Culturally Relevant Programming - Community Culture

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Culturally Relevant Programming - Community Culture

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Culturally Relevant Programming Community Culture:

Culturally Relevant Programming Community Culture The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 1735 Market Street, Suite 3750 100 Edgewood Avenue, Suite 1690 Philadelphia, PA 19102 Atlanta, GA 30303 (878) 222-0100 Voice | Data | SMS www.TheAdvocacyFoundation.org © The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 2015 (All Rights Reserved)

Biblical Authority:

Biblical Authority 1 Corinthians 12:12-30 (NIV) Unity and Diversity in the Body 12  Just as a body, though one, has many parts, but all its many parts form one body, so it is with Christ. 13  For we were all baptized by one Spirit so as to form one body—whether Jews or Gentiles, slave or free—and we were all given the one Spirit to drink. 14  Even so the body is not made up of one part but of many. 15  Now if the foot should say, “Because I am not a hand, I do not belong to the body,” it would not for that reason stop being part of the body. 16  And if the ear should say, “Because I am not an eye, I do not belong to the body,” it would not for that reason stop being part of the body. 17  If the whole body were an eye, where would the sense of hearing be? If the whole body were an ear, where would the sense of smell be? 18  But in fact God has placed the parts in the body, every one of them, just as he wanted them to be. 19  If they were all one part, where would the body be? 20  As it is, there are many parts, but one body. 21  The eye cannot say to the hand, “I don’t need you!” And the head cannot say to the feet, “I don’t need you!” 22  On the contrary, those parts of the body that seem to be weaker are indispensable, 23  and the parts that we think are less honorable we treat with special honor. And the parts that are unpresentable are treated with special modesty, 24  while our presentable parts need no special treatment. But God has put the body together, giving greater honor to the parts that lacked it, 25  so that there should be no division in the body, but that its parts should have equal concern for each other. 26  If one part suffers, every part suffers with it; if one part is honored, every part rejoices with it. 27  Now you are the body of Christ, and each one of you is a part of it. 28  And God has placed in the church first of all apostles, second prophets, third teachers, then miracles, then gifts of healing, of helping, of guidance, and of different kinds of tongues. 29  Are all apostles? Are all prophets? Are all teachers? Do all work miracles? 30  Do all have gifts of healing? Do all speak in tongues? Do all interpret? 2

Introduction Cultural Competence:

Introduction Cultural Competence 3 Cultural Competence refers to an ability to interact effectively with people of different cultures and socio-economic backgrounds, particularly in the context of human resources, non-profit organizations, and government agencies whose employees work with persons from different cultural/ethnic backgrounds. Cultural competence comprises four components: (a) Awareness of one's own cultural worldview, (b) Attitude towards cultural differences, (c) Knowledge of different cultural practices and worldviews, and (d) Cross-cultural skills. Developing cultural competence results in an ability to understand, communicate with, and effectively interact with people across cultures.

Introduction Cultural Competence:

4 With the larger population of minorities and racial integration during the 1960s and 1970s, the public school system of the United States had to grapple with issues of cultural sensitivity as most teachers in public school system came from white, middle class backgrounds. Most of these teachers were educated, primarily English speaking, and primarily from the Western European cultures. They often had trouble trying to communicate with speakers of limited English proficiency, let alone people of vastly different value systems and normative behaviors from that of Anglo-European culture. The achievement gap between cultural minority and majority students suggests that some sort of communication disconnect often occurs in minority classrooms because cultural mismatch between teachers and students is common … Introduction Cultural Competence

Cultural Relativism:

5 Cultural Relativism Cultural Relativism is the principle that an individual human's beliefs and activities should be understood by others in terms of that individual's own culture. Cultural relativism was in part a response to Western ethnocentrism. Ethnocentrism may take obvious forms, in which one consciously believes that one's people's arts are the most beautiful, values the most virtuous, and beliefs the most truthful. Franz Boas argued that one's culture may mediate and thus limit one's perceptions in less obvious ways. He understood "culture" to include not only certain tastes in food, art, and music, or beliefs about religion. He assumed a much broader notion of culture…

Cultural Relativism:

6 Cultural Relativism The principle of cultural relativity does not mean that because the members of some savage tribe are allowed to behave in a certain way that this fact gives intellectual warrant for such behavior in all groups. Cultural relativity means, on the contrary, that the appropriateness of any positive or negative custom must be evaluated with regard to how this habit fits with other group habits. Having several wives makes economic sense among herders, not among hunters. While breeding a healthy scepticism as to the eternity of any value prized by a particular people, anthropology does not as a matter of theory deny the existence of moral absolutes. Rather, the use of the comparative method provides a scientific means of discovering such absolutes.

