Alcohol and You

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Category: Education
     
 

Presentation Description

Presentation about the effects of alcohol on the body

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Presentation Transcript

Slide 1:

Alcohol and You

Slide 2:

Alcohol Awareness

Slide 3:

Intoxicating Facts

Slide 4:

The human brain doesn’t fully develop until the early 20’s. Alcohol use before then drastically impacts learning and memory. Source: www.mystudentbody.com

Slide 5:

There are more than 150 medications that should not be mixed with alcohol. For example, drinking alcohol while taking acetaminophen (Tylenol ® ) can increase the risk of serious liver damage. Source: www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov

Slide 6:

Approximately 700,000 students per year are assaulted by a drinking student. Source: www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov

Slide 7:

Research suggests that women are more vulnerable than men to many alcohol- induced problems. Some of these include: Organ Damage Trauma Legal and interpersonal difficulties Source: www.niaaa.nih.gov

Slide 8:

Alcohol affects men and women differently. Women become more impaired than men from drinking the same amount of alcohol. This is because women: Are generally smaller in size Have less body water Have less dehydrogenase (Dehydrogenase is an enzyme in the stomach that breaks down alcohol.) Have more estrogen Source: www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov

Slide 9:

All of these beverages contain the same amount of alcohol: One 12-ounce bottle or can of beer One 12-ounce wine cooler One 5-ounce glass of wine 1.5 ounces of 80 proof distilled spirits Source: www.cdc.gov/alcohol/faqs.htm

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LOW RISK DRINKING 1 drink a day for women 2 drinks a day for men One drink is defined as: 12 oz of beer or wine cooler 5 oz of wine or 1.5 oz of 80 proof distilled spirits Source: www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov

Slide 11:

Alcohol is a central nervous system depressant. In small amounts it can have a relaxing effect. But, in large amounts it can cause impaired judgement, slurred speech, reduced reaction time, and difficulty walking. Source: www.cdc.gov/alcohol/faqs.htm

Slide 12:

What is alcohol? Ethyl alcohol or ethanol Produced by fermentation of yeast, sugars, and starches A psychoactive drug A central nervous system depressant Source: www.cdc.gov/alcohol/faqs.htm

Slide 13:

“Drunkenness” is caused by an overdose of alcohol. Source: www.cdc.gov/alcohol/faqs.htm

Slide 14:

If you have to drink increasingly larger amounts of alcohol to feel a buzz or get drunk then you are developing a tolerance . Tolerance is a warning sign that a more serious problem with alcohol is developing. Source: www.mystudentbody.com

Slide 15:

“No medical conditions, other than heart disease, cause more disability and premature death than alcohol-related problems.” Source: Hales, Diane. An Invitation to Health. 512.

Slide 16:

10 Steps to Responsible Drinking Don’t drink alone Don’t use alcohol as medicine Develop a party plan – set a drinking limit before you go out Alternate alcohol and nonalcoholic drinks Drink slowly Eat before and while you drink Be wary of mixed drinks which can speed alcohol to the blood and brain Don’t make drinking the primary focus of the event Learn to say no Stay safe Source: Hales, Diane. An Invitation to Health. 521.

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References Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. (2004). Alcohol and Public Health. Questions and Answers on Alcohol Consumption. www.cdc.gov/alcohol/faqs.htm , accessed August 2004. Hales, Diane. (2003). An Invitation to Health (pp. 512). California: Wadsworth. Hales, Diane. (2003). An Invitation to Health (pp. 521). California: Wadsworth. MyStudentBody.com. Alcohol: Alcohol & the Brain. !Did You Know?. www.mystudentbody.com/Alcohol/topic/Article.asp?ArticleID=169&TopicID= 1, accessed August 2004. MyStudentBody.com. Alcohol: Signs of Trouble: Tolerance. www.mystudentbody.com/alcohol/course/course_article.asp?ArticleID=174&TopicID=1 , accessed August 2004. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. College Drinking. (2002). NIH Publication No. 99–4323. Just the Facts: What You Don’t Know Can Harm You. www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov/facts/alcohol.aspx , accessed August 2004. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. College Drinking. Just the Facts: How to Cut Down on Your Drinking. www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov/facts/cutdrinking.aspx , accessed August 2004. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. (1999). Publication No. 46. Alcohol Alert: Are Women More Vulnerable to Alcohol’s Affects? www.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/aa46.htm , accessed August 2004. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Just the Facts: FAQ on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov/facts/q-a.aspx#question16 , accessed August 2004.

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