ERNST, Max, Featured Paintings in Detail (1)

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ERNST, Max Featured Paintings in Detail (1)

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ERNST, Max Temptation Of St. Anthony 1945 Oil on canvas, 108 x 128 cm Wilhelm-Lehmbruck-Museum, Duisburg

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ERNST, Max Temptation Of St. Anthony (detail) 1945 Oil on canvas, 108 x 128 cm Wilhelm-Lehmbruck-Museum, Duisburg

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ERNST, Max Temptation Of St. Anthony (detail) 1945 Oil on canvas, 108 x 128 cm Wilhelm-Lehmbruck-Museum, Duisburg

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ERNST, Max Temptation Of St. Anthony (detail) 1945 Oil on canvas, 108 x 128 cm Wilhelm-Lehmbruck-Museum, Duisburg

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ERNST, Max Temptation Of St. Anthony (detail) 1945 Oil on canvas, 108 x 128 cm Wilhelm-Lehmbruck-Museum, Duisburg

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ERNST, Max Temptation Of St. Anthony (detail) 1945 Oil on canvas, 108 x 128 cm Wilhelm-Lehmbruck-Museum, Duisburg

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ERNST, Max Temptation Of St. Anthony (detail) 1945 Oil on canvas, 108 x 128 cm Wilhelm-Lehmbruck-Museum, Duisburg

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ERNST, Max Temptation Of St. Anthony (detail) 1945 Oil on canvas, 108 x 128 cm Wilhelm-Lehmbruck-Museum, Duisburg

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ERNST, Max Temptation Of St. Anthony (detail) 1945 Oil on canvas, 108 x 128 cm Wilhelm-Lehmbruck-Museum, Duisburg

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ERNST, Max Temptation Of St. Anthony (detail) 1945 Oil on canvas, 108 x 128 cm Wilhelm-Lehmbruck-Museum, Duisburg

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ERNST, Max Temptation Of St. Anthony (detail) 1945 Oil on canvas, 108 x 128 cm Wilhelm-Lehmbruck-Museum, Duisburg

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ERNST, Max The Virgin Spanking The Christ Child Before Three Witnesses: Andre Breton, Paul Eluard, And The Painter 1926 Oil on cannvas, 130 x 196 cm Museum Ludwig, Cologne

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ERNST, Max The Virgin Spanking The Christ Child Before Three Witnesses: Andre Breton, Paul Eluard, And The Painter (detail) 1926 Oil on cannvas, 130 x 196 cm Museum Ludwig, Cologne

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ERNST, Max The Virgin Spanking The Christ Child Before Three Witnesses: Andre Breton, Paul Eluard, And The Painter (detail) 1926 Oil on cannvas, 130 x 196 cm Museum Ludwig, Cologne

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ERNST, Max The Virgin Spanking The Christ Child Before Three Witnesses: Andre Breton, Paul Eluard, And The Painter (detail) 1926 Oil on cannvas, 130 x 196 cm Museum Ludwig, Cologne

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ERNST, Max The Virgin Spanking The Christ Child Before Three Witnesses: Andre Breton, Paul Eluard, And The Painter (detail) 1926 Oil on cannvas, 130 x 196 cm Museum Ludwig, Cologne

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ERNST, Max The Virgin Spanking The Christ Child Before Three Witnesses: Andre Breton, Paul Eluard, And The Painter (detail) 1926 Oil on cannvas, 130 x 196 cm Museum Ludwig, Cologne

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ERNST, Max The Virgin Spanking The Christ Child Before Three Witnesses: Andre Breton, Paul Eluard, And The Painter (detail) 1926 Oil on cannvas, 130 x 196 cm Museum Ludwig, Cologne

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ERNST, Max The Virgin Spanking The Christ Child Before Three Witnesses: Andre Breton, Paul Eluard, And The Painter (detail) 1926 Oil on cannvas, 130 x 196 cm Museum Ludwig, Cologne

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ERNST, Max Napoleon In The Wilderness 1941 Oil on canvas, 46.3 x 38.1 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

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ERNST, Max Napoleon In The Wilderness (detail) 1941 Oil on canvas, 46.3 x 38.1 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

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ERNST, Max Napoleon In The Wilderness (detail) 1941 Oil on canvas, 46.3 x 38.1 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

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ERNST, Max Napoleon In The Wilderness (detail) 1941 Oil on canvas, 46.3 x 38.1 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

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ERNST, Max Napoleon In The Wilderness (detail) 1941 Oil on canvas, 46.3 x 38.1 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

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ERNST, Max Napoleon In The Wilderness (detail) 1941 Oil on canvas, 46.3 x 38.1 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

