game-based learning

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Presentation at Georgia COMO 2010

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Game-Based Learning : 

Game-Based Learning Horizon Prediction: 2 to 3 years to adoption

Slide 2: 

“Classic examples come from mathematics, such as Math Blasters, in which the rehearsal of math facts are embedded in a game that otherwise has nothing to do with math. A major criticism of this approach is that it conveys to students the message that no one would want to do mathematics because it is interesting, useful, or even beautiful in its own right, but only if it is first made more palatable by wrapping a game around it. “ Barbour, M., Rieber, L.P., Thomas, G., & Rauscher, D. (2010). Homemade PowerPoint games: A constructionist alternative to webquests. TechTrends, 53(5), 54-59.

Slide 3: 

“Classic examples come from mathematics, such as Math Blasters, in which the rehearsal of math facts are embedded in a game that otherwise has nothing to do with math. A major criticism of this approach is that it conveys to students the message that no one would want to do mathematics because it is interesting, useful, or even beautiful in its own right, but only if it is first made more palatable by wrapping a game around it.” Barbour, M., Rieber, L.P., Thomas, G., & Rauscher, D. (2010). Homemade PowerPoint games: A constructionist alternative to webquests. TechTrends, 53(5), 54-59.

Compare... : 

Compare... “Games have structure, provided through rules of play and clear objectives. Players get feedback throughout the game letting them know whether the strategies being used are helping to achieve the objectives.” (p. 90) Brooks-Young, S. (2010). Teaching with the tools kids really use: Learning with web and mobile technologies. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Sage

Compare... : 

Compare... “Games have structure, provided through rules of play and clear objectives. Players get feedback throughout the game letting them know whether the strategies being used are helping to achieve the objectives.” (p. 90) Brooks-Young, S. (2010). Teaching with the tools kids really use: Learning with web and mobile technologies. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Sage with learning

Categories of Games : 

Categories of Games games that are not digital games that are digital, but that are not collaborative collaborative digital games

Epistemic Games : 

Epistemic Games “What computers do...is let us work with simulations of the world around us. Computers let us make models that work the way some part of the world does.” (p. 9) “...computers now make it possible to learn on a massive scale by doing the things that people do in the world outside of school.” (p. 9) “Epistemic Games: Games that are fundamentally about learning to think in innovative ways.” (p. 10) Shaffer, D.W. (2006). How computer games help children learn. New York: Palgrave MacMillan

Issues : 

Issues What’s the tie to the curriculum ? How do children learn by playing? When am I supposed to find the time to add gaming ? How do I assess skills learned in gaming? How do I use games as tools for Instruction? Brooks-Young, S. (2010). Teaching with the tools kids really use: Learning with web and mobile technologies. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Sage. Pages 92-94.

Resources and Discussion : 

Resources and Discussion http://itechowtos.pbworks.com/ http://itechowtos.pbworks.com/Tools-for-Learning-in-2010 http://como2010games.pbworks.com/w/page/Games-in-Education-COMO-2010

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