ERNST, Max, Featured Paintings in Detail (2)

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ERNST, Max Featured Paintings in Detail (2)

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ERNST, Max The Robing Of The Bride (Attirement of the Bride)( La Toilette de la mariée) 1940 Oil on canvas, 96.3 x 129.6 cm Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, Venice

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ERNST, Max The Robing Of The Bride (Attirement of the Bride)(La Toilette de la mariée) (detail) 1940 Oil on canvas, 96.3 x 129.6 cm Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, Venice

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ERNST, Max The Robing Of The Bride (Attirement of the Bride)(La Toilette de la mariée) (detail) 1940 Oil on canvas, 96.3 x 129.6 cm Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, Venice

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ERNST, Max The Robing Of The Bride (Attirement of the Bride)(La Toilette de la mariée) (detail) 1940 Oil on canvas, 96.3 x 129.6 cm Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, Venice

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ERNST, Max The Robing Of The Bride (Attirement of the Bride)(La Toilette de la mariée) (detail) 1940 Oil on canvas, 96.3 x 129.6 cm Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, Venice

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ERNST, Max The Robing Of The Bride (Attirement of the Bride)(La Toilette de la mariée) (detail) 1940 Oil on canvas, 96.3 x 129.6 cm Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, Venice

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ERNST, Max The Robing Of The Bride (Attirement of the Bride)(La Toilette de la mariée) (detail) 1940 Oil on canvas, 96.3 x 129.6 cm Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, Venice

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ERNST, Max Woman, Old man and Flower 1923 Oil on canvas, 130.2 x 96.5 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

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ERNST, Max Woman, Old man and Flower (detail) 1923 Oil on canvas, 130.2 x 96.5 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

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ERNST, Max Woman, Old man and Flower (detail) 1923 Oil on canvas, 130.2 x 96.5 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

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ERNST, Max Woman, Old man and Flower (detail) 1923 Oil on canvas, 130.2 x 96.5 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

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ERNST, Max Woman, Old man and Flower (detail) 1923 Oil on canvas, 130.2 x 96.5 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

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ERNST, Max Woman, Old man and Flower (detail) 1923 Oil on canvas, 130.2 x 96.5 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

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ERNST, Max Woman, Old man and Flower (detail) 1923 Oil on canvas, 130.2 x 96.5 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

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ERNST, Max The Elephant Celebes (detail) 1921 Oil on cannvas, 107.9 x 125.4 cm Tate Gallery, London

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ERNST, Max The Elephant Celebes 1921 Oil on cannvas, 107.9 x 125.4 cm Tate Gallery, London

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ERNST, Max The Elephant Celebes (detail) 1921 Oil on cannvas, 107.9 x 125.4 cm Tate Gallery, London

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ERNST, Max The Elephant Celebes (detail) 1921 Oil on cannvas, 107.9 x 125.4 cm Tate Gallery, London

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ERNST, Max The Elephant Celebes (detail) 1921 Oil on cannvas, 107.9 x 125.4 cm Tate Gallery, London

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ERNST, Max The Elephant Celebes (detail) 1921 Oil on cannvas, 107.9 x 125.4 cm Tate Gallery, London

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ERNST, Max The Angel Of The Home Or The Triumph Of Surrealism 1937 Oil on cannvas, 146 x 114 cm Private Collection

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ERNST, Max The Angel Of The Home Or The Triumph Of Surrealism (detail) 1937 Oil on cannvas, 146 x 114 cm Private Collection

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ERNST, Max The Angel Of The Home Or The Triumph Of Surrealism (detail) 1937 Oil on cannvas, 146 x 114 cm Private Collection

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ERNST, Max The Angel Of The Home Or The Triumph Of Surrealism (detail) 1937 Oil on cannvas, 146 x 114 cm Private Collection

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ERNST, Max The Angel Of The Home Or The Triumph Of Surrealism (detail) 1937 Oil on cannvas, 146 x 114 cm Private Collection

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ERNST, Max The Angel Of The Home Or The Triumph Of Surrealism (detail) 1937 Oil on cannvas, 146 x 114 cm Private Collection

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cast ERNST, Max , Featured Paintings in Detail (2) images and text credit   www. Music wav.        created olga.e. thanks for watching oes

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ERNST, Max The Angel Of The Home Or The Triumph Of Surrealism The Triumph of Surrealism was painted by Max Ernst in 1937. The painting's initial name is The Angel of Hearth and Home, and it was retitled by Ernst in 1938. Ernst created this painting for the Exposition international du surrealism which took place at the Galerie de Beaux-Arts in Paris. This painting is one of few in his career that were inspired from political events. Ernst painted The Triumph of Surrealism shortly after the defeat of the Spanish Republicans in the Spanish Civil War. In this conflict, Spanish fascist leaders were supported by Germany and Italy in their victory. Ernst's goal was to depict the chaos that he saw spreading over Europe and the ruin that fascism brings to countries. Ernst uses the title of this painting to aid in evoking a sense of chaos and destruction. The use of the word angel confuses an observer at first due to the abstract and grotesque figure that is the painting's subject. He forces the viewers mind to think of these elements in a biblical sense. Ernst draws his audience to imagine the angel in the painting as if it were the angel of death from the seven plagues or a beast unleashed at the end of days. It appears that Ernst is even provoking his audience to question their own beliefs by calling such a figure an angel.

