ENSOR, James, Featured Paintings in Detail (1)

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ENSOR, James Featured Paintings in Detail (1)

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ENSOR, James Entry of Christ into Brussels (Christ's Entry Into Brussels in 1889) 1888 Oil on canvas 253 cm × 431 cm J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

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ENSOR, James Entry of Christ into Brussels (Christ's Entry Into Brussels in 1889) (detail) 1888 Oil on canvas 253 cm × 431 cm J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

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ENSOR, James Entry of Christ into Brussels (Christ's Entry Into Brussels in 1889) (detail) 1888 Oil on canvas 253 cm × 431 cm J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

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ENSOR, James Entry of Christ into Brussels (Christ's Entry Into Brussels in 1889) (detail) 1888 Oil on canvas 253 cm × 431 cm J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

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ENSOR, James Entry of Christ into Brussels (Christ's Entry Into Brussels in 1889) (detail) 1888 Oil on canvas 253 cm × 431 cm J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

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ENSOR, James Entry of Christ into Brussels (Christ's Entry Into Brussels in 1889) (detail) 1888 Oil on canvas 253 cm × 431 cm J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

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ENSOR, James Entry of Christ into Brussels (Christ's Entry Into Brussels in 1889) (detail) 1888 Oil on canvas 253 cm × 431 cm J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

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ENSOR, James Entry of Christ into Brussels (Christ's Entry Into Brussels in 1889) (detail) 1888 Oil on canvas 253 cm × 431 cm J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

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ENSOR, James Entry of Christ into Brussels (Christ's Entry Into Brussels in 1889) (detail) 1888 Oil on canvas 253 cm × 431 cm J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

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ENSOR, James Entry of Christ into Brussels (Christ's Entry Into Brussels in 1889) (detail) 1888 Oil on canvas 253 cm × 431 cm J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

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ENSOR, James Entry of Christ into Brussels (Christ's Entry Into Brussels in 1889) (detail) 1888 Oil on canvas 253 cm × 431 cm J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

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ENSOR, James Entry of Christ into Brussels (Christ's Entry Into Brussels in 1889) (detail) 1888 Oil on canvas 253 cm × 431 cm J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

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ENSOR, James Entry of Christ into Brussels (Christ's Entry Into Brussels in 1889) (detail) 1888 Oil on canvas 253 cm × 431 cm J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

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ENSOR, James Entry of Christ into Brussels (Christ's Entry Into Brussels in 1889) (detail) 1888 Oil on canvas 253 cm × 431 cm J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

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ENSOR, James Self-Portrait With Masks 1899 Oil on canvas 80 x 120 cm Menard Art Museum, Komaki, Japan

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ENSOR, James Self-Portrait With Masks (detail) 1899 Oil on canvas 80 x 120 cm Menard Art Museum, Komaki, Japan

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ENSOR, James Self-Portrait With Masks (detail) 1899 Oil on canvas 80 x 120 cm Menard Art Museum, Komaki, Japan

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ENSOR, James Self-Portrait With Masks (detail) 1899 Oil on canvas 80 x 120 cm Menard Art Museum, Komaki, Japan

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ENSOR, James Self-Portrait With Masks (detail) 1899 Oil on canvas 80 x 120 cm Menard Art Museum, Komaki, Japan

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ENSOR, James Self-Portrait With Masks (detail) 1899 Oil on canvas 80 x 120 cm Menard Art Museum, Komaki, Japan

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ENSOR, James Self-Portrait With Masks (detail) 1899 Oil on canvas 80 x 120 cm Menard Art Museum, Komaki, Japan

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ENSOR, James Self-Portrait With Masks (detail) 1899 Oil on canvas 80 x 120 cm Menard Art Museum, Komaki, Japan

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ENSOR, James Self-Portrait With Masks (detail) 1899 Oil on canvas 80 x 120 cm Menard Art Museum, Komaki, Japan

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cast ENSOR, James , Featured Paintings in Detail (1) images and text credit   www. Music wav.        created olga.e. thanks for watching oes

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ENSOR, James Self-Portrait With Masks In Self-Portrait with Masks (1899), the artist paints himself in the middle of a carnival throng. Only the heads are visible in the perspective, the bodies blocked by an agglomeration of weird and scary faces. Near the center of the canvas is the artist himself, looking a little apprehensive, but very human in comparison to the ghouls, demons, monsters and skulls hemming him in on all sides. The painting begs questions about an artist who never managed to fit in.

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ENSOR, James Entry of Christ into Brussels (Christ's Entry Into Brussels in 1889) "Christ's Entry Into Brussels in 1889" is considered Ensor's most famous work and was a precursor to Expressionism. It represents a "future" event, that of the coming of Christ in modern Brussels. While Christ's aura can be seen in the far background, the foreground is dominated by a mass of people (reminiscent of the masks from other paintings of the artist; there are also a few skulls) and slogans ("Vive la sociale!", "Vive Jésus, roi de Bruxelles!"). The painting was rejected by Les XX, and not exhibited until 1929. It was shown at his studio in his lifetime. It was exhibited at the Royal Museum of Fine Arts, Antwerp from 1947 to 1983, Kunsthaus Zürich from 1983 to 1987. It showed at a retrospective in 1976 at the Art Institute of Chicago, and Guggenheim Museum. The painting is on permanent exhibition at the Getty Center in Los Angeles. An 1898 etching is based on it, bearing the same title and concept, but featuring a more complex composition, with more details, characters and slogans.

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ENSOR, James Sidney Edouard, Baron   Belgian painter, printmaker and draughtsman. Trained in Brussels, he spent most of his life in his native Ostend. In 1883 he joined a group known as Les Vingt (The Twenty) and began depicting skeletons, phantoms, masks, and other images of grotesque fantasy as social commentary. His Entry of Christ into Brussels (1888), painted in smeared, garish colours, provoked outrage. No single label adequately describes the visionary work produced by Ensor between 1880 and 1900, his most productive period. His pictures from that time have both Symbolist and Realist aspects, and in spite of his dismissal of the Impressionists as 'superficial daubers' he was profoundly concerned with the effects of light. His imagery and technical procedures anticipated the colouristic brilliance and violent impact of Fauvism and German Expressionism and the psychological fantasies of Surrealism.

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