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ERNST, Max Napoleon In The Wilderness (detail) 1941 Oil on canvas, 46.3 x 38.1 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

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ERNST, Max Napoleon In The Wilderness (detail) 1941 Oil on canvas, 46.3 x 38.1 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

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ERNST, Max Napoleon In The Wilderness (detail) 1941 Oil on canvas, 46.3 x 38.1 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

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ERNST, Max Napoleon In The Wilderness (detail) 1941 Oil on canvas, 46.3 x 38.1 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

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ERNST, Max The Antipope 1942 Oil on canvas, 127.1 x 160.8 cm Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, Venice

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ERNST, Max The Antipope (detail) 1942 Oil on canvas, 127.1 x 160.8 cm Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, Venice

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ERNST, Max The Antipope (detail) 1942 Oil on canvas, 127.1 x 160.8 cm Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, Venice

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ERNST, Max The Antipope (detail) 1942 Oil on canvas, 127.1 x 160.8 cm Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, Venice

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ERNST, Max The Antipope (detail) 1942 Oil on canvas, 127.1 x 160.8 cm Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, Venice

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ERNST, Max The Antipope (detail) 1942 Oil on canvas, 127.1 x 160.8 cm Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, Venice

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ERNST, Max The Antipope (detail) 1942 Oil on canvas, 127.1 x 160.8 cm Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, Venice

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ERNST, Max The Antipope (detail) 1942 Oil on canvas, 127.1 x 160.8 cm Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, Venice

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cast ERNST, Max , Featured Paintings in Detail (1) images and text credit   www. Music wav.        created olga.e. thanks for watching oes

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ERNST, Max The Antipope This painting of the Surrealist painter Max Ernst described sometimes of enigmatic and provocative is not a enigma for us although it is probable that it remains obscure for 98% of those which look at it. It treats image of the female sexuality perceived by the man. And of the consequences for this one. Of course it refers to the personal emotional situation of the artist at the time but as the unconscious one uses a universal language, that of the myth and symbol, one can decipher it easily and it has a universal range. As the horse is a symbol and a powerful prototype one first of all notes the 2 characters with head of horse. Equipped with an extraordinary vitality the horse symbolizes the aspect disciplined and completed instinctive forces, sometimes vital if it is white, sometimes morbid if it is black. Freud always underlined the bonds which link the libido, the sexual instinct, and the thanatos the instinct of death. On the left the female figure on red, sensual and acting color, has a face of horse surmounted by an owl and other night-birds representing with dimensions aggressive one and violent one of the female impulses, the female equivalent of male virility. It refers also as well as the lances to the image of the Greek goddess Athena, Minerve among Romans whose attributes are the olive-tree and the owl, warlike goddess, Athena is however recognized like the incarnation of the Reason, Equity and Wisdom. It is, moreover, the goddess of Arts, the Literature, Industry and the female Craft industry. Benevolent, she governs agricultural arts, made gift with the men of the plow and the manner learns to them of overcoming the wild animals. On the right it is the little girl on pink which requires council of “ the antipope ”. The Church having always been opposed to an unslung sexuality and without taboo the title of work is thus explained. This antipope, dark figure, have 2 heads, a head of black horse which means death and a human head pointing out the image of Meduse whose head decorates the shield of Athena that Persee offered to her to have helped it to overcome the latter. The little girl, but also the woman listens to the 2 votes. The speech of the violent sexual instincts and the speech of wisdom and the reason, that of Athena. The image of the woman is ambivalent for the man it represents wisdom and maternity, calm and reason, but also in the violence of its major impulses and the force of its instinct it connects it to death. The man is always afraid that the impulses of the woman entirely do not absorb it. The central figure is a skeleton, a support, which awaits the decision and the choice of the little girl to take the appearance which is appropriate. It is natural that the image of the woman (put aside the antipope) is triple because there are 3 Nornes in Scandinavian mythology, of the divinities of the race of the Adzes. The three Nornes which corresponds to the 3 Parques Greek are Urd, Verdandi and Skuld. Respectively personifying the destiny passed, the destiny present and the future destiny, they are the supreme referees of the human and divine destinies and decide laws of cosmos. The painting is certainly distressing for the man and enigmatic for the woman who does not recognize her sexuality seen by the glance of the man.

