Internet safety and schools

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Internet Safety for Schools: What are the dangers? How do we keep our students safe? : 

Internet Safety for Schools: What are the dangers? How do we keep our students safe? By Wendy Torres Roland Park Country School http://tinyurl.com/cfxsjr

Slide 2: 

Welcome!

Purpose: : 

Purpose: Identify and understand the risks and dangers that exist in the online community for our students. Identify ways to keep students safe. NO ADVANCED TECHNOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE REQUIRED!

So why should schools care about Internet Safety? : 

So why should schools care about Internet Safety? On October 10, 2008 the “Broadband Data Improvement Act” / “Protecting Children in the 21st Century Act” was signed into law. For schools and districts the law means that elementary and secondary schools having computers with Internet access will not receive federal funding through the E-Rate Program for Internet service, Internet access or internal connections without certifying that their Internet safety policy includes Internet safety education. Specifically, the mandatory Internet safety education must include lessons on cyber bullying awareness and response as well as teaching appropriate online behaviors for students on social networking sites and in chat rooms.

But these kids do a lot of the behaviors off campus… : 

But these kids do a lot of the behaviors off campus… True, but as educators we know that students bring the baggage they are carrying into our classrooms. As educators, we have to know what our students are bringing with them so we can help them in the learning process.

What are the risks and dangers that exist on the Internet? : 

What are the risks and dangers that exist on the Internet? Computer security issues (viruses, spyware, adware, etc) Cyber Bullying Cyber Predators

Cyber Bullying : 

Cyber Bullying

What is Cyber bullying? : 

What is Cyber bullying? Cyber bullying- a means of using online resources to tease, humiliate, embarrass, harass, and intimidate people on the Internet. Cyber bullying is a serious social problem that needs to be addressed by parents, schools and educators. Remember just because it happens on the Internet does not diminish the destructive impact it has on children.

Consider this… : 

Consider this… In a survey done by I Safe America of over 18 thousand children 35% of kids have been threatened online 42% of kids have been bullied while online 53% of kids admit to bullying others online 58% have not told their parents or an adult

Few examples of Cyber Bullying: : 

Few examples of Cyber Bullying: A threatening e-mail Nasty Instant Messages Repeated notes sent to the cell phone A website set up to mock others “Borrowing” someone’s screen name and pretending to be them while posting a message Forwarding supposedly private messages, pictures, or video to others.

The first known case of cyber bullying… : 

The first known case of cyber bullying… The Star Wars Kid 15 year video taped himself goofing around Classmates uploaded video to the Internet without his knowledge or consent Someone added effects to mock him Now over 100 versions mocking him exist on the Internet.

Why do kids cyber bully each other? : 

Why do kids cyber bully each other? Cyber bullying is often motivated by frustration, anger, revenge or entertainment. Most kids who cyber bully don’t think it is a big deal because it occurs online. Many kids mistakenly believe that because the communication is online that is harmless, funny and that they will never get caught. Plus, many students do not think about the consequences of their actions. They don’t think in terms of how their actions may affect themselves or others in the future. Picture from http://www.allstate.com/content/refresh-attachments/Brain-Ad.pdf

Possible consequences of cyber bullying: : 

Possible consequences of cyber bullying: The impact on a child’s psyche can be enormous. They get the feeling that their life is ruined, that their reputation is destroyed forever and that they will have to live with the defamation for the rest of their lives.

Piper’s story : 

Piper’s story http://tinyurl.com/kosdrv

Faces of Cyber bullying: : 

Faces of Cyber bullying: Ryan Halligan 13 years old. Committed suicide because of cyber bullying. Megan Meier: 14 committed suicide because of a fake myspace account that was created solely for the purpose of harassing her. http://www.ryanpatrickhalligan.org/ http://www.meganmeierfoundation.org/

Faces of cyber bullying : 

Faces of cyber bullying Jesse Logan: 18 committed suicide due to sexting Sexting video Article on possible consequences of sexting.

So what can schools do to deal with cyber bullying? : 

So what can schools do to deal with cyber bullying? Create and establish an AUP that addresses inappropriate online behaviors Use the AUP as an instructional tool Become familiar with the text terms students are using Report all suspected incidents of bullying(physical and cyber) Have an established Internet Safety curriculum that is taught. And…don’t assume you know who the online bullies will be. The computer makes it easy for anyone to take on a different identity. Click here to learn about the Cyber bullying law in Maryland

How do I learn this secret language these kids are using to text and cyber bully? : 

http://netlingo.com/ http://vps.netlingo.com/acronyms.php http://www.netlingo.com/top50/acronyms-for-parents.php How do I learn this secret language these kids are using to text and cyber bully?

What is an AUP? : 

What is an AUP? An AUP is what is known as an Acceptable Use Policy. At the school level, an AUP acts as a written contract between administrators, teachers, parents and students. It outlines the terms and conditions for Internet use by defining access privileges, rules of online behavior, and the consequences for violating those rules.

