DRAW 1 Lesson 04 Crosshatch Shading (Rocks)

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Iguana Art Academy instructor Timothy Chambers introduces crosshatch shading in Lesson 04 of Drawing Essentials 1.

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DRAWING ESSENTIALS Teacher: Timothy Chambers Lesson 04 Crosshatch Scale l Crosshatch Drawing

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Welcome to Drawing Essentials , Lesson 04. Today you will be applying your crosshatching skills to a drawing. Here’s the plan for today: The Art Life: Trying different flavors Review: Light/shade principles IMOFA: Make sure you have your value scales (also good for free admission!) Lesson: Another type of value scale, crosshatch II Your turn: AS4: cross-scale & hatch-a-rock Let’s get started…

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A painter sees the world as a painting. Everything we artists see is viewed as a work of art. A good artist studies life around him/her. The amazing Michelangelo said “we humbly and honorably copy what God has created.” I see us as not merely copying, but responding to the wonders of the world we live in. I enjoy painting still- lifes now and then. The challenge here was to convey the different surfaces of dried flowers, porcelain vase, fabric, and glass. Flowers and Glass by Timothy Chambers, Oil ART LIFE

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For a while, early in my career, I painted in watercolor. It’s a wonderful medium. Someday I hope to rediscover it! Brass and Orange by Timothy Chambers, Watercolor

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Changes by Timothy Chambers, Lithograph 1981 Here’s a throwback…I did this 4-color lithograph in high school. That’s me. The piece is called “ Changes”. The concept was to look at the transformation from the age of machines to the digital age. The lithograph process is really cool, very different. You draw on a slab of limestone, then etch the stone, then print off of it. It’s similar to the etching process, but you have a greater range of shading values. Do a search on “ stone lithography process ” to see how this art is done. This video shows the process nicely.

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REVIEW

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Review of elements of shading:

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Review of value masses:

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We’re going to have part of our lesson at the IMOFA today. We get in free if we have our value scales with us. As we view various paintings and drawings, use your value scale to tell me what the value is of certain areas of the artworks. Ready? IM FA

Okay, holding your value scale up against the painting below, as shown, you’re going to discern the different values that I point out with the gray circle. Hint: the value of the circle is a middle value gray (about Value 4.5).:

Okay, holding your value scale up against the painting below, as shown, you’re going to discern the different values that I point out with the gray circle. Hint: the value of the circle is a middle value gray (about Value 4.5). Margaret McWethy - Cherries

As I point to an area, state what you think the value is. Remember, the value of the circle is about a middle gray (Value 4.5).:

As I point to an area, state what you think the value is. Remember, the value of the circle is about a middle gray (Value 4.5). Margaret McWethy - Cherries

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Titian- Helmet, 1510

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Albrecht Durer- A Young Hare, 1502

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Chinese Song Dynasty

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Mary Cassatt - Child in a Straw Hat, c. 1886

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Margaret McWethy - Oh Pears Exclamark

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Cedric Egeli - Outdoor Model, Contemporary

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Daniel Pinkham- Peace Sheep

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Oswald Chambers- Harbor, 1902

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Frederic Remington- Against the Sunset

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Cape School Student- Block Study

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As you can see, your value scales are a valuable tool for helping you see the right value of the things you draw. As this course goes on, you’ll find that getting the right value plays a huge role in making things look three-dimensional. Let’s move on to your assignment!

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1 crosshatch scale 2 hatch-a-rock LESSON

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MATERIALS For today’s assignment, you’ll be using three pencils (grades 2H or 4H, HB, and 6B (marked on the end of your pencil), a pencil sharpener, and if needed, a kneaded eraser. And your sketchbook. 

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Two pencils, two methods…which method do you think gives more control?

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Two pencils, two methods…which method do you think gives more control?

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Two pencils, two methods…which method do you think gives more control?