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ERNST, Max The Elephant Celebes At center, a large round shape dominates the composition that Ernst based upon a photograph of a Sudanese bin for storing corn which the artist has refigured as an elephant-like mechanical being from the subconscious.The painting's title comes from a childish and naughty German rhyme with that starts off, "The elephant from Celebes has sticky, yellow bottom grease," a bawdy reference to those in the know. Ernst's painting demonstrates his indebtedness to Freudian dream theory with its odd juxtapositions of disparate objects. Despite this disparity - a headless/nude woman, the bits of machinery - the painting holds together as a finished composition. Ernst's work elicits discomfort in the not knowing of his intentions and also, in early twentieth century audiences, disgust because of its irrelevant depiction of the human form (the headless nude) which is revered within art making (since people are made in God's image). Through this work, Ernst questions which is the "real" world - that of night-time and dreams - or that of the waking state.

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ERNST, Max Woman, Old man and Flower Dada had, necessarily, a brief life. It was vivid but ephemeral; a rebellious upsurge of vital energy and rage.It resulted from the absurdity, the whole enormous "schweinerei" of WWI. The young came back from that war in a state of stupefaction, and this rage had to find an outlet. Some of the most flamboyant members of the international Dada movement were never to be heard of again as consequential artists. They had their moment of significant exasperation, and nothing came along to replace it. But not Ernst. From the moment he left school, he had begun assembling the materials for a long lifetime in art. More precisely he had looked into the history of his own first years with the lucidity that came from a precocious familiarity with psychoanalysis. And although he detested the Prussians' military ambitions and resented their authority over the Rhineland, he did acquire, however unconsciously or unwillingly, a Prussian determination to stick to what he wanted to do and never leave off until it was finished. In Woman, Old man and Flower, 'As Ernst's series developed, this original surrealist identity with its heroic overtones became submerged, and it has remained submerged vis-a-vis art history, which has viewed the paintings only in light of their basic fascist identity, not in terms of this repressed surrealist one, which is repressed in the best and most obvious Freudian sense and therefore requires release, possibly in the surrealist friendly arena of wit or dreams.'

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ERNST, Max The Robing Of The Bride (Attirement of the Bride)( La Toilette de la mariée) Attirement of the Bride is an example of Max Ernst's veristic or illusionistic Surrealism, in which a traditional technique is applied to an incongruous or unsettling subject. The theatrical, evocative scene has roots in late nineteenth-century Symbolist painting, especially that of Gustave Moreau. It also echoes the settings and motifs of sixteenth-century German art. The willowy, swollen-bellied figure types recall those of Lucas Cranach the Elder in particular. The architectural backdrop with its strong contrast of light and shadow and its inconsistent perspective shows the additional influence of Giorgio de Chirico, whose work had overwhelmed Ernst when he first saw it in 1919. The pageantry and elegance of the image are contrasted with its primitivizing aspects - the garish colors, the animal and monster forms - and the blunt phallic Symbolism of the poised spearhead. The central scene is contrasted as well with its counterpart in the picture-within-a-picture at the upper left. In this detail the bride appears in the same pose, striding through a landscape of overgrown classical ruins. Here Ernst has used the technique of decalcomania invented in 1935 by Oscar Domínguez, in which diluted paint is pressed onto a surface with an object that distributes it unevenly, such as a pane of glass. A suggestive textured pattern results. The title of this work had occurred to Ernst at least as early as 1936, when he italicized it in a text in his book Beyond Painting. Ernst had long identified himself with the bird, and had invented an alter ego, Loplop, Superior of the Birds, in 1929. Thus one may perhaps interpret the bird-man at the left as a depiction of the artist; the bride may in some sense represent the young English Surrealist artist Leonora Carrington.

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ERNST, Max German-born Max Ernst was a provocateur, a shocking and innovative artist who mined his unconscious for dreamlike imagery that mocked social conventions. A soldier in World War I, Ernst emerged deeply traumatized and highly critical of western culture. These charged sentiments directly fed into his vision of the modern world as irrational, an idea that becamethe basis of his artwork. Ernst's artistic vision, along with his humor and verve come through strongly in his Dada and Surrealists works; Ernst was a pioneer of both movements. Spending the majority of his life in France, during WWII Ernst was categorized as an "enemy alien"; the United States government affixed the same label when Ernst arrived as a refugee. In later life, in addition to his prolific outpouring of paintings, sculpture, and works-on-paper, Ernst devoted much of his time to playing and studying chess which he revered as an art form. His work with the unconscious, his social commentary, and broad experimentation in both subject and technique remain influential.

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