action can include rulemaking, adjudication, or the enforcement of a specific regulatory agenda. Administrative law is considered a branch of public law. As a body of law, administrative law deals with the decision-making of administrative units of government (for example, tribunals, boards or commissions) that are part of a national regulatory scheme in such areas as police law, international trade, manufacturing, the environment, taxation, broadcasting, immigration and transport. 29

Administrative Law:

Administrative Law In the United States, many government agencies are organized under the executive branch of government, although a few are part of the judicial or legislative branches. In the federal government, the executive branch, led by the president, controls the federal executive departments, which are led by secretaries who are members of the United States Cabinet. The many independent agencies of the United States government created by statutes enacted by Congress exist outside of the federal executive departments but are still part of the executive branch. 30

Administrative Law:

Administrative Law Many of the independent agencies operate as miniature versions of the tripartite federal government, with the authority to "legislate" (through rulemaking), and to "execute" administrative goals (through agency enforcement personnel). Because the United States Constitution sets no limits on this tripartite authority of administrative agencies, Congress enacted the APA to establish fair administrative law procedures to comply with the constitutional requirements of due process. Agency procedures are drawn from four sources of authority: the APA , Organic Statutes , Agency Rules , and Informal Agency Practice . 31

Public Policy:

Public Policy Public Policy is the principled guide to action taken by the administrative executive branches of the state with regard to a class of issues in a manner consistent with law and institutional customs. The foundation of public policy is composed of national constitutional laws and regulations. Further substrates include both judicial interpretations and regulations which are generally authorized by legislation. 32

Public Policy:

Public Policy Strong public policy should solve problems efficiently and effectively, serve justice, support governmental institutions and policies, and encourage active citizenship. Other scholars define it as a system of "courses of action, regulatory measures, laws, and funding priorities concerning a given topic promulgated by a governmental entity or its representatives." Public policy is commonly embodied "in constitutions, legislative acts, and judicial decisions." 33

Public Policy:

Public Policy Public policy making can be characterized as a dynamic, complex, and interactive system through which public problems are identified and countered by creating new public policy or by reforming existing public policy. Public problems can originate in endless ways and require different policy responses (such as regulations, subsidies, quotas, and laws) on the local, national, or international level. Public policy making is a continuous process that has many feedback loops. 34

Politics:

Politics Politics (from Greek: πολιτικός politikos , definition "of, for, or relating to citizens") is the practice and theory of influencing other people. More narrowly, it refers to achieving and exercising positions of governance — organized control over a human community, particularly a state. Furthermore, politics is the study or practice of the distribution of power and resources within a given community (a usually hierarchically organized population) as well as the interrelationship(s) between communities. 35

Politics:

Politics There are many forms of political organization, including states, non-government organizations (NGOs) and international organizations such as the United Nations. States are perhaps the predominant institutional form of political governance, where a state is understood as an institution and a government is understood as the regime in power. According to Aristotle, states are classified into monarchies, aristocracies, timocracies , democracies, oligarchies, and tyrannies. 36

Politics:

Politics Global politics include different practices of political globalization in relation to questions of social power: from global patterns of governance to issues of globalizing conflict. Global politics also concerns the rise of global and international organizations . The United Nations has served as a forum for peace in a world threatened by nuclear war, "The invention of nuclear and space weapons has made war unacceptable as an instrument for achieving political ends.” 37

Social Exclusion:

Social Exclusion Social exclusion is the process in which individuals or entire communities of people are systematically blocked from (or denied full access to) various rights, opportunities and resources that are normally available to members of a different group, and which are fundamental to social integration within that particular group (e.g., housing, employment, healthcare, civic engagement, democratic participation, and due process) 38

Social Exclusion:

Social Exclusion Alienation or disenfranchisement resulting from social exclusion is often connected to a person's social class, educational status, childhood relationships, living standards, or personal choices in fashion. Such exclusionary forms of discrimination may also apply to people with a disability, minorities, members of the LGBT community, drug users, Care Leavers, "seniors", or young people. Anyone who appears to deviate in any way from the "perceived norm" of a population may thereby become subject to coarse or subtle forms of social exclusion. 39

Social Exclusion:

Social Exclusion Social Inclusion , the converse of social exclusion, is affirmative action to change the circumstances and habits that lead to (or have led to) social exclusion. The World Bank defines social inclusion as the process of improving the ability, opportunity, and dignity of people, disadvantaged on the basis of their identity, to take part in society. 40

Homelessness:

Homelessness Homelessness is the condition of people without a regular dwelling. People who are homeless are most often unable to acquire and maintain regular, safe, secure and adequate housing, or lack "fixed, regular, and adequate night-time residence." The term homeless may also include people whose primary night-time residence is in a homeless shelter, a warming center, a domestic violence shelter, a vehicle (including recreational vehicles and campers), squatting, cardboard boxes, a tent, tarpaulins, or other ad hoc housing situations. 41

Homelessness:

Homelessness Many cities also have street newspapers, which are publications designed to provide employment opportunity to homeless people. While some homeless have jobs, some must seek other methods to make a living. An estimated 100 million people worldwide were homeless in 2005. In western countries, the large majority of homeless are men (75–80%), with single males particularly overrepresented. Most countries provide a variety of services to assist homeless people. They often provide food, shelter and clothing and may be organized and run by community organizations (often with the help of volunteers) or by government departments. 42

Homelessness:

Homelessness The word unhoused refers to that segment of a homeless community who do not have ordinary lawful access to buildings in which to sleep, as referred to in the HUD definition as persons occupying "place not designed for ... sleeping accommodation for human beings. Teams of counters, often numbering in the hundreds in logistically complex volunteer efforts, seek out the unsheltered in various nooks and crannies. HUD requires jurisdictions which participate in Continuum of Care grant programs to count their homeless every two years. 43

Questions & Answers:

Questions & Answers 44

Thank You!:

Thank You! The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 1735 Market Street, Suite 3750 100 Edgewood Avenue, Suite 1690 Philadelphia, PA 19102 Atlanta, GA 30303 (878) 222-0100 Voice | Data | SMS www.TheAdvocacyFoundation.org © The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 2015 (All Rights Reserved) 45

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