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CROSSHATCH SCALE (hatch-a-rock warm-up) To warm up for your Hatch-a-Rock drawing, we are going to do a value scale. However, we will do this one a little different than the ones you did for AS3. You’ll find a handy print-out worksheet for this exercise on your lesson page. First, though, I will walk you through the exercise,

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CROSSHATCH SCALE (hatch-a-rock warm-up) A closer look at the worksheet. Notice that I guide you step by step through all nine values. There are three blank value scales for you to practice crosshatching with different pencil grades or mediums (marker, ink pen, etc.).

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CROSSHATCH SCALE You can see how the crosshatch strokes of each layer are drawn in a different direction than the previous layers. You might start with a horizontal stroke, followed by a left-oblique stroke (going from upper-left to lower right), then a right-oblique stroke, followed by a vertical stroke. Each box has one additional layer of lines (strokes) than the previous, so every box is one step darker than the one before it, and one step lighter than the one after it. Every layer of pencil adds darkness (aka value).

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Let’s walk step-by-step through this exercise. As you can see to the right, the scale is built by overlapping the previous rectangles with a new layer of value. Q: Can you tell me why we work backwards from Value 9 to Value 1? CROSSHATCH SCALE

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Let’s walk step-by-step through this exercise. As you can see to the right, the scale is built by overlapping the previous rectangles with a new layer of value. Q: Can you tell me why we work backwards from Value 9 to Value 1? A: We start with the value that will have the most layers. Value 9 will have 8 overlapping layers of value by the time we do Value 1. CROSSHATCH SCALE

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You can see how the crosshatch strokes of each layer are drawn in a different direction than the previous layers. CROSSHATCH SCALE

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You can see how the crosshatch strokes of each layer are drawn in a different direction than the previous layers. You might start with a horizontal stroke, followed by a left-oblique stroke (going from upper-left to lower right), then a right-oblique stroke, followed by a vertical stroke. CROSSHATCH SCALE

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You can see how the crosshatch strokes of each layer are drawn in a different direction than the previous layers. You might start with a horizontal stroke, followed by a left-oblique stroke (going from upper-left to lower right), then a right-oblique stroke, followed by a vertical stroke. Each box has an extra layer of pencil strokes in it, making it a little darker than the preceding layer. It’s a fun way to have a thought-out, controlled gradation of values from light to dark. CROSSHATCH SCALE

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A or B Warmed up? Ready to go? Okay, let’s start with a step-by-step demonstration of your assignment. Just follow along and do the same. The nice artist below is using the same setup you will use for the assignment.

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For this assignment, you’re going to do two drawings- one of a jagged rock, and a second of a smooth rock. You can do both drawings on one sheet of your 9x12” (23x30cm) sketchbook. Draw a light line at the center of your page to divide it in two. You’ll draw the jagged rock on the top half, and the round rock on the bottom half. hatch-a-rock

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Here is an example of this assignment by a student of mine. You can spend as much time as you want to shade your rock. The more strokes you patiently put down, the richer (darker, contrastier ) your drawing will look. Building layers takes time, but the results can be beautiful. hatch-a-rock

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One more student example of the assignment. The jagged rock on top, the smooth, round one on the bottom. Notice that both drawings nicely fill their half of the page. Not too big (crowded), nor too small. Let’s get started with the demonstration. hatch-a-rock

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I will show you how I go about doing one of the drawings. First, lightly sketch in the outline of the rock. Make it big enough! A or B

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Lightly indicate the light and shadow masses. Notice- no dark lines. If you go too dark, they are hard to overcome later. A or B

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Sketch in the cast shadow mass. It helps to squint to see past the little details inside the big masses.

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Block in the shadow masses as one big shape. “Blocking in” means lightly filling in a mass as a solid shape. Notice again, that I am not getting dark, but just want to indicate the shape.

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Show the difference in values between the cast shadow and the shadow mass of the rock. Ask yourself “What are the lightest and darkest values in this setup?” Then try and portray all the values in between those two.