Acceptable Use Policies : 

Acceptable Use Policies

Good AUPS have the following: : 

Good AUPS have the following: Elements of a good aup

Roland Park Country School’s AUP example(reprinted by permission) : 

Roland Park Country School’s AUP example(reprinted by permission) Use of the Roland Park Country School network is for educational purposes only. Use of the network is a privilege, not a right. All users are expected to exercise responsible behavior when on the network. Users shall accept the responsibility for maintaining the integrity of all aspects of the school’s network. • Each user is personally responsible for all uses and contents of her account. Giving out personal passwords, access codes, login procedures, or misrepresenting one’s identity in electronic communications is not permitted. • Unauthorized copying, removing, or distributing software violates copyright laws and software license agreements and is prohibited. Modifying, manipulating, or otherwise tampering with applications, files, and data on the RPCS network, or any attempt thereof, is not permitted. • Since the Internet and other accessible networks are open systems, the school cannot guarantee privacy or security. Users should not put anything on the network that they would not want others to see or read. • No one may use the network for obscene, annoying, threatening or abusive purposes. Users should not access or transmit materials which promote pornography, profanity, gender, racial, religious, and other biases, intimidation, or any other information counter to the RPCS philosophy. • The School reserves the right to monitor and intercept electronic or telephonic communications in the ordinary course of business, and may monitor or download computers or software, in accordance with applicable law.

AUPs can also address online behavior even it occurs off campus: : 

AUPs can also address online behavior even it occurs off campus: “Beyond the RPCS network, students are also expected to exercise responsible behavior online. When student presents herself publicly(such as on a social networking website) she must know that any inappropriate behavior, references or photographs(including but not limited to alcohol or drug use and sexual behavior) and/or inappropriate use of language(including but not limited to foul, profane, and/or derogatory) is in violation of School rules. In addition, students may not publicly post anything identified as RPCS including but not limited to the School name, logo, building, classroom, fields, teachers and, most importantly , herself or other students in uniform without the explicit permission from either the Head of School, the Director of Communication or the Academic Division Head.”- addendum to the RPCS AUP added in 2008 “RPCS reserves the right to take disciplinary measures in the event that any inappropriate off campus behavior by one of its students is bought to the School’s attention.”

Some important things to consider when implementing an AUP: : 

Some important things to consider when implementing an AUP: The AUP provides legal protection for the school, but is also suppose to serve as a teaching tool for students and staff. If the AUP is only used when a child violates its terms or is never referred to after it has been initiated, it is ineffective. The AUP should be the foundation for teaching safe and responsible technology use. Use it to engage students in creating and maintaining usable, age-appropriate guidelines for responsible computer use in the classroom that include descriptions of acceptable use, consequences for unacceptable use, and procedures for responding to unsafe or inappropriate online situations.

Cyber Predators : 

Cyber Predators

Who are cyber predators? : 

Who are cyber predators? Cyber predators are people who use the Internet for the sole purpose of finding victims to inflict harm. Cyber predators can be any age and either sex. Cyber predators use a technique called grooming to allure their victims. Grooming is a very purposeful, methodic and patient process cloaked in kindness and empathy.

Slide 27: 

The Grooming process S.I.T.S. SIMILAR INTERESTS TRUST SECRECY

Slide 28: 

TRUST: They make them think that they can tell them anything. When their victim talks about problems they always take their side. SIMILAR INTERESTS : They tell their prey that they like the same things that they like. SECRECY: They make their victims think that they can tell them secrets. They will then tell their victims to keep the friendship secret because no one else will understand. S.I.T.S

Ofir’s story : 

Very tech- savvy Frequent chat room visitor Came from a close family Ofir’s story

Ofir’s story : 

Ofir’s story Ofir was 16-year-old who met a 20-year-old girl online. They developed an online friendship. The relationship moved from chat rooms to e-mail, IM, and talking regularly on the telephone. His cyber-friend even sent him her photo in an e-mail. Sensing an opportunity to develop a genuine friendship, Ofir decided to go to the movies with his new “cyber friend” so that they could get to know each other offline. The young woman met him as planned. What Ofir didn’t know is that he had been set up. He was ambushed, shot and killed–a victim of a hate crime.

Ofir’s case shows that… : 

Ofir’s case shows that… Boys are as likely as girls to be targeted by predators. Predators don’t care about the sex of their victim. They are just looking for victims.

Predators take advantage of the natural curiosity of children. : 

Predators take advantage of the natural curiosity of children. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=scggT_Yt5wE&NR=1

So what can schools do to help protect their students against cyber predators? : 

So what can schools do to help protect their students against cyber predators? Teach Internet Safety lessons to students on a regular basis Involve the school counselor in the teaching process Know the warning signs that a student may be developing an unsafe, online relationship.

What can schools do… : 

What can schools do… Conduct in-services to parents, the community and the faculty about Internet Safety Use blocking, filtering, spot checks and lockdowns technology as described in the following ed tech issue: ( http://www.edtechmag.com/k12/issues/april-may-2007/cyber-safe.html ) Teach students about appropriate screen names and profiles and appropriate social networking behavior

Educator resources for Internet Safety Curriculum : 

Educator resources for Internet Safety Curriculum

Educator resources for Internet Safety Curriculum : 

Educator resources for Internet Safety Curriculum

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