Climate Change: Recent Scientific Findings

Views:
 
     
 

Presentation Description

Charts of recent scientific findings on climate change. Public Domain PowerPoint - can be copied and updated for lectures on climate change (non-commercial and commercial). Updated May 2014.

Comments

Presentation Transcript

Climate Change :

Climate Change Charts of Recent Scientific Findings on Climate Change Created January 2013 This PowerPoint Presentation is in the Public Domain

PowerPoint Presentation:

Global Surface Temperatures By NASA Earth Observatory

PowerPoint Presentation:

Greenhouse Gas Concentrations for 2,000 Years By U.S. Global Climate Research Program

PowerPoint Presentation:

Change in CO 2 Levels Over 650,000 Years By Down to Earth Climate Science based on NASA charts

PowerPoint Presentation:

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations and Global Annual Average Temperatures By NOAA/NCDC

PowerPoint Presentation:

The Carbon Bathtub By National Geographic

PowerPoint Presentation:

The Carbon Bathtub By The Environmental Protection Agency

PowerPoint Presentation:

Shifting Distribution of Summer Temperature Anomalies (Northern Hemisphere) By NASA

PowerPoint Presentation:

Land & Ocean Temperature Anomalies 2012 By NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center

PowerPoint Presentation:

2012 Record Breaking Heat By Climate Central Using NOAA/NCDC U.S. Records Database

PowerPoint Presentation:

Projected Changes in Global Average Temperatures: Three Scenarios From IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios Projected changes in global average temperatures under three emissions scenarios (rows) for three different time periods (columns). Changes in temperatures are relative to 1961-1990 averages. The scenarios come from the IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios: B1 is a low emissions scenario, A1B is a medium-high emissions scenario, and A2 is a high emissions scenario. Source: National Research Council 2010

PowerPoint Presentation:

Arctic Sea Ice Levels By NASA

PowerPoint Presentation:

Land Ice Levels in Antarctica and Greenland By NASA

PowerPoint Presentation:

Sea Level Rise By NASA

PowerPoint Presentation:

Projected Sea Level Rise in New York City By Center for Climate Systems Research (CCSR) Combined observed (black line) and projected sea level rise for two future sea level rise scenarios. Projected global climate model (GCM) changes through time are joined to the observed historical data. Dark blue shows the range of projections for the NPCC rapid ice-melt scenario while light blue shows the range of projections for the GCM-based sea level rise approach. The three thick lines (green, red, and blue) within each sea level rise scenario show the average for each emissions scenario across 7 GCMs. A ten-year filter has been applied to the observed data and modeled output. (Credit: CCSR, 2011)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Projected Sea Level Rise Near New Orleans By United States Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) In the Gulf Coast, 2,400 miles of major roadway could be permanently flooded by sea level rise in the next 50 to 100 years. This map shows roadways at risk under relative sea level rise of about four feet—within the range of end-of-century projections for this region (under medium- and high-emissions scenarios). In total, 24% of interstate highway miles and 28% of secondary road miles in the Gulf Coast region are at elevations below 4 feet. Source: USGCRP (2009)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Ocean Acidification: Pacific Ocean CO 2 and pH Mauna Loa data: Dr. Pieter Tans, NOAA/ESRL; HOTS/Aloha data: Dr. David Karl, University of Hawaii. As oceans continue to absorb ever-increasing amounts of atmospheric CO2, scientists are concerned that the chemistry of the ocean will change. A change in ocean chemistry could have negative consequences for marine organisms, marine food webs and entire ecosystems. Scientists are particularly concerned about the pH chemistry of ocean water. A change in pH can make substances more acidic or more basic (or alkaline). Many organisms, including ourselves, cannot tolerate changes in pH. For example, human blood has a narrow pH range of 7.35 - 7.45. If our blood pH were to change even slightly, our health could be negatively impacted. Marine organisms are no different. Since the industrial revolution, ocean acidity has increased by 30%.

PowerPoint Presentation:

400,000 Hiroshima Atomic Bombs Per Day By NASA Climate Scientist James Hansen “[The current increase in global warming is] equivalent to exploding 400,000 Hiroshima atomic bombs per day 365 days per year. That’s how much extra energy Earth is gaining each day.” (James Hansen, NASA Climate Scientist)

PowerPoint Presentation:

Only 0.17 Percent of Peer-Reviewed Papers Reject Global Warming By James Lawrence Powell (jamespowell.org) The chart comes from James Lawrence Powell, a geologist, science-writer, and former professor. Powell reviewed 13,950 peer-reviewed scientific articles published between January 1991 and November 9, 2012 that mentioned "global warming" or "global climate change."

PowerPoint Presentation:

“Imagine a giant asteroid on a direct collision course with Earth. That is the equivalent of what we face now [with climate change], yet we dither.” (James Hansen, NASA Climate Scientist)

authorStream Live Help