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Show the light part of the rock not by outlining it, but by adding the background value behind the light part. Look for opportunities to show the shape of something not by outline by one value against another.

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Add more shading where you think it needs it. Remember, you achieve your darker values not all at once but by steadily building up layers of pencil strokes. That’s it- a very simple, logical process! You’re done!

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ANATOMY OF A CROSSHATCH STROKE The way you achieve a smooth, straight pencil stroke is by moving not your fingers, but your arm. Keep your wrist firm and let your arm swing from right to left (lefties) and left to right if you’re a righty.

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Here is an example of how patient overlapping- i.e. crosshatching- gives you darker and darker values. Work with light pressure, and… Take. Your. Time. I encourage you to practice crosshatching often. Notice the difference in the heaviness (pressure upon the paper), the thickness of the lines, change of directions…). You’ll be a pro in no time, and you can practice anywhere! ANATOMY OF A CROSSHATCH STROKE

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Another helpful tip for drawing beautiful straight lines is to move your hand/arm towards the side of your drawing hand. In other words, if you are right-handed, move your hand from left to right. If you’re left-handed, then move your hand from right to left. right-handed left-handed ANATOMY OF A CROSSHATCH STROKE: RIGHTIES & LEFTIES Try and see if you can not move your fingers but let your arm pivot on your elbow, moving your wrist and hand together, holding the pencil away from the tip.

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A few more rock drawings by Drawing Essentials students…

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A few rock drawings by Drawing Essentials students…

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A few rock drawings by Drawing Essentials students…

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A few rock drawings by Drawing Essentials students…

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A few rock drawings by Drawing Essentials students…

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Reminders (drawing tips): Hold the pencil at the opposite end from the drawing tip for more control. Ask yourself “Where are my darkest and lightest shades in what I’m drawing?” Use your H pencils for your initial sketch (your lay-in) so that your sketch is light, not staining the paper. Use your B’s for shading, and save your darkest shades for where it’s needed. Avoid erasing if you can help it, as it wears the paper down and can lead to timid drawings that lack life and vitality. Build up your values patiently using crosshatch as I demonstrated. Avoid simply zig-zagging, rushing, or laziness. Patient strokes look beautiful. :) Rembrandt- A Beggar with a Wooden Leg, 1630

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AS4: hatch-a-rock Assignment Goal : Observe contour and value changes Materials needed : 4H, HB, & 6B pencils, sketchbook, kneaded eraser, two rocks, and Crosshatch Value Worksheet (see pdf link below). Time: 60-90 minutes (or more if you desire) AS4 Guidelines : Complete the Crosshatch Value Worksheet as shown in class. Should take about 10 minutes. Be consistent so you get even shading, no jumps. Find two rocks: 1) a jagged rock, and 2) a smooth roundish rock. Set up one at a time on a table with a single strong light source (a bright window works great!). Avoid direct sunlight or multiple interior lights on it ). Put material under it if you like for interest (folds, shadow, texture, etc.). Continued…

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Divide your page in half with a light line (each half being 6”x9”). On each half, sketch a rock, keeping in mind to: Avoid any dark lines in your lay-in Lightly sketch in the light mass, shadow mass, the cast shadow the value differences between the rock and the areas around it (the masses, table, tablecloth, background, etc.). Use your value scale to figure out the right values. Review. Lastly, walk away from your drawing, then come back and see if there's anything that jumps out to you as being 'off'. Ask someone else if they see anything that seems out of place or different from the rock you’re drawing. Shoot/Scan and edit your drawing. Review the photo and editing tips in Student Resources for help. Save your edited image, naming it exactly as “FirstName-LastName,AS4” (e.g. “Tim-Chambers,AS4”) Submit by Sunday evening for feedback in the IAG. AS4: hatch-a-rock

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DRAWING ESSENTIALS Teacher: Timothy Chambers End of Lesson 04

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