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ERNST, Max Napoleon In The Wilderness Napoleon in the Wilderness dates from 1941, the year in which Germany launched its Russian campaign on the Eastern Front. It presents a Surrealist interpretation of the theatre of World War II by Max Ernst. Napoleon in the Wilderness was painted in the USA, where the artist had made a new home after fleeing Europe. Max Ernst here shows us a fantasy world combining references to different historical epochs and cultures. It is tempting to link this painting, with its strange group of figures on the seashore, with the situation of the artist in exile. In order to create the captivating colors of the painting, Max Ernst used a special artistic technique called decalcomania. Decalcomania developed in eighteenth-century England was first used by the Surrealist Oscar Dominguez in 1936 and later taken up by Max Ernst. The artist produced works starting in the late 1930s in which paint was spread over some parts of the canvas, then glass or a sheet of paper was pressed onto it. Chance air bubbles, rivulets, and branchings of paint producing a varied surface structure also came about when the glass or paper was lifted from the canvas. In a further step, he used a paintbrush to transform the found structures, recalling coral or moss. Leonardo da Vinci had already discussed a similar artistic procedure around 1500 in his Trattato della pittura: "when you look at a wall spotted with stains, or with a mixture of stones, if you have to devise some scene, you may discover a resemblance to various landscapes, beautified with mountains, rivers, rocks, trees, plains, wide valleys and hills in varied arrangement." Stimulated by the structures, it became possible to produce stalagmite-like thickets populated by fantastic creatures on the canvas. By adding paths and horizon lines, the artist was able to create the impression of fantastic landscapes in Napoleon in the Wilderness.and their Relation to the Unconscious, which reminds us that a "favorite definition of joking has long been the ability to find similarity between dissimilar things - that is, hidden similarities." - a quote by Freud from his favorite Jean Paul.

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ERNST, Max The Virgin Spanking The Christ Child Before Three Witnesses: Andre Breton, Paul Eluard, And The Painter Here, portrayed as an earthy, frustrated woman, the Virgin Mary sharply paddles her young son - the unruly baby Jesus - on his bottom which displays red marks already left by her punishing hand. Watching through the background window and serving as witnesses are Andre Breton, Paul Eluard, and the painter himself; all three seem untroubled by the scene. Ernst successfully upends both his own Catholic faith with its devotion to Christ's mother Mary, while simultaneously debasing much of Western art history with its proliferation of loving scenes between the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Christ child, and also, undercutting the secular, bourgeois sanctity of motherhood. Ernst's painting is simultaneously blasphemous and sharply humorous. As expected, not everyone saw humor in the theme and the work created considerable controversy as an attack on Christianity and contemporary values.

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ERNST, Max Temptation Of St. Anthony This subject was the subject of many works which treat all of the topic of the temptation of Saint Anthony, Egyptian hermit, the first Christian monk. Resulting from a family from easy landowners, Anthony joined, as of the age of 20 years, the school of an ascetic close to his village. Thereafter, he chooses an increasingly hard lifestyle, locked up successively in a tomb and a fort, fighting against various temptations. The hermits are known in many cultures. hindouism, Buddhism and even taoism Chinese. Jesus Christ sacrifices to this tradition while spending 40 days in the desert where it is attacked by the malignant one. The ascetic and contemplative modes rigorous are supposed to start an internal alchemy which transforms the body in order to reach immortality or the spiritual revelation. What interests the surrealist painter it is not the religious dimension it is the representation of temptations. The Painting with the baroco colors represents the female body of course but also fantastic animals symbols of the evil. The Saint in any event is represented with the shape of a head of monkey, it is all to say. Carpets in the shade, of the night-birds, the Amphibians, of molluscs and the shellfish, all having sudden changes, seem very aggressive. One finds of the bestiary of the Garden of the early delights of Hieronimus Bosch so that one can bring closer the various forms to each picture. Most worrying it is that the hermit is far from being alone. All seems alive, the forest of course, the trees, the rocks and these elements evoke either sexuality, or of the animals to the quarrelsome and supernatural forms.

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ERNST, Max German-born Max Ernst was a provocateur, a shocking and innovative artist who mined his unconscious for dreamlike imagery that mocked social conventions. A soldier in World War I, Ernst emerged deeply traumatized and highly critical of western culture. These charged sentiments directly fed into his vision of the modern world as irrational, an idea that becamethe basis of his artwork. Ernst's artistic vision, along with his humor and verve come through strongly in his Dada and Surrealists works; Ernst was a pioneer of both movements. Spending the majority of his life in France, during WWII Ernst was categorized as an "enemy alien"; the United States government affixed the same label when Ernst arrived as a refugee. In later life, in addition to his prolific outpouring of paintings, sculpture, and works-on-paper, Ernst devoted much of his time to playing and studying chess which he revered as an art form. His work with the unconscious, his social commentary, and broad experimentation in both subject and technique remain influential.

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