Culturally Relevant Teaching:

7 Culturally Relevant Teaching Culturally Relevant or Responsive Teaching is a pedagogy grounded in teachers' displaying cultural competence: skill at teaching in a cross-cultural or multicultural setting. They enable each student to relate course content to his or her cultural context. While the term culturally relevant teaching often deals specifically with instruction of African American students in the United States, it has been proven to be an effective form of pedagogy for students of all racial and ethnic backgrounds. For instance, in Canada, research reflects the need to bridge the gap between traditional Aboriginal education and Western education systems by including spirituality in Aboriginal educational practices. By making education culturally relevant, it is thought to improve academic achievement.

Culturally Relevant Teaching:

8 Culturally Relevant Teaching Culturally relevant teaching was made popular by Dr. Gloria Ladson-Billings in the early 1990s, the term she created was defined as one "that empowers students to maintain cultural integrity, while succeeding academically." This has become more widely known and accepted in the education field. Researchers argue that there are gaps in academic achievement between mainstream culture and immigrants or ethnic cultural groups. Early theories suggest, the disconnect between these groups were due to student/teacher language difficulties or that ethnic cultures don’t value education as heavily as the Western culture does, often placing, culturally diverse students unnecessarily in special education classes simply because of linguistic and cultural differences.

Ethnography:

9 Ethnography Ethnography (from Greek ἔθνος ethnos "folk, people, nation" and γράφω grapho "I write") is the systematic study of people and cultures. It is designed to explore cultural phenomena where the researcher observes society from the point of view of the subject of the study. Ethnography, as the presentation of empirical data on human societies and cultures, was pioneered in the biological, social, and cultural branches of anthropology, but it has also become popular in the social sciences

Ethnography:

10 Ethnography There are different forms of ethnography, confessional ethnography, life history, feminist ethnography etc. Two popular forms of ethnography are Realist Ethnography and Critical Ethnography. Realist Ethnography : The ethnographer stays as omniscient correspondent of actualities out of sight. The realist reports information in a measured style uncontaminated by individual predisposition, political objectives and judgment. It's an objective study of the situation. It's composed from a third persons perspective by getting the data from the members on the site. Critical Ethnography : Is a kind of ethnographic research in which the creators advocate for the liberation of groups which are marginalized in society. Critical researchers typically are politically minded people who look for to take a stand in opposition to inequality and domination.

Cultural Diversity:

11 Cultural Diversity Cultural Diversity is the quality of diverse or different cultures, as opposed to monoculture, as in the global monoculture, or a homogenization of cultures. The phrase cultural diversity can also refer to having different cultures respect each other's differences . The phrase "cultural diversity" is also sometimes used to mean the variety of human societies or cultures in a specific region, or in the world as a whole.

Cultural Diversity:

12 Cultural Diversity As well as the more obvious cultural differences that exist between people, such as language, dress and traditions, there are also significant variations in the way societies organize themselves, in their shared conception of morality, and in the ways they interact with their environment. The Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity adopted by UNESCO in 2001 is a legal instrument that recognizes cultural diversity as "common heritage of humanity" and considers its safeguarding to be a concrete and ethical imperative inseparable from respect for human dignity.

Cultural Movement:

13 Cultural Movement A Cultural Movement is a change in the way a number of different disciplines approach their work. This embodies all art forms, the sciences, and philosophies. Historically, different nations or regions of the world have gone through their own independent sequence of movements in culture, but as world communications have accelerated this geographical distinction has become less distinct.

Cultural Movement:

14 Cultural Movement When cultural movements go through revolutions from one to the next, genres tend to get attacked and mixed up, and often new genres are generated and old ones fade. These changes are often reactions against the prior cultural form, which typically has grown stale and repetitive.

MultiCulturalism:

15 MultiCulturalism Multiculturalism describes the existence, acceptance, or promotion of multiple cultural traditions within a single jurisdiction, usually considered in terms of the culture associated with an ethnic group. This can happen when a jurisdiction is created or expanded by amalgamating areas with two or more different cultures (e.g. Quebec and Canada) or through immigration from different jurisdictions around the world.

MultiCulturalism:

16 MultiCulturalism Multicultural ideologies or policies vary widely, ranging from the advocacy of equal respect to the various cultures in a society, to a policy of promoting the maintenance of cultural diversity, to policies in which people of various ethnic and religious groups are addressed by the authorities as defined by the group to which they belong. Multiculturalism that promotes maintaining the distinctiveness of multiple cultures is often contrasted to other settlement policies such as social integration, cultural assimilation and racial segregation. Multiculturalism has been described as a "salad bowl" or "cultural mosaic" rather than a "melting pot".

Social Cohesion:

17 Social Cohesion When discussing social groups, a group is said to be in a state of cohesion when its members possess bonds linking them to one another and to the group as a whole. Although cohesion is a multi-faceted process, it can be broken down into four main components: Social Relations , Task Relations , Perceived Unity , and Emotions .

Social Cohesion:

18 Social Cohesion The bonds that link group members to one another and to their group as a whole are not believed to develop spontaneously. Over the years, social scientists have explained the phenomenon of group cohesiveness in different ways. Some have suggested that cohesiveness among group members develops from a heightened sense of belonging, teamwork, interpersonal and group-level attraction. Attraction, task commitment and group pride are also said to cause group cohesion.

InterCultural Relations:

19 InterCultural Relations Intercultural Relations , sometimes called Intercultural Studies , is a relatively new formal field of social science studies. It is a practical, multi-field discipline designed to train its students to understand, communicate, and accomplish specific goals outside of their own cultures.

InterCultural Relations:

20 InterCultural Relations Intercultural Relations involves, at a fundamental level, learning how to see oneself and the world through the eyes of another. It is a broad, rather than deep, discipline that seeks to prepare students for interaction with cultures both similar to their own (e.g. a separate socioeconomic group in one's own country) or very different from their own (e.g. an American businessman in a small Amazon tribal society).

InterCultural Relations:

21 InterCultural Relations The study of intercultural relations incorporates many different academic disciplines. As a field, it is most closely tied to anthropology and sociology, although a degree program in Intercultural Relations or Intercultural Studies may also include the study of history, research methods, urban studies, gender studies, public health, many various natural sciences, human development, political science, psychology, and linguistics or other language training. Often, Intercultural programs are designed to translate these academic disciplines into a practical training curricula. The origins of the practical use of multi-field Intercultural Relations can be traced back to Christian missionaries seeking to relate the Christian gospel to other cultures in effective, ethical and culturally sensitive ways.

InterCultural Competence:

22 InterCultural Competence Intercultural competence is the ability to communicate effectively and appropriately with people of other cultures: Appropriately . Valued rules, norms, and expectations of the relationship are not violated significantly. Effectively . Valued goals or rewards (relative to costs and alternatives) are accomplished. In interactions with people from foreign cultures, a person who is interculturally competent understands the culture-specific concepts of perception, thinking, feeling, and acting. Intercultural competence is also called "cross-cultural competence" (3C).

InterCultural Competence:

23 InterCultural Competence Cultures can be different not only between continents or nations but also within the same company and even within the same family. The differences may be ethical, ethnic, geographical, historical, moral, political, or religious. The basic requirements for intercultural competence are empathy, an understanding of other people's behaviors and ways of thinking, and the ability to express one's own way of thinking. It is a balance, situatively adapted, among four parts: Knowledge (about other cultures and other people's behaviors) Empathy (understanding the feelings and needs of other people) Self-Confidence (knowledge of one's own desires, strengths, weaknesses, and emotional stability) Cultural Identity (knowledge of one's own culture)

Cultural Intelligence:

24 Cultural Intelligence Cultural Intelligence , Cultural Quotient or CQ , is a term used in business, education, government and academic research. Cultural intelligence can be understood as the capability to relate and work effectively across cultures. Originally, the term cultural intelligence and the abbreviation "CQ" was developed by the research done by Soon Ang and Linn Van Dyne as a researched-based way of measuring and predicting intercultural performance.

Cultural Intelligence:

25 Cultural Intelligence Cultural intelligence or CQ is measured on a scale, similar to that used to measure an individual's intelligence quotient. People with higher CQ's are regarded as better able to successfully blend into any environment, using more effective business practices, than those with a lower CQ. CQ is assessed using the academically validated assessment created by Linn Van Dyne and Soon Ang. Cultural intelligence research has been cited and peer reviewed in more than seventy academic journals. The research and application of cultural intelligence is being driven by the Cultural Intelligence Center in the U.S. and Nanyang Business School in Singapore.

Cultural Intelligence:

26 Cultural Intelligence The four capabilities stem from the intelligence-based approach to intercultural adjustment and performance. CQ-Drive CQ-Drive is a person's interest and confidence in functioning effectively in culturally diverse settings. CQ-Knowledge CQ-Knowledge is a person's knowledge about how cultures are similar and how cultures are different. CQ-Strategy CQ-Strategy is how a person makes sense of culturally diverse experiences. It occurs when people make judgments about their own thought processes and those of others. CQ-Action CQ-Action is a person's capability to adapt verbal and nonverbal behavior to make it appropriate to diverse cultures. It involves having a flexible repertoire of behavioral responses that suit a variety of situations.

Questions & Answers:

Questions & Answers 27

Thank You!:

Thank You! The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 1735 Market Street, Suite 3750 100 Edgewood Avenue, Suite 1690 Philadelphia, PA 19102 Atlanta, GA 30303 (878) 222-0100 Voice | Data | SMS www.TheAdvocacyFoundation.org © The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. 2015 (All Rights Reserved)

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